EICR problem - how many do ineed?

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    EICR problem - how many do ineed?

    Hello - i've trawled the gov.uk website looking for an answer, but cannot find one, so i wondered if anyone here would be good enough and knowledgeable enough to help me.

    Last week using a 'booking service' i paid a very competitive fixed-price for an EICR to be carried out at the small modern one bedroom flat that i rent out. When the electrician arrived he rang to tell me that because the storage heaters were on a separate fuse-box, i would need to pay him a further £80 for a second EICR. He also wanted £80 to replace the circuit breaker on the bathroom circuit with a RCBO in order to provide a 'satisfactory' EICR certificate for that fuse-box.

    I felt rather put on the spot because nowhere had i seen stipulated a requirement for an EICR for each fuse-box in a dwelling, including in the terms of the service provider and subsequently on the government website. Or anywhere else for that matter.

    The upshot was that i have been provided with an 'Unsatisfactory' EICR that makes no mention of the storage heaters.

    I'm not an electrician and am prepared to take the need for a RCBO at face value. However, i am very sceptical about the other aspects of this transaction and would appreciate any guidance hat could be offered here.

    Thanks.

    #2
    What you have there is an unsatisfactory electrician / service provider.

    What I would do is find an electrician who will give you a quote for the EICR for the flat, telling them there are two fuse boxes, so they can give you a sensible price.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      My advice is to ask for the report then decide what to do.

      This is why I won't do EICRs without seeing pictures of the fuseboards

      And don't go cheap, because they are loss leaders

      Comment


        #4
        Many thanks for the replies.

        Just so people know, i wasn't hiding the fact that there were two fuse-boxes; i've barely been in the flat the last five years and had forgotten, not that i would have realised it was relevant to mention. And i was certainly never asked. Surely i can't be the only landlord with storage heaters on a separate fuse-box? (The original installation was in 2006).

        And just to be clear, i have paid for the EICR and received it. However, AFAICS it makes no mention of the storage heaters, so i feel it is incomplete.

        But the question i'm really keen to have answered is whether or not it is necessary to provide an additional EICR for each fusebox.

        Comment


          #5
          An EICR is based on a test of a property, not a fuse box or a circuit.
          The electrician was trying to boost the cost of the job and has delivered you a pointless certificate.

          To be honest, it's good that you spotted it, because it means the test is incomplete (and you could easily have missed it and assumed it was fine).
          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

          Comment


            #6
            I just used one of these online companies and got into difficulties too - I wouldn't recommend in future. My issue was that the cost of the EICR is so low that the electrician packs lots of jobs into his day. Then, if there is anything to fix they have to come back. You are then strapped to use them again, else pay someone for the full cost of doing the EICR again.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
              An EICR is based on a test of a property, not a fuse box or a circuit.
              The electrician was trying to boost the cost of the job and has delivered you a pointless certificate.

              To be honest, it's good that you spotted it, because it means the test is incomplete (and you could easily have missed it and assumed it was fine).
              Thanks very much for this. I do intend to take this up with the 'supplier' - do you know of any official online statement of the regulation t that would confirm this?

              I just used one of these online companies and got into difficulties too - I wouldn't recommend in future. My issue was that the cost of the EICR is so low that the electrician packs lots of jobs into his day. Then, if there is anything to fix they have to come back. You are then strapped to use them again, else pay someone for the full cost of doing the EICR again.
              I'm not sure this is quite correct. I believe you can employ any qualified electrician to carry out remedial work and provided you have evidence of this, it is not necessary to commission another EICR.

              Comment


                #8
                Hum - that's an interesting point but how many lettings agencies will accept an unsatisfactory EICR from spark 1 and a couple of MWC's from Spark 2 as "satisfactory"

                The way I read the legislation is that a "satisfactory" EICR is required

                Also OP - check what the scope of the EICR you have says - if it says installation, then it should include both fuseboards, if it excludes the E7 board then you will need to get the other board tested.

                Poor knowledge has brought you to here .........

                The electrical installation of a domestic property includes all fuseboards / circuits on the property IMHO

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by autolycusLZ View Post
                  Thanks very much for this. I do intend to take this up with the 'supplier' - do you know of any official online statement of the regulation t that would confirm this?
                  The test is of an "Installation".
                  An Installation is what's entered on the top right of the EICR.

                  I don't have any formal definition of what comprises an installation, but if the EICR is an address, it should be all of the electrical equipment at that address.
                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Neelix,

                    Well, it's certainly a want of knowledge that has brought me to here :-)

                    The information i have found on the .gov website says that an EICR must be produced and If the report requires remedial work or further investigation, landlords must provide written confirmation that the work has been carried out to their tenant and to the local authority within 28 days of completing the work.

                    It also says pretty much the same in a later paragraph:

                    If the report shows that remedial work or further investigation is required, as set out above, landlords must complete this work within 28 days or any shorter period if specified as necessary in the report. Landlords must then provide written confirmation that the work has been carried out to their tenant and to the local authority within 28 days.

                    I would have thought that if it's sufficient for a local authority, it should be sufficient for a letting agency.

                    I can't find anywhere that says a "satisfactory EICR" per se is required, or that remedial work must be carried out by the contractor that produced the EICR, but i'd welcome a link to any official notification that shows that it is.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Op you need to check with your lettings agency what they will accept

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                        The test is of an "Installation".
                        An Installation is what's entered on the top right of the EICR.

                        I don't have any formal definition of what comprises an installation, but if the EICR is an address, it should be all of the electrical equipment at that address.
                        Thanks - that's the way i see it too.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by autolycusLZ View Post

                          Thanks - that's the way i see it too.

                          Nope.

                          An EICR scope is defined on the EICR, it is not just used for PRS. It can be for one circuit or an entire installation.

                          Can I ask what did the OP expect to get for £80. Im a landlord and electrician and it takes me about 3-4hrs onsite to do the EICR then about another 1.5hrs to write up, then there is travelling to site, loading and unloading the van, tools, insurance etc. If you had a proper EICR that took then at £80 your electricians rate is about £10 per hour after all expenses etc. I bet you went with them because they were cheap? You really cant be that surprised when they make up the money elsewhere?

                          I think im pretty good at doing EICR's but I charge between £175 an £215 which is about average for a decent EICR. For other electrical work I charge £50 for the first hour then £35 per hour after, you can do the math, even at what I charge for an EICR I get usually less than my hourly rate, if your paying even less then there will be a reason...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by catdog1121 View Post
                            An EICR scope is defined on the EICR, it is not just used for PRS. It can be for one circuit or an entire installation.
                            You know more about this than me.

                            If the installation being tested was one circuit in a property, presumably that's what you'd put in the "Details of the Installation" box in part one of the form?

                            So if the "Details of the Installation" says 11 Address Lane, you'd assume that the installation was the whole electrical infrastructure of that address, and if the intent was just to test and document one circuit, you'd presumably put something along the lines of "The Storage Heater circuit only at 11 Address Lane"?

                            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The EICR should define the scope and also define what hadn’t been tested

                              if a property has 2 fuseboard s and the 2nd one hasn’t been tested, then it needs to be

                              i had a discussion with a client last year, they asked me to inspect a 4 bed house with 8 circuits. On arrival I discovered a submain and a swimming pool complex - and when I said the pool had to be done he tried to say it wasn’t part of the domestic residence so didn’t need testing - needless to say I dug my heels in and insisted it had to be tested - which is how it was done

                              Comment

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