Technology You Could Manage Without?

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    #16
    8. Computer printers which seem bargainous at £20 but require four replacement cartridges each costing as much as the printer itself.
    9. Machines for making carrots into tiny barrel shapes.
    10. Mechanical musical hamsters which affect to do kung fu.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #17
      Originally posted by moanygit View Post
      too late, the A380 is Far far bigger than the 747-400 or -8

      It is necessary though. more people on an airplane, makes it more fuel efficient.
      Not convinced on the A380.

      - Massive queues at checkin, luggage collection, immigration etc.
      - More chance of a passenger falling ill and ending up in Goose Bay on the transatlantic run.
      - juicier terrorist target

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        #18
        Originally posted by bullybantam View Post
        - Massive queues at checkin, luggage collection, immigration etc.
        Twice as many check in desks, luggage belts, immigration desks open. no problem.

        Originally posted by bullybantam View Post
        - More chance of a passenger falling ill and ending up in Goose Bay on the transatlantic run.
        Also more chance of having a doctor on board

        Originally posted by bullybantam View Post
        - juicier terrorist target
        Security proceedures are the same for all aircraft so, you are no more or less likely to be attacked.

        All of these issues were raised prior to launch of the A380, none of them have shown themselves as issues after about 3 years in service.

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          #19
          Originally posted by moanygit View Post
          Ah.. but this technology could lead to the possibility of grown-to-order transplant organs.
          In theory, yes, but in practice the cloned sheep seem to be born old, are worn out, and die much sooner than real sheep. It doesn't bode well for transplant organs, though there is the possibility they'll get it right eventually.


          Originally posted by moanygit View Post
          also, ...Tank-grown Meats, which are ethically sound for vegetarians..
          I do not eat meat, but the thought of eating synthesised 'gobbets' cultured in a laboratory makes me heave. It seems to beg the question of why people become vegetarians in the first place. Some are opposed to cruelty and waste in farming, but many others just don't like the taste and texture of the stuff. A non-starter, I hope.


          Originally posted by moanygit View Post
          surely this is a technology with beneficial (as well as detrimental, I grant you) possibilities..
          I expect most technologies could claim that; it is a question whether the benefits outweigh the detriment in each case.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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            #20
            Originally posted by jta View Post
            Fully agree with the herding comment, did you know why you have to adopt the crash position in case of a forced landing? There are two schools of thought.

            1. You wont notice the crew parachuting from the rear doors.
            2. So you can kiss your a**e goodbye.
            Isn't the truth actually:

            3. To reduce the likelihood of your corpse being decapitated, which makes it more hassle to identify you (dental records and all that)

            (or maybe that's just urban legend?)


            I remember reading one story about a mid-air crash where the accident investigators were able to calculate the exact angle the planes hit by comparing DNA samples taken from all along the leading edge of the colliding plane with the passenger seating list of the other plane...

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              #21
              Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
              Isn't the truth actually:

              3. To reduce the likelihood of your corpse being decapitated, which makes it more hassle to identify you (dental records and all that)

              (or maybe that's just urban legend?)

              Something that's definately not an urban legend is the real reason airlines ask passengers to close window blinds on night flights and keep them open on day flights. If you ever ask cabin crew, they'll simply say "because of regulations".

              But some of us know the real reason

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                #22
                Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                8. Computer printers which seem bargainous at £20 but require four replacement cartridges each costing as much as the printer itself.
                Ah! I guess you have the same printer as me. I don't like the snotty way it tells me I am using non genuine cartridges and then grudgingly starts printing again but refuses to measure the amount of ink in said cartridges, I spent several hours yesterday persuading it to print a test page, after a two month lay-off admittedly.

                There's a whole new thread in this subject, who wants to start it?
                I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by jta View Post
                  Ah! I guess you have the same printer as me. I don't like the snotty way it tells me I am using non genuine cartridges and then grudgingly starts printing again but refuses to measure the amount of ink in said cartridges, I spent several hours yesterday persuading it to print a test page, after a two month lay-off admittedly.

                  There's a whole new thread in this subject, who wants to start it?
                  It is often quicker and less stressful to produce each sheet by hand like a mediaeval monk, using a copperplate italic nib and illuminated lettering.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by jta View Post
                    Ah! I guess you have the same printer as me. I don't like the snotty way it tells me I am using non genuine cartridges and then grudgingly starts printing again but refuses to measure the amount of ink in said cartridges, I spent several hours yesterday persuading it to print a test page, after a two month lay-off admittedly.
                    My top tip for printing... buy a second-hand black-and-white Hewlett-Packard Laserjet 4 or 5 off ebay for about £25. They are bomb-proof, and you can still find original, sealed (obsolete) HP cartridges for them on ebay for a tenner or less. I bought a printer + 2 separate cartridges over a year ago and am still going strong on the first cartridge after what must be tens of thousands of sheets of paper...

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by bullybantam View Post
                      Something that's definately not an urban legend is the real reason airlines ask passengers to close window blinds on night flights and keep them open on day flights. If you ever ask cabin crew, they'll simply say "because of regulations".

                      But some of us know the real reason
                      Firstly, it's perfectly acceptable on any airline I've ever flown with to close the blind during a day flight, to block out excessive sunlight.
                      Secondly, on long haul flights, they try to keep all the blinds closed during the "night" portion of the flight, to aid with passenger rest cycles and general comfort, THis also helps to regulate meal service (ie ensure as far as possible that every one sleeps at the same time, and as many as possible are awake during meal service.

                      however, During landing and take off at night,

                      1) They dim the cabin lights
                      This is because if a crash were to happen your eyes would be more adjusted to the darkness and would make evacuation quicker and easier

                      2) They ask that you leave the window blinds up,
                      This is so any rescue teams can see inside before cutting a hole in the side of the aircraft, to check for people in the way, and fire inside

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        In theory, yes, but in practice the cloned sheep seem to be born old, are worn out, and die much sooner than real sheep. It doesn't bode well for transplant organs, though there is the possibility they'll get it right eventually.
                        All technologies were imperfect in their early stages


                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        I do not eat meat, but the thought of eating synthesised 'gobbets' cultured in a laboratory makes me heave. It seems to beg the question of why people become vegetarians in the first place. Some are opposed to cruelty and waste in farming, but many others just don't like the taste and texture of the stuff. A non-starter, I hope.
                        I've been veggie for 19 years now, and my reasons for turning veggie were nothing to do with the taste of meat, hence I enjoy the "fake-meat" type foods like quorn, etc etc.
                        If I knew they could grow actual meat, that tasted and had the texture of the real thing, without the requirement for slaughter or mistreatment of an animal, I'd be first in the queue for a burger! and I know many veggies who would be right there beside me.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by moanygit View Post
                          All technologies were imperfect in their early stages
                          That must go without saying. However, I have a sneaking feeling that compared with the introduction of electronic ICT devices in people's lives, the arrival of pencil technology, for example, cannot have resulted in the same degree of general frustration and wasted time. You hear of 'computer rage' but never of 'pencil rage'.

                          Originally posted by moanygit View Post
                          I've been veggie for 19 years now, and my reasons for turning veggie were nothing to do with the taste of meat, hence I enjoy the "fake-meat" type foods like quorn, etc etc.
                          If I knew they could grow actual meat, that tasted and had the texture of the real thing, without the requirement for slaughter or mistreatment of an animal, I'd be first in the queue for a burger! and I know many veggies who would be right there beside me.
                          That is your choice (or may be, if the stuff proves to be vaguely edible, safe and economically viable), and I suppose it is morally a more appropriate choice if you object to eating the products of factory farming and/or slaughter.

                          However, I am increasingly persuaded that as a species we have gone seriously wrong where food is concerned and that tank-cultured, fake meat is not the way forward. It is significantly different from fake meats like quorn or other texturised soya protein products which can indeed be nutritionally superior to processed meat and if you like the taste, fine. (I've always found them pretty dull, but to be fair they never claimed to taste good; they promoted themsleves as a texture-based meat substitute in traditional meat recipes). The only problem I have with them is -and I appreciate that you nay not agree! -is that (unintentionally perhaps and with a certain irony) they tend to reinforce the notion that a meat-based is 'normal/desirable': as long as something looks and tastes rather like meat, it must be 'good stuff' because meat itself is 'good'. Patently this cannot be true. Apart from anything else, much meat/meat derivatives eaten today is of poor quality and in some cases so fatty and full of additives that it is injurious to human health.

                          I have argued elsewhere that if the world's population is to be fairly and heathily fed, the richer nations are going to have to eat less meat protein and more vegetable and cereal protein. You may feel that tank-meat is the solution, but in a global context it seems little more than an expensive distraction from the real issue, which is to reconnect people with real food (whether meat, cereals or vegetables) and a diet which is nutritionally sound and ecologically sustainable.

                          What do others think?
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                            #28
                            Although totally and absolutely not a vegetarian I agree with MTG - if you don't eat meat, why eat fake meat?
                            Also do you wear leather shoes or belts - you shouldn't! Drink milk? Calves are shot at birth in many cases cos they are a "by-product" of the milk industry.
                            The whole subject is much more complicated than whether or not you like Quorn!
                            Oh by the way I do of course disagree with the reconnection with "real food" bit - meat IS real food, though I do agree that we should educate people to the life and death of the animals which provide it so kids don't think it is made in a factory....
                            Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                              The only problem I have with them is -and I appreciate that you nay not agree! -is that (unintentionally perhaps and with a certain irony) they tend to reinforce the notion that a meat-based is 'normal/desirable': as long as something looks and tastes rather like meat, it must be 'good stuff' because meat itself is 'good'.
                              The way I look at it is that it shows that one can enjoy the texture and quite often the taste of meat without the cruelty involved.
                              I appreciate that if your motivation for being veggie is not animal welfare related, this will have no effect on your choice.

                              Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                              but in a global context it seems little more than an expensive distraction from the real issue, which is to reconnect people with real food (whether meat, cereals or vegetables) and a diet which is nutritionally sound and ecologically sustainable.
                              Expensive?
                              it seems to me that it would be a far more efficient way of producing meat than having livestock lazily roaming thousands of acres of land which could otherwise be used to grow crops. A result of the "meat" being grown in a controlled environment, would be the near-irradication of health problems with animals such as foot and mouth etc. which would in turn bring about a reduction in chemical antibiotics, and other treatments finding their way into the food chain.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by islandgirl View Post
                                Although totally and absolutely not a vegetarian I agree with MTG - if you don't eat meat, why eat fake meat?
                                Also do you wear leather shoes or belts - you shouldn't! Drink milk? Calves are shot at birth in many cases cos they are a "by-product" of the milk industry.
                                The whole subject is much more complicated than whether or not you like Quorn!
                                Oh by the way I do of course disagree with the reconnection with "real food" bit - meat IS real food, though I do agree that we should educate people to the life and death of the animals which provide it so kids don't think it is made in a factory....
                                islandgirl, in our definitions of 'real food' I do not think we disagree! As you know I don't eat meat (I do eat fish), but I do not dispute that a sensible amount of naturally/heathily-reared and cooked meat can be a valuable source of protein for humans. As you know, it's the 'junk' I worry about, and the consumption in the developed countries of unnecessary amounts of meat protein - much of which is accompanied by excessive amounts of fat and salt and not enough vegetables... shown to be a significant factor in the current epidemics of obesity, cancer and heart disease.
                                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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