To be a guarantor

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    #16
    Wot Lawcruncher said, above. I have been using his form of guarantee for nearly ten years now and it is excellent.

    I would however add that in student joint tenancies at least, damages are nearly always claimed, in the first instance, by the joint tenancy deposit, usually the equivalent of a months rent per joint tenant. You may have to enter into dispute with them via the deposit protection scheme, but if you have appropriate evidence you can get it back.

    Only when the damage exceeds the deposit value, and the Ts lack the means to pay, might you need to start chasing Gs, and then it;s the same principle as explained above.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #17
      As the parent of a student you are held to ransom and have very little choice. However the courts have been rather reluctant to enforce guarantor agreements and IME they are often done so badly that it would be difficult to get a court to enforce them.

      We have been fortunate in that our child had decent landlords but students are seen as easy pickings by some landlords who claim for thinking like cleaning a place that wasnt clean when they moved in and pre-existing damage.. Usual advice applies - tenants should photograph everything when they move in, document the ways in which the inventory departs from the truth - and be trained that it doesnt matter whose fault it is they will be paying for any damage so they need to keep their flatmates under control.

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