Tenants won't comply with Fire Risk Assessment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Tenants won't comply with Fire Risk Assessment

    Feedback or guidance appreciated. I am the resident owner of a flat in a building comprising of five flats. Three of the flats are let out with two of the flats totally disregarding a December 2021 fire risk assessment. The FRA made it clear no personal items like shoes – for which there are many pairs scattered around as well as other personal stuff – can be left in communal areas. I have politely asked the tenants to comply with the FRA and remove these from the communal areas but I am ignored.

    All three landlords have no interest in the issue but in the event of a catastrophe I understand non-compliance could have financial and/or legal consequences. How do I encourage the tenants to comply? Keeping personal items in communal areas is prohibited by the lease but, again, the landlord owners do not wish to upset their tenants.

    With thanks

    London65

    #2
    Send them a final warning letter, stating that if they don't comply then any items found in the communal hallways will be removed without notice. Then do it, they will soon get the message.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Ash. It may come to this. The (buy to let) landlords main interest is reliable regular rent cheques from their tenants – and happy tenants. The tenants dislike anything that limits their ability to behave how they like. I want a reasonable relationship with the tenants but not at the expense of compromising the FRA.

      Comment


        #4
        Think freeholder (a company ?) should write to owners/landlords mentioning forfeit & liabilities, possible void insurance , also to tenants/occupiers pointing out risks, liabilities. Less from you/just a neighbour....

        Perhaps local fire service might have some advice (general and also specific..) and write/visit?
        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

        Comment


          #5
          On a Commercial Property I rented out an Inspector for my Insurance Company did an inspection and said "I want to see a Fire Risk Assessment and An Electrical Safety Certificate"
          The tenant refused to have done any repairs to the Electrical Equipment to get a Certificate and was not interested in a Fire Risk Assessment
          At the time I was working for a very large Insurance Company handling claims. and I asked one of the Loss Adjusters what would happen if there was a Fire and the answer was that if the fire was due to an Electrical fault the Insurance Company could refuse a claim.
          You have to be so careful.

          One thing I did I spent £200 on Fire Extinguishers and Bells etc.
          What you could do is put a load of Fire Extinguishers in the Communal Areas.

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks TAFL and AFM. Legally the house operates via a Trust – four trustees of whom I am one. The other three trustees are the three buy-to-let landlords. So the majority of the trustees have little interest in complying with the terms of our buildings insurance, the FRA and leasehold law. I have already taken one of the trustees twice to the First Tier Property Tribunal to sue them successfully for unpaid service charges so I am readying myself for more conflict, which I would prefer to avoid. We are putting in a wireless smoke alarm in the communal areas in the next few weeks plus fire doors but this is only being done because one of the trustees wishes to sell and cannot sell while the fire safety compliance is so poor.

            Comment


              #7
              Do you mean the freehold is owned by the trust? Or that there's no freehold?
              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

              Comment


                #8
                The five leaseholders are joint freeholders. In other words, we all have a 20% share each in the freehold. By law, you can only have four trustees maximum. So one leaseholder is not a trustee. Hope that makes sense.

                Comment

                Latest Activity

                Collapse

                Working...
                X