English grammar question - Jeffrey?

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    English grammar question - Jeffrey?

    There are 14 punctuation marks in English grammar. Can you name at least half of them? More interesting questions later.
    ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

    #2
    apostrophe ( ’ ' )
    brackets (( )), ([ ]), ({ }), (< >)
    colon ( : )
    comma ( , )
    dashes ( ‒, –, —, ― )
    ellipses ( …, ... )
    exclamation mark/point ( ! )
    full stop/period ( . )
    guillemets ( « » )
    hyphen ( -, ‐ )
    question mark ( ? )
    quotation marks/inverted commas ( ‘ ’, “ ” )
    semicolon ( ; )
    slash/stroke ( / )
    solidus ( ⁄ )

    I make that 15:

    solidus not accepted by all UK authorities.

    Cheers!

    Lodger
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Paragon View Post
      More interesting questions later.
      More interesting, or just more questions?
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

      Comment


        #4
        Art - you have been on Wilkipedia. Very good. Although why they put braces, parenthesis, and brackets together probably could be challenged.
        ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
          More interesting, or just more questions?
          LOL- Good one!!
          ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

          Comment


            #6
            1. Clarification:
            BRACKET is square: [ or ]
            PARENTHESIS is round: ( or )
            BRACE is curly: { or }

            2. Also note the different usages of the first two in legal contexts.
            Bracket signifies:
            a. (Law Report) case citation detail that is essential; or
            b. (generally) text that is not in the original source being cited.
            Parenthesis signifies:
            a. (Law Report) case citation detail that is not essential but provided for information only; or
            b. (general) text that is in the original source being cited and is parenthesised there.

            3. Sometimes both of these marks are used in a general context, so as to distinguish between a quotation/insert and another quotation/insert which the first one contains: just like the use of single and double quotation marks.
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
              1. Clarification:
              BRACKET is square: [ or ]
              PARENTHESIS is round: ( or )
              BRACE is curly: { or }

              2. Also note the different usages of the first two in legal contexts.
              Bracket signifies:
              a. (Law Report) case citation detail that is essential; or
              b. (generally) text that is not in the original source being cited.
              Parenthesis signifies:
              a. (Law Report) case citation detail that is not essential but provided for information only; or
              b. (general) text that is in the original source being cited and is parenthesised there.

              3. Sometimes both of these marks are used in a general context, so as to distinguish between a quotation/insert and another quotation/insert which the first one contains: just like the use of single and double quotation marks.
              I've been telling people all this for ages, but are they bothered?
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Paragon View Post
                Although why they put braces, parenthesis, and brackets together probably could be challenged.
                Answer: you couldn't keep your trousers up with parenthesis (and none too comfortably with brackets either).
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                Comment


                  #9
                  I must say, this thread has singularly failed to live up to my expectations of it.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                    I must say, this thread has singularly failed to live up to my expectations of it.
                    Charles Dickens had Great Expectations, but it didn't get him too far.
                    Except when he coughed- then he had Great Expectorations.
                    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Since when were guillemets part of English punctuation?

                      I have reached the age of 57 without knowing there was such a thing as a solidus.

                      I once dictated The sign is fixed with a bracket and my secretary typed The sign is fixed with a). Perfectly understandable when you are a lawyer's secretary.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                        Charles Dickens had Great Expectations, but it didn't get him too far.
                        Except when he coughed- then he had Great Expectorations.
                        Punning is a talent which no man affects to despise but he that is without it. Jonathan Swift

                        Punning is the lowest and most grovelling kind of wit. John Dryden

                        So, who is with Swift and who is with Dryden?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                          Since when were guillemets part of English punctuation?
                          Aren't they those birds which peck your eyes out at the seaside if you as much as look at them?


                          Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                          I have reached the age of 57 without knowing there was such a thing as a solidus.
                          Well, that's probably because you had a nice middle class upbringing with plenty of roughage in your diet.


                          Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                          I once dictated The sign is fixed with a bracket and my secretary typed The sign is fixed with a). Perfectly understandable when you are a lawyer's secretary.
                          And thinking not of what you are typing, but of fleeing the dull world of stenography and conveyancing for whirlwind romances in Gothic castles and passionate encounters in lonely railway stations...or alternatively, of what to have for tea tonight.
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                            Punning is a talent which no man affects to despise but he that is without it. Jonathan Swift

                            Punning is the lowest and most grovelling kind of wit. John Dryden

                            So, who is with Swift and who is with Dryden?
                            The race is to the Swift.
                            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Surely all good men should be with the old Dean of St Patrick's, Dublin, Jonathan Swift: If for no other reason that his excellent pamphlet... "The Benefit of F***ing Explained".
                              http://www.amazon.co.uk/Benefit-Expl...1775168&sr=1-1

                              Cheers!

                              Lodger
                              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                              Comment

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