Low Income Landlords and Council Tax

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    Low Income Landlords and Council Tax

    Hello there.

    If a self employed landlord is earning under the personal allowance threshold, should he/she have to pay council tax on an empty house/apartment?

    Thanks,

    Bob.

    #2
    Why should he have preferential treatment over anyone else??

    On what grounds does THIS local council grant not needing to pay council tax on THAT property?? Apologies, but I can't work it out from your post...
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

    Comment


      #3
      If it is vacant for re-decoration and no furniture inside the property, you may qualify for Nil charge for 6 months ( after inspection) or 25% discount for single occupancy but depends on your local council.

      For low income persons, you may get a discount on council tax for the property you live in but not for another property.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for the reply. It's just that some landlords can invest pretty much everything they have in an attempt to create a small business and then try to live off a mediocre income from the rentals - nothing wrong with that. The problem is when the council interferes and starts demanding that the landlord has to pay them council tax on empty properties as this can very difficult for the landlord to makes ends meet. This is very a different situation from people who have second homes which they frequent a few months of the year and do not use the home to generate income. You would expect that these people do not find paying council tax as much of a burden.

        Comment


          #5
          I would guess that it is more of a burden having to pay council tax on a property that does not generate any income rather than on a property that is a business acquisition.
          What I can't fathom is why anyone would think that they ought to get a 100% discount on Council and that everybody else should pick up their bill.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by LandlordOfTheEast View Post
            The problem is when the council interferes and starts demanding that the landlord has to pay them council tax on empty properties as this can very difficult for the landlord to makes ends meet.
            You're not describing a problem.

            You're describing what any Landlord should have known well before they got into the gig. Call it planning, budgeting, whatever... it's not a surprise expense.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by calm-on-the-surface View Post
              What I can't fathom is why anyone would think that they ought to get a 100% discount on Council and that everybody else should pick up their bill.
              Because of the low income they are on (under annual personal allowance). On an empty property noone is living there and, therefore, nothing should be demanded from the council to cover the cost of someone (not) living there and all the related expenses attached.

              Comment


                #8
                It's a property tax, not a personal tax.
                The property still makes demands on the council.

                If it catches fire, they'll still come and try and put it out.
                The police will still investigate a burglary and protect the property.
                And so on...
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by LandlordOfTheEast View Post
                  Because of the low income they are on (under annual personal allowance). On an empty property noone is living there and, therefore, nothing should be demanded from the council to cover the cost of someone (not) living there and all the related expenses attached.
                  If the owner has low income, it would be sensible to let out the property and receive some rental income .

                  At present if property has no furniture , most Councils will allow 6 months period with no CT from date of visit by their inspector.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The posting by Landlord of the east just beggars belief, it seems that he is quite happy for tenants to pay him a market rent which provides some level of income but the moment it is vacant complains that he should have to pay Council Tax. Sorry to be so blunt but "Wake up and smell the coffee"
                    I thought it was June 1st not April 1st

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Think of council tax on empty properties as an incentive to fill them with tenants. Empty properties are bad for the council as they have an obligation to house homeless people, so the more homes lying empty in their district the harder this becomes.

                      Most councils have now removed empty property discounts, indeed some are now charging double.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        If someone is on such a low income, I would seriously suggest disposing of the property since clearly there is no contingency for voids, essential repairs and maintenance etc etc.
                        As I said previously the question as posed beggars belief.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          People who only have a second home for leisure purposes no doubt have the money to cover any expenses.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Some people purchase properties in order to generate an income for themselves to live off. It could be that almost all their money has gone into this. Councils taking money from landlords (council tax) when their properties are empty, when no other income is available to the landlords (in the event of all properties being vacant) and when the landlord is actively trying to tenant the properties is a disgrace.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              So, if there is no fire do I get my refund? Wow, that's a lot of money for such an unlikely eventuality. Unfurnished properties don't usually have much in the way of things to steal and I would prefer to deal with the matter myself if a kettle - for example - was stolen - no need to waste police time.

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