Have the Police and CPS Taken Leave of Their Bl**dy Senses?

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    Have the Police and CPS Taken Leave of Their Bl**dy Senses?

    A 19 year old motorcyclist has been sentenced to an electronic tag enforced curfew and community service for the following heinous offence:

    Thomas Payne intentionally and without authority or reasonable cause, caused sweets to be on a road, namely Lancaster Circus, in such circumstances that it would have been obvious to a reasonable person that to do so would be dangerous’ contrary to the Road Traffic Act.

    Payne insists: “They were just falling out of my pocket. Because of the time they followed me for they said I should have known.”

    WTF? Have the Police and CPS (aka Couldn't Prosecute Satan) gone collectively insane?

    http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/Ne...opping-sweets/
    Health Warning


    I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

    All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

    #2
    Originally posted by agent46 View Post
    A 19 year old motorcyclist has been sentenced to an electronic tag enforced curfew and community service for the following heinous offence:

    Payne insists: “They were just falling out of my pocket. Because of the time they followed me for they said I should have known.”

    WTF? Have the Police and CPS (aka Couldn't Prosecute Satan) gone collectively insane?
    I assume the lad was concentrating on his driving, he would have been able to spot the noddy's in his mirror.

    But why did he plead guilty? It sounds as if someone gave him some very bad advice.

    It reminds me of a time when a Woodentop stopped me outside Coventry Nick and decided to prosecute me for having an under age passenger, this was my son, who had left school and was then working for me. Even though he was told the lad was 16 and a half, which the boy confirmed, he would not believe it. I think the summons said he was obviously no more than twelve. Case thrown out.
    So it's not new, they've been nuts for years.
    I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

    Comment


      #3
      Well, I think the police were just doing their duty, protecting society from an antisocial, sweet-dropping, Danger To The Public.

      It's all very well to say 'But it was only a few sweets'. That's not the point. Today, a few sweets. Tomorrow, a Mars Bar. The day after, a multi-pack of Twixes. Then what? Before you know it, Britain's roads could be knee-deep in dangerous confectionery.

      Lock him up in a gingerbread house and throw away the key, I say.
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by jta View Post
        I assume the lad was concentrating on his driving, he would have been able to spot the noddy's in his mirror.
        Perhaps plod just followed the trail he'd left behind, a la Hansel and Gretel? Don't let it be said that the Police can no longer do good, solid, old-fashioned detective work!

        Originally posted by jta View Post
        But why did he plead guilty? It sounds as if someone gave him some very bad advice.
        Ahem..... well, his case was heard on 24th March which is round about the time when they let all the pupil barristers loose on the public (ie: when a pupil's second (practicing) 'six' begins). A bit of inside knowledge - if you must get in trouble with the Police for a minor offence, try to make sure your case is heard sometime between September and February. All the pupils who were no good will have been ditched by their chambers in the late summer, and the new pupils who start in September are not allowed to handle their own cases until the following March, so therefore during that period you will always get someone who has at least 6 months experience under their belt, and has also performed well enough to have been taken on permanently by chambers.

        In his barrister's (hypothetical) defence, they probably didn't receive the brief from the instructing solicitors until they arrived at court in the morning (if they were lucky - sometimes they get no paperwork at all), and then they probably couldn't find their client, and then they were probably called on after only having met him 20 minutes beforehand. Seat of the pants stuff, the Mags' Court



        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
        Well, I think the police were just doing their duty, protecting society from an antisocial, sweet-dropping, Danger To The Public..
        Tis true. All joking aside, a mint imperial could cause a danger on the highway to a motorcyclist.

        I once crashed when I was cornering and my front wheel ran over a small stone (which is similar to, although less tasty than a mint imperial). I was obviously close enough to the limit of grip for this to cause the front tyre to lose adhesion, and the next thing I knew it was, ground, sky, ground, sky, ground, sky ground, hedge, sky, a small amount of bruising and large repair bill.

        I've also heard of someone else crashing when they lost control on a piece of toast lying in the road.

        Still, I think it could have been dealt with by a stern word in the ear rather than the impostion of a fairly draconian sentence and, more importantly, a criminal record that will almost certainly rule him out of any jobs which involve driving, and even some that don't. However, I do know that the Police Service (they are no longer a 'Force', which I think speaks volumes) is a pathetic box-ticking, statistics-fiddling shadow of its former self, and as this incident counts as a 'detection of a crime', which will go toward the figures that are taken into account by the Home Office's number-crunchers when the Chief Super is chasing promotion, it starts to make a bit more sense....
        Health Warning


        I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

        All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

        Comment


          #5
          Well agent, that last post, at one stroke, has restored my faith not only in the Great British Justice System, but also in the Boys in Blue.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

          Comment


            #6
            Thomas Paine HAS come a long way since he died in 1809. Now he knows much more about the Rights of Man, in the UK at least.

            See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Paine
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
              Thomas Paine HAS come a long way since he died in 1809. Now he knows much more about the Rights of Man, in the UK at least.

              See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Paine

              How odd that he has come back with his name spelled differently
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                How odd that he has come back with his name spelled differently.
                Here's ask.com's page 1 display of its "Thomas Payne" listing, so there:
                http://uk.ask.com/web?q=%22Thomas+Pa...=196&o=0&l=dir

                ALSO: Jane Eyre was in the news today. Here's more about her:
                http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/8060122.stm
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                  ALSO: Jane Eyre was in the news today. Here's more about her:
                  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/8060122.stm
                  Obviously a chronic attention-seeker, with a name like that. Serves her right. It's the deer I feel sorry for.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                    Obviously a chronic attention-seeker, with a name like that. Serves her right. It's the deer I feel sorry for.
                    Ah, you're all hart. He was only in it for the doe.
                    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                      Ah, you're all hart. He was only in it for the doe.

                      Now, how did I know those two were on the way...
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        Now, how did I know those two were on the way...
                        1. It struck a chordata?
                        2. The story cervidae you right?
                        3. You listened to "Any Antlers?" on Radio 4?
                        4. It was reining at the time?

                        Otherwise, I've no eyedeer.

                        (5. Erica Roe...)
                        JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                        1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                        2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                        3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                        4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                        Comment


                          #13
                          At the age of 14 i had my pushbike conviscated by our local village bobby for ...wait for it ....speeding !

                          He kept my bike for a week, (with the full agreement and consent of my parents) to teach me to slow down.

                          I went past his (bobby's) house and overtook a friend, who was flat out on his (restricted) moped. What never got discussed was the fact that i was being "towed"(hanging on to the back of another friend's 125cc) until 2 secs before we went past bobbies house, which he never saw
                          A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                          W.Churchill

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by agent46 View Post

                            In his barrister's (hypothetical) defence, they probably didn't receive the brief from the instructing solicitors until they arrived at court in the morning (if they were lucky - sometimes they get no paperwork at all), and then they probably couldn't find their client, and then they were probably called on after only having met him 20 minutes beforehand. Seat of the pants stuff, the Mags' Court

                            More likely he got to court assuming he would get access to free duty sol, only to find offence didn't qualify for such and ended up in the dock defending himself !(got the T shirt for this one !)
                            A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                            W.Churchill

                            Comment


                              #15
                              More interesting is the advert for White Dalton and the "legal" biking team Agent are you pictured ?

                              Edit: ad has cycled out but found it here !

                              http://www.whitedalton.co.uk/
                              A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                              W.Churchill

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