Living on a Flood plain

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    Living on a Flood plain

    While not a lot can be done for the poor flooded people of Somerset Surrey etc other than hope that the government will spend on new flood defences, housing demand continues apace and many plans in the South east look to build in flood plains.

    having thought about it I think we can do so by adapting the building regulations and a little common sense.

    For less than 10% of the build cost, we simply adapt foundations to start the ground floor 1 meter above ground level and the house is accessed by steps ( 5) or a short ramp where needed. This gives basement storage and puts an end to "rising damp" and has a sewer valve to stop back flow into the house which owners shut down as needed.

    Telephones and wiring go back to being on utility poles and the consumer units are now on the first floor floor. Circuits can be separated so the power to the ground floor can be turned off.

    This should tackle most floods and mitigate loss if the flood is higher, and stop insurers making this uninsurable.

    Perhaps as the government has no legislation to put through in the next year and is giving all the MPS more time off, they could adapt this and do something useful.
    Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

    #2
    Quite so: Some years ago a new development was built in Maidenhead in a flood-plain area where the houses were 3-storey but ground floor was simply un-walled parking spaces, stairs up to property living quarters 1st & 2nd. (? Does that make it 3-storey for HMO purposes..). Naturally shortly after people moved in they converted downstairs into extra living space...

    I fear your approach of using logic & (common) sense to solve problems for the government will lead to disappointment... Hope I'm wrong...
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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      #3
      Which they would do to basements as well, but they have to realise that the conversion and contents are uninsureable, and in building regs terms uninhabitable without windows, which they are not permitted to install, as it breaks the tanking in the foundations.

      I think that you are right but you can only live in hope.
      Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

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