Fire safety for non-HMOs. What do YOU do?

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    Fire safety for non-HMOs. What do YOU do?

    HMO regs ( applicable to all tenacies of 3 or more people who are not related)are very clear on what fire precautions need to be taken.

    I am interested what landlords/agents are currently providing for non-hmo tenants. My research seems to suggest that providing a fire blanket and extingisher in the kitchen and a smoke detector on each level is satisfactory.

    Landlords & Agents, do you do this? If not, why not? Tenants can contribute to this post with their own experiences.
    All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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    #2
    I thought to qualify as an HMO it also had to be on three or more floors no? That is what the Council told me just after the law came in, has it changed? I have 4 tenants in a house on 2 floors with shared amenities (friends) and no locks on the doors and thought that didn't qualify.

    Dave

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      #3
      It is a HMO but does not require a Mandatory licence. All the HMO regs still apply. The council are only likely to hassle you if an incident happens or your tenants complain. Then they could serve you a notice to upgrade to all the fire specifications etc., overcrowding issues, management issues etc

      Anyway...what fire precautions do you use?
      All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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        #4
        Originally posted by Bel View Post
        Then they could serve you a notice to upgrade to all the fire specifications etc., overcrowding issues, management issues etc
        Then it would be emptied as quickly as possible and placed straight on the market! The upgrades would cost tens of thousands.

        I use smoke alarms on both floors, fire extinguishers on both floors and in kitchen, fire blanket, windows that will open wide enough to permit escape, fire doors on bedrooms and kitchen. I also make every tenant read a safety leaflet I have provided for them, I also insist they have no locks on their doors so they can't get locked in.

        It is after all my property and I would like the damage kept to a minimum

        Dave

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          #5
          Originally posted by Bludnok View Post
          I also make every tenant read a safety leaflet I have provided for them,
          What.......out loud?
          All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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            #6
            Fortunately (not necessarily for me) all my properties are recently rewired, which means sufficient power outlets - a lot of trouble comes from overloading outlets.
            Heat (fire) detectors are now mandatory under B.Regs for kitchens, when rewiring I must say I've never put in extinguishers or blankets.
            Smoke detectors often seem to be a matter of "..how many do you want...let's put one there and one there, that seems about right" as far as electricians go. In fact, it's very important to get them sited properly (see B.Regs http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/upl..._ADB1_2006.pdf) to be useful. That's "useful" as in lifesaving, of course.

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              #7
              Fireproof ceilings, fireproof flooring, mains operated alarms, potentially basins in every bedroom, the list seems endless. It's on the website

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                #8

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                  #9
                  Guys....Great discussion, but any ideas on what you consider a minimum in a non-hmo property also appreciated.
                  All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Bel View Post
                    Guys....Great discussion, but any ideas on what you consider a minimum in a non-hmo property also appreciated.
                    Surely it depends on the house.

                    Are we talking about people sharing a standard house or self contained units?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by ah84 View Post
                      Surely it depends on the house.

                      Are we talking about people sharing a standard house or self contained units?
                      Whatever your personal experience is of.....
                      All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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