No protective equipotential bonding

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    No protective equipotential bonding

    Hello just been speaking to the gas man who has come round to my flat because the flat has no protective equipotential bonding and he needs to run a new pipe all the way through the flat ripping floors up, does this mean my flat has failed its gas safety certificate?

    #2
    Yes.
    You could ask him to be doubly sure.
    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

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      #3
      Originally posted by barryleng1 View Post
      Hello just been speaking to the gas man who has come round to my flat because the flat has no protective equipotential bonding and he needs to run a new pipe all the way through the flat ripping floors up, does this mean my flat has failed its gas safety certificate?
      No it won't fail your gas safety check (at least mine were not), but you will be issued with a notice telling you what the gas engineer found.

      The work to correct this is to run electrical cable to the gas pipe in order to earth the gas pipe - the cabling could be run along the skirting, but I accept that its better laid under the floorboards.

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        #4
        Originally posted by HairyLandlord View Post
        No it won't fail your gas safety check (at least mine were not), but you will be issued with a notice telling you what the gas engineer found.

        The work to correct this is to run earth cable to the gas pipe in order to earth the gas pipe - the cabling could be run along the skirting, but I accept that its better laid under the floorboards.
        The OP should talk to a sparky. The earth cable has a maximum length they are allowed to travel to meet this requirement (I don't remember the exact length, but I had this problem with my electrical system/Gas piping at home last year...).

        Also the OP mentions ripping up piping (gas pipes?)? Is this correct, just because of the earthing for the electrics to the gas pipes?

        Yes, I can understand putting in new pipes due to gas pressure issues, but not because of an equipotential issue.

        Keen to hear other opinions here...

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          #5
          It should not need a new gas pipe or an old one ripping up, but laying of a thick electrical cable (or if possible, e.g. on a ground floor flat, a stake to earth the gas piping). Certainly sounds more like a job for an electrician.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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            #6
            They just eased the rule on earth bonding in the new 17th Edition of IEEE regs

            Check with a sparky as I am not sure there is specific requirement for gas instalations. Bonding is there to ensure a route to earth which 1) allows the RCD to work properly 2) causes an electrical fault to short to earth rather than through you

            As I recall you need to run a 10 square mm earth cable between all water instalations and a suitable earth point, it is normal to bond gas hobs but boilers for example are earthed through their electrical supply.

            My certs are well out of date but I am not sure replacing a pipe is required

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              #7
              Ha! It wasn't that many years ago that connecting an earth or any form of electrical wiring to a gas pipe was a complete and utter no-no.

              P.P.
              Any information given in this post is based on my personal experience as a landlord, what I have learned from this and other boards and elsewhere. It is not to be relied on. Definitive advice is only available from a Solicitor or other appropriately qualified person.

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                #8
                re the above - gas man here today and in his sheet has written about no protective equipotential bonding - as we have concrete floors can anyone say how this problem can be sorted

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                  #9
                  "on a ground floor flat, a stake to earth the gas piping" -
                  No you cannot do this as you are not trying to earth it; it is coming out of the earth so is already earthed. You are trying to keep it at the same voltage as the electrical earth, which under fault conditions won't always be zero. If you don't bond the gas pipe, it will remain at zero volts (and everything it touches), and if the electrical earth is substantially higher under fault conditions, you could have 200v in one hand, and zero volts in the other hand. If you are lucky an RCD might limit the time, but it won't limit the magnitude of the current passing through you.






                  • "They just eased the rule on earth bonding in the new 17th Edition of IEEE regs"
                    We are now on the 18th edition and it is still a basic requirement

                    "Bonding is there to ensure a route to earth"
                    Nope

                    "allows the RCD to work properly"
                    Nope

                    "causes an electrical fault to short to earth rather than through you"
                    Nope

                    "it is normal to bond gas hobs"
                    Nope, nor boilers

                    "My certs are well out of date"
                    Yep

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