What standards should we expect?

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    What standards should we expect?

    A recent thread on here posted by the area manager of a well known letting agency showed a woeful lack of understanding of some basic legalities of landlord and tenant law.

    These are people we (or people like us) as landlords pay a fortune to, is it unreasonable for us to expect a certain level of knowledge? Is it right that landlords are expected to give information to agents who are then charging landlords for that same information?

    There are some excellent letting agents who contribute to this site and add knowledge. If those people were to seek opinions, I'd be happy to give them.

    The relevant threads have been deleted (I have copies) but I am guessing this is another users viewpoint on the same problem http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums...074#post339074.

    If I vanish for a while - you'll know I have been infracted (is that a real word?)

    #2
    Agreed: There are some excellent letting agents, I have one managing a property of mine..

    As an example of what sort of practice & policy one would want to find I'd suggest...

    Processes

    Our rigorous compliance and audit procedures ensure we meet legislative demands as well as our own high standards. All new letting recruits undergo a three month induction course and are required to take ARLA examinations. Team that with a strong commitment to staff development and a comprehensive referencing procedure, you can be sure we are experts at what we do.
    (Thank you, well know agency...)
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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      #3
      Anyone engaged in a profession, or indeed any business, should know the relevant law. That is not to say that he should know the law in depth or be required to think like a lawyer or provide other than the most basic of legal services. Most important of all, and this is where many even well-meaning honest agents come unstuck, is to know what you know and not guess what you do not. You need to know when to ask.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post

        If I vanish for a while - you'll know I have been infracted (is that a real word?)
        Well, you haven't vanished (fortunately) but the thread you linked to has. What was it?
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #5
          Google "landlordzone Very difficult tenant - L wants him out" - & you'll see traces of it but it appears, dunno why, not to be cached.... Perhaps with time the traces will expand...
          I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

          Comment


            #6
            While I agree with lawcruncher, this area like many businesses has long moved on to an approach that relies on process, not understanding and application.

            As long as you follow the process, then for many organisations there is greater value in a person who can "sell anything" than knowledgeable or trained staff.
            Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

            Comment


              #7
              I have no problem with staff being trained on a need to know basis, but with a business like letting if you are going to do that then the staff need a good manual. They need to be told in no uncertain terms that they never depart from the manual or change any documents without permission.

              Comment


                #8
                They'd have to keep changing the manual on a pretty regular basis, what with the new fangled ideas, laws and crap that each changing government comes up with.
                Letting agents would end up spending an unrealistic time retraining they're staff, can't see that happening somehow.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Izzycam View Post
                  They'd have to keep changing the manual on a pretty regular basis, what with the new fangled ideas, laws and crap that each changing government comes up with.
                  Letting agents would end up spending an unrealistic time retraining they're staff, can't see that happening somehow.
                  Brilliant bit of irony there izzy... (it was irony wasn't it???)
                  I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I am often amazed and companies attitudes to training; on one hand we have local authorities who grind to a halt due to training ( one recently sent all it's technical staff off for a whole week) and private companies that expect the training to be done after work hours.

                    Most updates as above can be done in a half hour, besides people stop listening if it's much longer. Start it at 9 sharp on a Wednesday and open at 9.35. Job done.
                    Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      As the old saying goes, if you think education is expensive try ignorance...
                      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by leaseholdanswers View Post
                        I am often amazed and companies attitudes to training;
                        When I left the forces I wanted to get a PSV licence as my demob course, The Army did not offer one so they gave me ten weeks to arrange my own, (on full pay) It took me ten hours spread over two weeks to get the licence, the rest of the ten weeks was my own. Then I had to get back into uniform for another three weeks before I went on my 28 day demob leave. Life could be tough in them days.
                        I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Izzycam View Post
                          They'd have to keep changing the manual on a pretty regular basis, what with the new fangled ideas, laws and crap that each changing government comes up with.
                          Letting agents would end up spending an unrealistic time retraining they're staff, can't see that happening somehow.
                          Laws change because society changes and because however carefully a law is drafted someone always finds a loophole.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yep your right there!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Some posts seem to be missing from this one - specifically about the way the 'letting agent' forum is used. Any ideas?

                              Comment

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