Gas Safety - legal requirement?

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  • Gas Safety - legal requirement?

    Hi,

    I recently moved into new property and the landlord has arranged for British Gas to come out tomorrow. He has just emailed me and said that British Gas will tell me the status of the boiler and if I am happy with that, there is no need to charge for a certificate.

    Is this ok? I always thought a gas safety certificate had to be obtained on paper.

    I don't want to upset new landlord and incur the cost of a certificate if it isn't neccessary. On the other hand, if it is a legal requirement, I don't want him to get into trouble for not providing one.

    Any thoughts??

    Many thanks, Jo

  • #2
    it is a legal requirement for a landlord to produce a Landlords Gas Safety Certificate annually. This can only be produced by a CORGI registered gas engineer. The certificate is in three parts, one for the tenant, one for the landlord, one for the engineer. You must be given your copy of the certificate no later than 14 days after the inspection.

    ask to see the gas man's "Corgi Badge"

    Landlords should pay for this not tenants !!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jo77 View Post
      I recently moved into new property and the landlord has arranged for British Gas to come out tomorrow. He has just emailed me and said that British Gas will tell me the status of the boiler and if I am happy with that, there is no need to charge for a certificate.
      Sounds somewhat odd. What's "status of the boiler" mean? What is he asking this BG guy to do, if not do a proper landlord's safety check? Why isn't he getting it done properly?

      I suppose maybe the BG guy is a mate doing a favour, and might well be CORGI-registered but doesn't have the required landlord's safety testing qualification (most don't - all CORGIs are not equal!). Whatever, your landlord's breaking the law and being a total prat if he thinks it's OK to save a few quid this way, and it should certainly say something to you about his professionalism and general attitude towards being a landlord.

      Have a read of http://www.trustcorgi.com/consumer/iamatenant.htmx

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jo77 View Post
        Hi,

        I recently moved into new property and the landlord has arranged for British Gas to come out tomorrow. He has just emailed me and said that British Gas will tell me the status of the boiler and if I am happy with that, there is no need to charge for a certificate.

        Is this ok? I always thought a gas safety certificate had to be obtained on paper.

        I don't want to upset new landlord and incur the cost of a certificate if it isn't neccessary. On the other hand, if it is a legal requirement, I don't want him to get into trouble for not providing one.

        Any thoughts??

        Many thanks, Jo

        If your property (and therefore boiler) is brand new, one of our Corgi engineers explained that you dont need a certificate until its a year old. Nevertheless, we always obtain one whether its new or not and the landlords pay for it.

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        • #5
          if a new boiler is installed, it has to be installed by a corgi registered gas engineer - it is no skin off their nose to write a Landlords Safety Certificate on installation - i dont know if they legally have to or not, - but whenever i get a new boiler i get a CORGI landlords cert on installation.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by susanne View Post
            if a new boiler is installed, it has to be installed by a corgi registered gas engineer - it is no skin off their nose to write a Landlords Safety Certificate on installation - i dont know if they legally have to or not, - but whenever i get a new boiler i get a CORGI landlords cert on installation.
            The installation certificate is proof of saftey for the first 12 months from the date of installation. Another CP12 ( Gas Cert ) is not required.

            The LL in this case is breaking the law and could face a very heavy fine or even imprisonment. The OP on the other hand could end up DEAD!
            Advise your LL that the correct paperword is required and if this is not produced then you will refer the matter to your local E.H.O.

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            • #7
              Hope it's ok to ask a question on the back of this.....

              How soon after you (the tenant) moves in must the landlord do this? Obviously asap however is there a limit?

              Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                if there is not a current certificate - you should not move in .......

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by susanne View Post
                  if there is not a current certificate - you should not move in .......
                  thanks for that info.

                  we've just moved out of a property after 13 months. Our first rental one for years. We're having lots of issues regarding getting our deposit back. I'm in the process of compiling evidence that the whole let has been mishandled. Don't know what good that will do me but it's showing me that in retrospect I think we've been far too flexible about things. and more than a tad naive.

                  The gas cert was done properly but a few weeks after we took up residency. It resulted in the gas fire being condemned (small gas leak) and disconnected straight away. Landlord never replaced it.

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                  • #10
                    It is illegal for a landlord (or his agent) to permit a tenant to take up residence in a dwelling containing working gas appliances for which a Corgi landlords gas safety certificate is not not current. All good agents require a copy of the current certificate before proceding to find a new tenant for a landlord.
                    As stated above this does not apply to the first year of a new installation made by an appropriately Corgi registered engineer. The completion certificate for the installation fulfills this function.

                    P.P.
                    Any information given in this post is based on my personal experience as a landlord, what I have learned from this and other boards and elsewhere. It is not to be relied on. Definitive advice is only available from a Solicitor or other appropriately qualified person.

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                    • #11
                      On a course I attended recently, it was said that in addition to the annual check, a check has to be done whenever a new tenant moves in. Is this correct? I guess it would be in case the old tenant has tampered with anything.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by caroline7758 View Post
                        On a course I attended recently, it was said that in addition to the annual check, a check has to be done whenever a new tenant moves in. Is this correct? I guess it would be in case the old tenant has tampered with anything.
                        No, it's good practice for the reason you state, but isn't a legal requirement. Agents obviously like it to be done, as it's a good back-covering exercise and the LL pays for it, not them; and I'm sure some will not be above telling the LL it's a must when it's actually just their own internal policy.

                        Personally, I visually check the gas appliances over along with everything else when I inspect the property after a tenant's left, and providing there's nothing to give me cause for concern I wouldn't consider getting another check done until it's due anyway.

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                        • #13
                          it is possible that when OP moved in there was a current certificate in force, but maybe the previous tenant walked off with it - thats happened to me before - so i would then photocopy my own copy for the next tenant

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by susanne View Post
                            it is possible that when OP moved in there was a current certificate in force, but maybe the previous tenant walked off with it - thats happened to me before - so i would then photocopy my own copy for the next tenant
                            Possible, but it sounds like this LL is trying to save money and hasn't got his gas cert for this property. We always have our certs done annually by the same company so there's no gap and we never allow a tenant in until there's a current cert.

                            Imagine if there was a problem and someone died - it doesn't bear thinking about.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I very recently purchased my Sister-in-law’s house to prevent her from being repossessed. She of course remained resident during the purchase, but I had to arrange for gas and electricity certification before the purchase completed, at my cost of course. Her solicitor was even starting to hold things up until the checks and tenancy agreement were finished. Quite a peculiar situation, but my stance was that the checks needed to be made and the delay really didn’t cost me anything. We have now completed but with outstanding electrical work to be done.

                              The outcome of the electrical check was that the consumer unit needed replacing, and given its age and lack of RCD protection I’m happy for it to be changed. The sale has completed now but we are not starting the tenancy until the electrical work and certification is complete. I assume that is legally acceptable?
                              I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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