National Celebrations

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • National Celebrations

    It's Australia Day tomorrow.

    Why haven't we got an equivalent national day of celebration in Britain?
    I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

  • #2
    Originally posted by jta View Post
    It's Australia Day tomorrow.

    Why haven't we got an equivalent national day of celebration in Britain?

    Absolutely! I have always lamented the fact that we do not make more of the anniversary of the Relief of Mafeking on 17th May each year. It seems to me it would be an excellent opportunity to forget our differences and to celebrate our Empire and Great Britain's success in subduing barbarism in the Colonies, in a national outpouring of patriotic pride.

    Actually jta, the real answer is : because the Australians just have no taste at all and we do
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

    Comment


    • #3
      Two views:
      A. There are too many Bank Holidays in April/May. If we have another, let it be in mid/late October. Trafalgar Day, anyone?
      B. There are too many Bank Holidays. Abolish them all but provide (by statute) that all employees can add eight extra days' annual leave entitlement.
      JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
      1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
      2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
      3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
      4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

      Comment


      • #4
        That doesn't seem to worry them in Oz. They have at least 11 Public Holidays including Australia Day, Anzac Day and the Queen's Birthday.

        Now if they made us celebrate that here (QB) jta, Lawcruncher and I would make a point of going into work (even if we are retired) or if locked out of work, manning the Republican barricades.

        Let's have none of that jingoistic nonsense here!
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

        Comment


        • #5
          Another interesting word (jingo). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingoism says:
          Jingoism is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "extreme patriotism in the form of aggressive foreign policy". In practice, it refers to the advocation of the use of threats or actual force against other countries in order to safeguard what they perceive as their country's national interests, and colloquially to excessive bias in judging one's own country as superior to others – an extreme type of nationalism.

          The term originated in Britain, expressing a pugnacious attitude towards Russia in the 1870s. During the 19th century in the United States, journalists called this attitude spread-eagleism. "Jingoism" did not enter the U.S. vernacular until near the turn of the 20th century. This nationalistic belligerence was intensified by the sinking of the battleship USS Maine in Havana harbour that led to the Spanish-American War of 1898.
          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

          Comment


          • #6
            Uh oh. It's obviously Dictionary Day today.

            Again, if you hadn't been so snotty about them, I would have lightened the tone of that remark with a yellow smiley, because I judged an exclamation mark too 'over the top', in the circumstances. But your disapproval was so ferocious that you will have to put up with a comment which looks a smidgin more severe than it was actually intended to be.

            (And no, I don't really want to know the origin of the word 'snotty', thank you very much all the same). The skinflint one was interesting though.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

            Comment


            • #7
              Delighted to help. 'Snotty' is derived from Old English 'gesnot', from the same base as snout. Gets right up my nose, mind.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                Delighted to help.
                Since I specifically asked you not to help, the delight must remain with you and in you, I'm afraid.
                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                Comment


                • #9
                  Delight is in the I of the holder.
                  JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                  1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                  2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                  3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                  4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                    Delight is in the I of the holder.
                    In your case, I think it must be.
                    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                      Two views:
                      A. There are too many Bank Holidays in April/May. If we have another, let it be in mid/late October. Trafalgar Day, anyone?
                      B. There are too many Bank Holidays. Abolish them all but provide (by statute) that all employees can add eight extra days' annual leave entitlement.
                      Alternatively :
                      There are not enough Bank Holidays and we could do with a few more.
                      The newly created Bank Holidays could be inspired by events which in their focus or their significance would balance out the reasons for all the existing ones. So, to balance out the left-wing associations of May 1st, you could create 'Daily Mail-Reading Old Gits Day'. To avoid religious bias, we could have Christmas Day and one feast/holy day for each of the other established religions, plus a 'General Religious Nutters' Day', Atheists' Day and just to be on the safe side, Agnostics' Day.

                      Then everyone would be happy and it would only take out approximately 27 additional days from the working year, by my calculation. We work harder than any other country in Europe as it is - payback time!

                      mtg solutions inc
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        In your case, I think it must be.
                        No, in my case I sometimes have my sandwiches. I always carry spare phonecard, handkerchief, keys, carrier-bag, and comb.
                        JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                        1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                        2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                        3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                        4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                          No, in my case I sometimes have my sandwiches. I always carry spare phonecard, handkerchief, keys, carrier-bag, and comb.
                          So if you ever lose your memory and need to be identified, they will be able to work out that you are a phlegmatic (snotty) but vain property-holder/owner who distrusts mobile phones and does his bit for the planet by having a carrier bag on him at all times? Unless there is a more sinister reason for the carrier?

                          Paddington Bear kept marmalade sandwiches in his case. Perhaps you are related.

                          A poem for you:

                          About His Person

                          Five pounds fifty in change, exactly,
                          a library card on its date of expiry.

                          A postcard stamped,
                          unwritten, but franked,

                          a pocket size diary slashed with a pencil
                          from March twenty-fourth to the first of April.

                          A brace of keys for a mortise lock,
                          an analogue watch, self winding, stopped.

                          A final demand
                          in his own hand,

                          a rolled up note of explanation
                          planted there like a spray carnation

                          but beheaded, in his fist.
                          A shopping list.

                          A givaway photgraph stashed in his wallet,
                          a kepsake banked in the heart of a locket.

                          no gold or silver,
                          but crowning one finger

                          a ring of white unweathered skin.
                          That was everything.


                          Simon Armitage
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            No, Paddington was from Peru. The only other famous Peruvian was Michael Bentine.
                            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                              No, Paddington was from Peru. The only other famous Peruvian was Michael Bentine.
                              Jeffrey, you really should try reading a story to a group of 6 year olds. Notice they way some of them wander off (sometimes physically, but mainly in terms of the topic). For example, you could say 'So that was a nasty thing the Wolf did, wasn't it, children?' Most of them will nod, but one of them will go off on a complete tangent and say 'My hamster got caught in the lawn mower last night' or 'Do wolves have to go to the dentist?' If they do this too often, it reduces the storyteller to a gibbering wreck.

                              Please explain how the fact that Paddington Bear (who is in any case a fictional construct), comes from Peru, makes it any less likely that you are related to him in the way I implied. Perhaps we had better put Michael Bentine back in the NSFC until we've sorted this one out.
                              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                              Comment

                              Latest Activity

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X