Taking photos without consent

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    Taking photos without consent

    What would be your reaction.....

    A big guy (who looks like he does not have a sense of humour) came to view a flat and immediately starts to take out camera and takes photos of room without so much as a by your leave. T has lots of electrical stuff etc

    I'm getting a bad vibe and because I feel he's infringing on T's privacy and T would not want him to, and I'm annoyed that he didn't ask first; I ask him to stop taking photo's of the tenants things. To which he replies that he is taking pictures of the room not the things, and 'do i think he's casing the joint' in an agressive tone. I point out that there are pics on the website (without furniture) but he says they are not good enough.

    Pretty soon the tenant is leaving because there is no way I would rent to the guy who is so rude and defensive and moody.

    What would fellow members have done in a similar situation?

    I have always asked for permission to take photos. Perhaps I should ask T's in advance if it OK for viewers to take pics.
    All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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    #2
    You could have taken pictures of him taking pictures, guess he wouldn't have liked that.

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      #3
      Unless its a vacant property I don't allow viewers to take their own pictures.

      If we have photos advertising only the front and rear elevation its because the tenants haven't wanted their possessions on view.

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        #4
        As part of a standard procedure for security on accompanied viewings ask for confirmation of identity.

        If they are difficult you can always say it's in the interests of personal security, exercise some discretion, or blame the insurers _rolleyes-, if your "spidey sense" is tingling about an applicant.
        Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

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          #5
          Thanks for replies and very good suggestions above

          I always take name and address and will sometimes use freely available information online to help verify identity. I also ask them who the property is for, if they are employed/student etc and why they are moving. So you get a feel for the situation.

          Funny cos when I have been viewing property for sale, all people ask me for is my name and contact phone; and I always give a mobile. I must sound trustworthy !

          The person in question was meant to be moving in on their own. The current address given checked out, but it didn't add up that he needed to take loads of photos if he was chosing the property for himself.

          Have learnt from this.
          All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

          * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * *

          You can search the forums here:

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            #6
            Some people take photos of a property for personal reference, to help them remember when viewing a few.... its not ususal but very rude if no permission is given or they don't ask 1st.

            Can I just say as well ladies and gents.

            The late nights are upon us, it can be pretty daunting if you are not 100% comfortable showing the viewer who has turned up on your door step.

            Always take details of the person you intend to show around, including phone numbers (preferably both home and mobile) and follow up with a call to confirm the appointment. If someone refuses to provide a number insist they call back to provide it or an appointment will not be made.

            Always let someone know when you are showing your property.

            If you feel intimidated do not let the viewer into the property. The best way of doing this is the old estate agent trick of picking up the wrong keys. I've fumbled at a door before now using the wrong set of keys because I don't feel comfortable with comments made by the viewer.

            When in the property let your viewer go first, and follow them into the room behind them.

            Alarmist point of view .... maybe.
            Common sense ..... definately

            I have been surprised at the number of LLs (mostly ladies) who I've spoken to lately who haven't felt safe or comfortable with the prospective viewers they've shown around.

            Mostly its your imagination, however its not worth the risk and a genuine viewer will remake an appointment with you.

            Comment


              #7
              Personal alarms

              These are available for a few pounds upwards, always carry two.

              I issue them to all staff including on site staff.

              Funny story one night porter liked to go to sleep-imagine their surprise when I dropped in around 11.30pm and "accidently set off my alarm"
              Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Bel View Post
                What would be your reaction.....



                I have always asked for permission to take photos. Perhaps I should ask T's in advance if it OK for viewers to take pics.
                It seems inappropriate - an invasion of T's privacy. I'd say no, in principle. If the photos were for a partner or friend who'd be sharing the property but unable to view for a good reason, that may be different, but I wouldn't allow it if the property was tenanted at the time.

                Our ads carry a virtual tour of the property (furnished but untenanted), but even if they didn't, I don't see why a prospective T should need to take lots of their own photos of the current T's possessions.
                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                  but I wouldn't allow it if the property was tenanted at the time.
                  .
                  OP has said it was a "big guy" and tenanted, how would you stop them?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by bullybantam View Post
                    .
                    OP has said it was a "big guy" and tenanted, how would you stop them?
                    It's obvious, isn't it? Halt the viewing and politely ask the person to stop taking pictures. If he refuses, stop the viewing completely and ask him to leave. If he refuses to do that, he is trespassing - call the police. I think it is unlikely to come to this if he a genuine prospective T, and if he is not, then you need shut of him in any case.
                    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                      It's obvious, isn't it? Halt the viewing and politely ask the person to stop taking pictures. If he refuses, stop the viewing completely and ask him to leave. If he refuses to do that, he is trespassing - call the police. I think it is unlikely to come to this if he a genuine prospective T, and if he is not, then you need shut of him in any case.
                      That'll be wisest course of action in most cases.

                      There have been cases of landlords assaulted, false allegations of sexual assualt and round these parts there was a case of a landlords home being firebombed by a tenant. I accompanied a landlord to a high risk eviction, the tenant still kicked off, was defused but could have turned nasty.


                      While the property game is low risk, it's not zero risk.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Article in "Landlord & Buy-to-Let Magazine" - see
                        http://www.landlordnet.co.uk/
                        Where a buyer/tenant was allowed to wander by estate agent, posted videos on't t'Interweb & Estate Agent has been fined (article is confused as to if this was a property buyer or tenant!!) .. see...
                        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Springfields View Post
                          I have been surprised at the number of LLs (mostly ladies) who I've spoken to lately who haven't felt safe or comfortable with the prospective viewers they've shown around.
                          I'm always quite surprised by the number of unaccompanied female prospective tenants who show up for viewings when I'm advertising a property for rent. I always take the phonecall and organise the appointment, so it's not as if there's ever any doubt that it will be a bloke conducting the viewing. Certainly most women do come with a friend or whatever, but the sizeable minority who obviously don't consider the risk seems pretty worrying.

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