Asking Landlord For Reference From Previous Tenants.

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    Asking Landlord For Reference From Previous Tenants.

    https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/new-t...tion-c-5741904

    New turmoil for prospective tenant in Sydney whose rental application was rejected after he asked one question

    ‘This was very funny a few weeks ago, not so funny now when I desperately need a place.’

    #2
    Yup. Why tenants need to drive out private individual good landlords, so that the whole city is controlled by a few interacting commercial companies who can blacklist city-wide.

    But I think tenant is mis-reading why he was given a hard time. He is setting up a red flag that he is likely to be generally troublesome in a state -created environment where troublesome tenants are sometimes stealing tenants. A bit like joking about a bomb at airport security. Big brushes paint broad strokes and often bad pictures. But that is what governments want.

    Australia is no different

    Comment


      #3
      The guy's a prawn (as they say in Oz).

      No doubt the agents suspect that he isn't a serious prospect and is just gathering material for a new comedy routine.
      (Copying the style of Joe Lycett perhaps?).

      However:
      If simply asking for a reference is being '"generally troublesome" then whey do landlords ask tenants for one?

      Answer - Because it's always good to know what/who you are dealing with.
      That stands just the same for a tenant as for a landlord, it's a two way relationship.

      Of course in this relationship landlords hold the whip hand, so can demand references without giving any themselves.

      Comment


        #4
        It's basically a reasonable request. Although I wouldn't go as far as offering a reference I have volunteered proof of my identity to prospective tenants. I am well aware that there are scams, and there is a point where a future tenant hands over money but has not yet moved in where they are exposed to considerable risk. It seems fair that they should know whom they are dealing with.

        However, since a LL reference is not the norm, anyone asking for one is identifying themselves as a person who does not conform to standard practice. That is likely to be a red flag. In a different market it might fly. Currently it is a risky move.
        There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

        Comment


          #5
          I always prove my identity and proof of ownership whether they ask for it or not (no one has yet) but if they asked for a LL reference I'd think they're likely to be a trouble maker so I'd turn them down too. References may be fair if you have 100, if you only have 3 you can't discard those written by a T with an axe to grind.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by doobrey View Post
            However, since a LL reference is not the norm, anyone asking for one is identifying themselves as a person who does not conform to standard practice. That is likely to be a red flag. In a different market it might fly. Currently it is a risky move.
            Maybe it should be the norm and standard practice?

            Oops, sorry, more work for overstretched landlords.

            I can't see it happening without legislation though.
            Even if legislated I suspect many would just keep a stock generic reference, and say it came from the last tenants but their details have been redacted because of data protection.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by nukecad View Post
              That stands just the same for a tenant as for a landlord, it's a two way relationship.
              Of course in this relationship landlords hold the whip hand, so can demand references without giving any themselves.
              I think ^ gets to the nob of the problem but is not quite correct. Of course tenants should get landlord references and landlords shoudl be delighted to give -- they would be a good thing.

              But the problem is that governments have created a situation where landlords hold the whip hand (as you say) up to the point at which a tenancy is granted. After that point all the whips are held by the tenant (who also holds a £400K asset).

              That imbalance and see-saw has created enormous problems for everyone except crooks.

              Comment


                #8
                Asking for landlord references isn't that ridiculous an idea. I would look at reviews before booking a restaurant or hotel or hiring a tradesperson so why not landlords? Unfortunately for the renter in the article I suspect the rental market in Sydney is much like in Perth and for every viewing you'll be getting 25+ people showing up so demand far outweighs supply.

                Competition in the UK's for rental properties may be rife but I think in Australian and New Zealand cities it is even worse. Someone in Auckland advertised at double bed in their garage for rent at a little over £500 pcm last year.

                https://www.9news.com.au/world/bed-i...2-7276e1468958

                Comment


                  #9
                  The problem with references for both landlord and tenants is that the decision being made is made quite infrequently and is unique to two people.
                  It's not like a hotel or restaurant where there's a significant number of instances of people experiencing something and it's likely that the customer experience is likely to be broadly similar.

                  The relationship between a landlord and tenant is often unique and the number of occurrences is normally quite small.
                  And the behaviour of a landlord and tenant towards each other can affect the actions and behaviour of the other quite significantly.
                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                    The problem with references for..... landlords ..... is that the decision being made is made quite infrequently and is unique to two people.
                    Not for me. At one time, I'd know (or know of), half the letting agents/landlords of the properties in my town and weight their references accordingly.

                    I bet your letting agent does similar for you.


                    Comment

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