What does an EICR involve?

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    What does an EICR involve?

    I understand that from June 2020 I need an Electrical Installation Condition Report?

    What does this actually involve and how detailed are the tests? I have a house that (I think) was last re-wired in the 1990s, there are no obvious, major issues but there are a few items that have been changed in the last 30 years that I’m not sure about. Specifically…
    • Surface mounted socket where the cable is nailed (with cable clips) to the skirting board (no conduit)
    • Electric towel rail with a cable (in a conduit) that runs to a switch in a bathroom.
    • Outside electric security light with normal domestic interior wires that’s aren’t in conduit and have been exposed to the sun.

    I have no paperwork with the wiring, what wiring I’ve had done has been done by professional electricians. I’ve had a retired electrician look over the wiring over he’s happy everything’s safe, but he has warned me that he’s no idea what regulations may have been changed in the last 15 years.

    I’d prefer to get my wiring up to scratch before paying for an inspection – I don’t want to pay for a 2nd one later. Is it a detailed check that everything is 100% in line with current 2020 regulations? Or a more basic check that everything was wired to the correct standard when it was installed? Or a simple ‘would I be happy if my mum lived in this house’ test?


    #2
    if it was done correctly in the 90's then it will still pass

    Things that can cause issues:
    No RCD / supplimentary bonding in bathroom
    No main gas bond
    No water bond (if metal incoming pipe)

    See best practice guide

    https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.or...-4-issue-4.pdf

    Comment


      #3
      Depends on the electrician you get. In theory they should be happy with it done to any standard as long as it complied at the time of installation. In practice, you may encounter what I did: A threat to issue a 'failed' EICR unless you let him install a new metal fusebox.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by JK0 View Post
        Depends on the electrician you get. In theory they should be happy with it done to any standard as long as it complied at the time of installation. In practice, you may encounter what I did: A threat to issue a 'failed' EICR unless you let him install a new metal fusebox.
        Requiring someone to replace a consumer unit just because it is plastic is wrong,

        An install can pass easily of there is a plastic consumer unit (assuming other stuff is OK)

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by baldelectrician View Post

          Requiring someone to replace a consumer unit just because it is plastic is wrong,

          An install can pass easily of there is a plastic consumer unit (assuming other stuff is OK)
          I know. Not much I can do about it though, is there?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by JK0 View Post

            I know. Not much I can do about it though, is there?
            Yes there is.

            You could get another electrician, you could seek advice from the electricians governing body.

            Comment

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