Hard wired smoke alarms

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    Hard wired smoke alarms

    Hello,

    I just bought and refurbished a new house and one of the list of jobs on my builders list was hard wired smoke alarms. He went bankrupt, stopped returning my calls and now I have virtually completed the refurb. I have only just noticed the smoke alarms he fitted are battery ones.

    I have two questions:

    How much should it costs to fit three smoke alarms. I have had a quote for £210 which seemes excessive to me. (Bear in mind labour is cheaper in Sheffield)

    Are there alternatives?

    I remember seeing at a landlord meeting seeing some really clever alternative to hard wired smoke alarms that didn't mean messing up your plaster, lifting floorboards but they were just as good. I have no idea what I have done with the information leaflet I picked up. Any one know what I am talking about?

    Shona
    I'm trying to raise awareness of Myotonic Dystrophy, Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) and In vitro fertilisation (IVF). Follow my PGD blog and please pass it on to any one you know who has an interest in PGD or IVF.

    #2
    I think you are reffering to radio linked wireless detectors?

    Comment


      #3
      Shona, I think the things you are refering to fit in the light sockets between the socket and bulb - a fire angel.

      I don't know if they would be acceptable, but here is a supplier, others may be cheaper/better http://www.find-me-a-gift.co.uk/smoke-alarm.asp

      Comment


        #4
        Tesco used to stock them and may still do. The idea is that the unit:
        a. is inserted in the ceiling rose socket;
        b. has its own light socket into which the bulb is inserted; and
        c. contains an inbuilt battery that recharges every time the light is 'on'.
        JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
        1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
        2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
        3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
        4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

        Comment


          #5
          The original quote sounds on the steep side, but was it for linked mains-powered alarms? That's the optimum set-up; it means that if one alarm sounds then all of them go off together. However it does mean that not only does the installer have to connect them to the mains (finding a suitable location and circuit to wire them in to) but there also needs to be a new, dedicated cable run installed which interconnects all the alarms. They can be therefore pretty awkward to fit, obviously; especially if you're installing over several floors of a building, and more so if you want concealed (ie not surface-mounted) wiring).

          Optimally you'd also have a circuit dedicated to the smoke alarms, which would mean running new cable back to the consumer unit (fuse box) - again ramping up the cost.

          So, linked alarms will be more expensive to install; hower as advised earlier, you can get wireless alarms which link without the interlinking cables. More expensive kit, but they cut down on the labour.

          Those alarms which plug into light sockets are certainly available; personally I wouldn't go for them in a tenanted property as I think they are too easy to unplug and disable for whatever reason. They won't be interlinked either (unless you can also get radio-linking versions; but I've never heard of them). However, these alarms are the only way you can have mains-powered ones without any disturbance to the floorboards/plaster etc!

          Comment


            #6
            Plus the alarms which plug into light sockets are less likely to be interfered-with, given that there is no battery capable of being removed for use elsewhere (a regular reason why battery-powered smoke alarms fail to work).
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment

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