Carbon Monoxide detectors, England.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Common sense also applies - if there's a release of carbon dioxide would there be a problem?

    In a hallway, probably no - no one's likely to succumb to CO poisoning while oblivious to its effects.
    People die from CO poisoning falling asleep sitting down or lying down.

    In a loft, it probably depends where the CO would flow, it being heavier than air.

    You don't need hardwired alarms unless it's an HMO.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
      Common sense also applies - if there's a release of carbon dioxide would there be a problem?
      Obviously not, unless it's in very large quantities ;-)
      Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
      In a hallway, probably no - no one's likely to succumb to CO poisoning while oblivious to its effects.
      People die from CO poisoning falling asleep sitting down or lying down.
      But the alarm will still be audible from someone in the next room - it makes sense to have the detector in the same room as the appliance as that is where the highest concentration will be.

      Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
      In a loft, it probably depends where the CO would flow, it being heavier than air.
      It isn't - it will tend to diffuse more than settle. Unless you are talking about CO2 again!

      "Because carbon monoxide is slightly lighter than air and also because it may be found with warm, rising air, detectors should be placed on a wall about 5 feet above the floor. "


      Comment


        #18
        You're right - brain fart!
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment

        Latest Activity

        Collapse

        • Reply to PAT Failure - Gas hob
          by nukecad
          In general -

          If it is plugged into a socket then it comes under PAT.
          If it is hard wired in then it comes under EICR.

          Think of a free standing electric cooker.
          Lower powered ones, under 3kW, that have a plug are not part of the electrical installation, they don't...
          13-08-2022, 09:35 AM
        • PAT Failure - Gas hob
          by MikeGreene
          My agents have recently taken over carrying out PAT Tests for my properties - it is a Selective Licence scheme area, and PAT Tests are a requirement.
          They have already found (unsurprisingly, given how many gunk up etc) two properties where the ignition button is not working and have failed the...
          11-08-2022, 12:48 PM
        • Reply to PAT Failure - Gas hob
          by Firebug
          It's not PAT it's the in service inspection and testing of electrical equipment and fixed equipment does come under it. The hobs would fail the functional test aspect of the procedure....
          12-08-2022, 20:56 PM
        • Reply to PAT Failure - Gas hob
          by royw
          I wouldn't expect a gas hob to need a PAT test either, it's a fixed item not a portable one. As long as it's passed the GSC I think that's all you need.
          12-08-2022, 15:07 PM
        • Reply to Elements of a proper gas safety check
          by gnvqsos
          ash72,

          They should do a flue analysis to ensure the gas is fully combusted ,and measure efficiency of the boiler..
          12-08-2022, 14:47 PM
        • Elements of a proper gas safety check
          by AndrewDod
          Any gas competent people out there who can confirm exactly what a gas engineer should be doing as part of a boiler service and gas safety certificate.

          Just had an incident where a (smallish) gas leak in a wall was found a few weeks after such a service. It was discovered by the energy...
          18-07-2022, 11:43 AM
        • Reply to Elements of a proper gas safety check
          by gnvqsos
          A tightness test at the meter should precede any work on gas pipes and devices.. If no leaks before the work commences, any subsequent leak is attributable to that fitter .I would guess that meter installers are not trained to a hih standard and have not learnt first principles, as a Gas sake engineer...
          12-08-2022, 14:45 PM
        • Asbestos Survey Report
          by Perce
          Hello

          I am selling a flat in a residential block of flats. My buyer's solicitor has requested an asbestos report saying the building was built before 2000 so it is a legal requirement to have it.

          The building was built in 1998 and the Management Company did not do it. ...
          10-08-2022, 14:44 PM
        • Reply to Asbestos Survey Report
          by Perce
          Thank you All.

          NSUK have now done an independent survey of the common parts for me very quickly.

          The management company is now also doing the survey but I did not want to wait for their report.

          I have asked the surveyor if it was a legal requirement...
          12-08-2022, 11:33 AM
        • Reply to PAT Failure - Gas hob
          by nukecad
          If you do disconnect it then I'd remove the igniter button from the hole and replace it with a plastic blanking plug.

          That way it's obvious that there is no igniter and not simply a broken one.
          12-08-2022, 11:10 AM
        Working...
        X