British gas shut boiler, dangerous pipe and Tenant rights and reporting

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    British gas shut boiler, dangerous pipe and Tenant rights and reporting


    I have had ongoing boiler problems.

    Called British gas and they could not repair the boiler as they found that a wrong type of pipe was used for the gas to boiler and classed it as dangerous

    So have capped it off and given warning letter.

    I have had the property over 9 years and had a Landlord gas safety check every year by the same gas engineer , but he never said anything about this pipe. And have been supplied a certificate each year. So I believe all the gas boiler is all safe.

    The tenant have got very angry at this and have said they will be reporting the gas engineer and take him to court as he should have spotted this.

    Would like people views on this? What action should I or tenant take?


    As for the boiler I will be arrange a new boiler as this one too old.

    Thanks



    #2
    Let the tenants do what they want.

    Most landlords have a British Gas fitter Gas Safety story or two.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      I had a similar situation with a gas safety this year - a new gas fitter said the flue outlet was too close to a window and was a fail until I had an extension pipe fitted. I was happy to do this - safety should not be compromised - but 2 different fitters had signed it off over the last several years!

      Often these things seem to be down to interpretation. Get your boiler replaced and let the tenant do what they want.

      Comment


        #4
        If an engineer has passed it for 9 years then you're in the clear there, just do the current work requested.

        Comment


          #5
          What do they mean by "wrong type of pipe"?

          Is it simply the size of the pipe?
          Gas Safe reguations say that a combi-boiler should have a 'not smaller than 22mm' gas feed pipe.

          PS. It may seem strange but many brand new combi-boilers have a 15mm gas inlet connection, and so you need a reducing fitting which should be within about 1 meter of the boiler connection.
          Having too small a gas feed pipe for long runs can cause problems with combi-boilers hence the 1m restriction on 15mm pipe.

          It's a matter of debate whether an existing run of 15mm pipe needs changing to 22mm or above if you are not having any other work done, say having a replacement boiler fitted.
          If the supply pressure/flow at the boiler tests as OK then the engineer would be satisfied with the existing 15mm pipe. (Which seems to be the case with your previous GSCs).

          But if you are having a new boiler fitted, which seems likely if the current boiler cannot be repaired, then the supply pipe should be upgraded to at least 22mm at the same time.

          I doubt if the safety issue was with the pipe itself, it will have been with the boiler which has become unsafe and so they capped the existing pipe off to prevent anyone from using the boiler.

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks for comment guys.

            It was fitted with a pipe like this run from the gas pipe to the boiler.

            BG said that pipe is not suitable for gas, also it was close to a electric contact , which would be dangerous if a ignition occurred.

            https://www.screwfix.com/p/flexible-...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

            Comment


              #7
              The particular company mentioned are incentivised to create work. I would definitely get a second opinion.

              I dumped them after they informed tenants that if I removed a perfectly safe and good boiler then their energy efficiency would improve by 10% and that they should insist that I do so. Also plenty of powerflushes if you are on a contract with them.

              Comment


                #8
                So which jobsworth thought of that one? Most houses have a 15mm gas pipe so we have to pay to have it replaced. Many boilers are at the back of the house so this will be expensive and disruptive. Then when it gets to the boiler in many cases you have to put in a reducer to get it down to the 15mm connection on the boiler. So there's no point in the 25mm pipe except to give someone a job.
                What's wrong with a regulation that says it has to be 22mm only for those boilers that actually require it?
                The other way to avoid it to have a regular boiler not a combi though this will reduce the epc rating.
                It seems an unnecessary expense particularly when it seems likely we won't be using gas long term anyway.

                Comment


                  #9
                  The first line of the OP does say that there have been 'ongoing problems' with the boiler.

                  That may well have been because the pipe was not large enough diameter for most of the run so not enough gas was getting to the boiler when running at peak. (Usually for the hot water).
                  It's all to do with flow rates over longer pipe runs, not so much the size of the boiler inlet.
                  The larger the pipe diameter the higher the flow for a given pressure.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by sva14 View Post

                    It was fitted with a pipe like this run from the gas pipe to the boiler.

                    BG said that pipe is not suitable for gas, also it was close to a electric contact , which would be dangerous if a ignition occurred.

                    https://www.screwfix.com/p/flexible-...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
                    The Q&A for that product says "not suitable for gas".

                    Yours probably has the same restriction.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by MdeB View Post

                      The Q&A for that product says "not suitable for gas".

                      Yours probably has the same restriction.


                      Hi, yes that is what the BG engineer showed me on his mobile.

                      I spoke to the plumber who has been be doing the gas certs for me for past 9 years. He could not comment too much on the pipe as e not seen it, although I sent him the report.

                      He is not concerned about the tenant threat, he says like people stated above has come across BG engineer always shutting down boilers ,giving the power to the tenant saying need new boiler, better efficiency etc

                      The tenant has ask me for copies of the BG report and then been trying to contact BG, but as the job was under my name, they BG obviously cannot discuss anything with them!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I would suggest this tenant is angling for some kind of compensation and I'd be showing him the door ASAP. Also curious why BG couldn't just replace pipe and repair boiler whilst there unless they are angling for a bigger payday, I would certainly not use them for a replacement boiler IIWY

                        Comment


                          #13
                          TBH if you had that kind of pipe fitted then it's not right for gas and needs to be replaced.
                          The wall thickness on that type of flexible pipe is too thin and too easily punctured to use it for gas.

                          All other discussion is secondary.

                          And to be quite honest who cares what an old GSC says, It's the current one that matters.
                          It's a certificate to say that the gas installation is safe now and probably for the next 12 months, it's not what was going on in the past.

                          Laws and rules change over time, they are not normally applied retrospectively but if you make a change (like fitting a new boiler) then they will often apply to everything that might be involved and not just the the part that you change.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Kape65 View Post
                            I would suggest this tenant is angling for some kind of compensation and I'd be showing him the door ASAP. Also curious why BG couldn't just replace pipe and repair boiler whilst there unless they are angling for a bigger payday, I would certainly not use them for a replacement boiler IIWY
                            That’s true I should have thought of thatt, get him to install correct pipe, he just said as wrong pipe I cannot look at rest of system

                            see they were just pushing for a boiler, he almost got me to agree a date for a quote when I thought he was giving me a date to fix the pipe.

                            i think The tenant are angling compensation !

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Kape65 View Post
                              I would suggest this tenant is angling for some kind of compensation and I'd be showing him the door ASAP.
                              Hm. Tenant is told by someone he can reasonably assume is an expert that a gas installation is unsafe. Tenant not unreasonably concludes that there was a possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning or an explosion and gets angry. Conclusion: tenant wants compensation so serve section 21 notice.

                              Comment

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