Words that change their meanings

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    Words that change their meanings

    Originally posted by Paul_f View Post
    You are presumably referring to Section 5(3)(e) of the Housing Act 1988, and if Notice were to be served after the fixed term ended then the tenant would have security of tenure for 18 months at least it seems.
    Quite. Quite. (Had to say it twice to get up to ten characters.)

    #2
    Words that change their meanings

    Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
    Quite. Quite. (Had to say it twice to get up to ten characters.)
    It's interesting how 'quite' is one of the few words in English which can mean one thing and its opposite, depending on context. 'Wicked' is another one.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
      It's interesting how 'quite' is one of the few words in English which can mean one thing and its opposite, depending on context. 'Wicked' is another one.
      'Gay' (nothing to do with it's other meaning of 'homosexual') and 'sick' are a couple more, my teens assure me.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
        'Gay' (nothing to do with it's other meaning of 'homosexual') and 'sick' are a couple more, my teens assure me.
        What - so is 'sick' good, now? That one hasn't reached this corner of Yorkshire yet - although it's like the films - we reckon about four years after they come out in London!
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #5
          bollox also has opposite meanings.
          A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
          W.Churchill

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            #6
            Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
            bollox also has opposite meanings.
            And the opposite of bollocks is...?
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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              #7
              Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
              bollox also has opposite meanings.
              ...and a correct spelling, unlike yours.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                #8
                Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
                bollox also has opposite meanings.
                But only when the they belong to the dog.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                  But only when the they belong to the dog.
                  Yes! However, it is interesting that with a few exceptions (such as the dog's bollocks) bits of the body feature prolifically in abuse, rather than in compliments.

                  I had a student who researched this once and he found that amongst teenagers at any rate, the male anatomy was over-represented in insults used by both males and females.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post

                    I had a student who researched this once and he found that amongst teenagers at any rate, the male anatomy was over-represented in insults used by both males and females.
                    I don't quite see that! after all if you are going to call someone an a**eh**e, then that can refer to male or female anatomy, and I've known some right 'tits' in my time, and that has to be feminine. The nasty 'c' word can be heard in London anywhere, anytime, and I daresay in the rest of the country too.
                    So what exotic swearwords was your student researching?
                    I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                      I had a student who researched this once
                      The things that they do to gain a Ph.D., and he did it only once. Hard work?

                      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                      amongst teenagers at any rate
                      Any rate of teenagers is too much. They're over-rated (as are most bowlers in English cricket).
                      JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                      1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                      2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                      3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                      4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by jta View Post
                        I don't quite see that! after all if you are going to call someone an a**eh**e, then that can refer to male or female anatomy, and I've known some right 'tits' in my time, and that has to be feminine. The nasty 'c' word can be heard in London anywhere, anytime, and I daresay in the rest of the country too.
                        So what exotic swearwords was your student researching?
                        dick
                        dickhead
                        cock
                        prick
                        willy
                        knob
                        knob-head
                        ballbag
                        scrote

                        ...must I continue?
                        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by jta View Post
                          The nasty 'c' word can be heard in London anywhere, anytime, and I daresay in the rest of the country too.
                          Obviously it is: with an 'o', an 'r', and a 'y'.
                          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                            Obviously it is: with an 'o', an 'r', and a 'y'.
                            In fact, whenever anyone speaks, like Hamlet, of country matters.
                            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                              In fact, whenever anyone speaks, like Hamlet, of country matters.
                              More 'speaking' in Henry V (and some holding of manhoods too):

                              And gentlemen in England now abed
                              Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here
                              And hold their manhoods cheap whilst any speaks
                              That fought with us upon St. Crispin's Day.
                              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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