Lebanon explosions

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  • flyingfreehold
    replied
    Hezbollah controlled the Port and the theory is that quantities were shipped from this dockside warehouse to wherever it was required for international terrorism. The same Ammonium Nitrate having been used combined with fuel oil in various worldwide atrocities. If they had cared about the Lebanese people and the risk to them of keeping it there, the product could simply have been ploughed into the land as a fertiliser.There were other highly inflammable fuels nearby possibly rocket fuel which is why in the footage you can see grey snoke then red, then a vapour going up with a huge amount of energy before dissipating

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  • nukecad
    replied
    Look up "leper ships" (single 'p').

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  • Chester Perry
    replied
    The biggest question is why the cargo was not sold on at time of discharge or even shortly after. It is common place that cargo is often sold and resold several times whilst in transit for various reasons such as bankruptcy, fluctuating commodity prices etc etc. As example cargo may be en route from one country to another and then the vessel will divert to accommodate new port of destination.

    Very out of the norm that the cargo would sit in storage for so long as no dock dues / storage fees would be earnt. As example if it was discharged and the cargo could not be sold or if it came to it given away for free with buyer to pay only handling and shipping it would be disposed of to free up the space.

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  • nukecad
    replied
    What Chester says is very relevent.

    There international laws/agreements about labling.

    You can put the correct hazard warning on, but if someone decides to ignore those warnings for expediency then they might as well not be there

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    To be fair the photos of the bags show that they were labelled correctly (High Density Ammonium Nitrate).
    But the place they were stored was basically a "dump" for property that had no other home and there wasn't anywhere appropriate to store it safely.
    It was taken off a Russian ship that was abandoned by its crew when the owner went bust.

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  • Chester Perry
    replied
    Originally posted by Gordon999 View Post
    The Lebanon explosions has caused atleast 100deaths, 4000 injured and 300000 homes damaged. The cause of the explosions was attributed to storage of ammonium nitrate in the docks area. I expect this chemical would have been in bags labelled "fertiliser" and not labelled as "dangerous explosive material". Can this disaster happen in UK ?
    Yes!!!

    I am a marine cargo surveyor and consultant and part of my role includes conducting inspections to randomly selected dangerous goods container shipments (assume approx 10 x containers per vessel which may be loading 150).

    The IMDG Code stipulates strict guidelines for packing, storage, labelling of different hazzardous cargo types and what must be kept separated etc etc.

    Lets just say that the fail rate of dangerous goods inspections runs at approx 50% upwards of all those inspected.

    Each Shipping Line conduct inspections at Ports as do the Marine Coast Guard Agency and things have not improved in the 30 years that I have been involved.

    Reasons for standards are at the point of loading (factories and inland depots) and are down to poor training, ignorance of the IMDG code and sometimes just trying to get away with it.

    It would be unprofessional of me to name companies but as an example a major brand within the hairspray / beauty market had a container randomly selected for inspection.

    I failed it and once my report was sent on via the shipping line the shipping manager of the factory called me to ask what was required. I explained and given that once I have failed a unit any work must be completed in advance of any movement. As things work this must be done by the Port and the cost would be approx £140.00.

    He asked how the containers are selected and how many are looked at. The conversation ended with him saying that he has approx. X amount of containers being shipped from the Port a month and that if it was random and by chance his may be inspected it would be worth the risk.

    This is the man in charge of the export operation who signed the dangerous goods declaration note to say that the IMDG Code has been applied correctly.

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  • Gordon999
    replied
    The death toll from last week’s explosion at the Beirut port has risen to 171, outgoing Lebanese Health Minister Hassan Hamad said Tuesday.



    Speaking after his meeting with WHO emergency official Rick Brennan, Hamad told reporters that "the number of missing people ranges between 30 and 40."


    Regarding the injured, he said: "About 1,500 need delicate treatment," noting that "120 of them are still in intensive care".


    The Health Ministry, he added, "has received from the Lebanese Army list of health donations received from various countries," which will be distributed to medical facilities across the country.

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  • Gordon999
    replied
    Latest figures are 154 deaths and 5000 injured. But 300000 homes damaged by one big explosion is horrific for the local residents.

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  • nukecad
    replied
    It usually has to be mixed with someting else to become explosive like that.
    (Various things some more common than others but I'm not saying how to make explosive).

    It's triggering it to explode and that trigger is what's what happened here.
    (Bad as an accident or neglect - really hope it wasn't deliberate).

    Apparently that lot had been stored in the warehouse for years.
    Was it in drums or sacks?
    Probably sacks, in drums it wouldn't have got contominated and who knows what other chemicals were in there that could have leaked into sacks of fertiliser over those years just waiting for a fire to trigger them to explode.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Not sure about the image sizes, but this is the Beirut damage mapped over central London.
    Half of the Beirut explosion went out to sea because of where the storage unit was located.

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  • Gordon999
    started a topic Lebanon explosions

    Lebanon explosions

    The Lebanon explosions has caused atleast 100deaths, 4000 injured and 300000 homes damaged. The cause of the explosions was attributed to storage of ammonium nitrate in the docks area. I expect this chemical would have been in bags labelled "fertiliser" and not labelled as "dangerous explosive material". Can this disaster happen in UK ?

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