Basement room fire risk....no means of escape

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  • Gyps
    started a topic Basement room fire risk....no means of escape

    Basement room fire risk....no means of escape

    I wonder if I could get some help with a basement room which is used as a bathroom however I have just learnt that is does not meet building regulations for fire and safety as there is no way a person could get out of the miniscule window and would be trapped....this has made me feel very nervous.

  • Fire Risk Assessor
    replied
    Originally posted by Milly26 View Post
    leaseholder64,

    If there was a fire on the stairs there would be no way for a person to get in or out....the stairs are the only exit and the window is too small to exit...will ask a surveyor now
    Escape windows are only acceptable where the floor height is less than 4.5m. (Normally ground and first). According to your theory there would be no building higher than 2 floors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fire Risk Assessor
    replied
    Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
    Egress windows are only required if there aren't otherwise adequate means of escape (e.g. because the room is an inner room, so the exit goes through a fire risk room). Egress windows are not possible in typical high rise buildings, but such buildings are still legal.

    Bathrooms don't have to have windows at all! If you look at section 2.9 in Approved Document B, you will find they are exempt, even if an inner room (otherwise no en suites).

    Bathrooms are generally considered extremely low fire risk rooms.

    Approved Document B, section 2.13, says basements may need egress windows, but only if they have habitable rooms; a bathroom is not a habitable room. Also a protected staircase can be used instead.

    Whilst it might well be that the complete design is unsafe, the lack of windows in the bathroom is not, in itself, sufficient to make it unsafe.

    In a modern flat, all the doors to the hallways will be fire doors (maybe not the bathroom, because it is very low risk, so you should be able to escape through the hallways and stairs.
    Answer complete, Dont look at any other answers other than this. Bathrooms and kitchen aren't habitable rooms, they don't need escape window.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moderator2
    replied
    Milly26 / Gyps, you have been warned about using forum aliases in this way before, it’s dishonest and so disrespectful to other forum members, and simply not acceptable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gyps
    replied
    leaseholder64,

    Thanks for your help...building control are now looking in to the situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Milly26
    replied
    leaseholder64,

    If there was a fire on the stairs there would be no way for a person to get in or out....the stairs are the only exit and the window is too small to exit...will ask a surveyor now

    Leave a comment:


  • MisterB
    replied
    Originally posted by Milly26 View Post

    Building regulations under part B require ceilings to be fire safe, windows to be a certain size to escape from and for a fire fighter to enter/exit and possibly a fire door so no it is NOT safe as I have no means of exit..its a fire trap
    a little knowledge .......

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholder64
    replied
    Egress windows are only required if there aren't otherwise adequate means of escape (e.g. because the room is an inner room, so the exit goes through a fire risk room). Egress windows are not possible in typical high rise buildings, but such buildings are still legal.

    Bathrooms don't have to have windows at all! If you look at section 2.9 in Approved Document B, you will find they are exempt, even if an inner room (otherwise no en suites).

    Bathrooms are generally considered extremely low fire risk rooms.

    Approved Document B, section 2.13, says basements may need egress windows, but only if they have habitable rooms; a bathroom is not a habitable room. Also a protected staircase can be used instead.

    Whilst it might well be that the complete design is unsafe, the lack of windows in the bathroom is not, in itself, sufficient to make it unsafe.

    In a modern flat, all the doors to the hallways will be fire doors (maybe not the bathroom, because it is very low risk, so you should be able to escape through the hallways and stairs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Milly26
    replied
    Gordon999,

    Moving takes, energy, time and money...so no not easy to move...

    Leave a comment:


  • Milly26
    replied
    paulamis,

    Building regulations require egress through a certain size window

    Leave a comment:


  • Milly26
    replied
    paulamis,

    Building regulations under part B require ceilings to be fire safe, windows to be a certain size to escape from and for a fire fighter to enter/exit and possibly a fire door so no it is NOT safe as I have no means of exit..its a fire trap

    Leave a comment:


  • Gordon999
    replied
    If you are living in constant anxiety and stress , it is better if you move to another flat with safer layout .

    Leave a comment:


  • MisterB
    replied
    hard wired interlinked smoke alarms might reduce your anxiety and allow you to poo in peace

    Leave a comment:


  • paulamis
    replied
    I have a bathroom with no window in my house...

    There may be other building reg probs with your basement bathroom, but I don't think you need emergency egress windows on a bathroom.

    Leave a comment:

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