Lease still has 4 months to run but landlord wants to sell

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  • Lease still has 4 months to run but landlord wants to sell

    I rent a house and my annual rental agreement still has 4 months to run. I have just taken a new job that enables me to walk to work from my rented property so I'm loth to move but now my landlady has decided she wants to sell the property and is making my life a little unpleasant

    What are my rights regarding occupancy till the contract expires? If I offer to move out early can I ask the LL to compensate me for the rent for the remaining months? What about the cost of finding a new place to live / removal fees / storage fees? What about my rights during visits or viewings by potential buyers?

  • #2
    1. Your tenancy is entirely unaffected. You can stay put, if you want, at least until the fixed term expires.
    2. You do not need to allow access for viewings unless you want to.
    3. If you feel like leaving early, you could surrender the tenancy in exchange for £££.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by theoriginalsid View Post
      What are my rights regarding occupancy till the contract expires?
      You are legally entitled to stay until the end of the contract. LL can either sell with you included in the sale or wait until you've left. Or negotiate an agreed early surrender of the contract.

      If I offer to move out early can I ask the LL to compensate me for the rent for the remaining months?
      You can bargain, if that's what you mean --- e.g. "I'll move out early if you pay me £X."

      What about the cost of finding a new place to live / removal fees / storage fees?
      You could offer to move out early if she pays these costs.

      What about my rights during visits or viewings by potential buyers?
      If you don't want any visits or viewings, they can't visit or view. It's your home and nobody can enter without your permission --- except in an emergency.

      EDIT: Jeffrey beat me to it!

      Peter

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pcwilkins View Post
        EDIT: Jeffrey beat me to it!

        Peter
        Violence will solve nothing, these beatings must stop!

        Comment


        • #5
          Having been in the same situation so many times that I'm almost fed-up of posting - having been a regular poster on this matter before : you have rights and you have no rights.

          Basically, doesn't matter how long your tenancy - they can sell with you in it. END OF.

          You can chose to make life difficult - and refuse them entry to a) let an EA value the property b) allow prospective buyers around the property - but in my experience this has been counter-productive if you are dealing with a decent landlord but then again, a decent landlord would probably do it nicely and let you know etc.

          Have to say LLs have us over a barrell on this count - if we are not nice - they refuse to give back our deposits - or make it difficult - if we are nice - they might give back our deposits but then again, may not!!

          Have to say if your LL is selling now - given all the hype around - and if they don't own a substantial amount of the property - etc, etc - then you're likely to be with a LL who is desperate to sell - you might (might) be able to negotiate a month's rental for inconvenience - but I've never managed it - and so many of the properties I've been in have been sold within a year!

          Moving costs - etc - you'll only get if they have a secure buyer within a month who insists on a completion date - in my experience - that has NEVER happened - and believe me I have so much experience on this.

          However, what I have had work in my favour - was saying I would stay on and move out nicely - until exchange of contracts (enabling them to get their rent till last possible moment - and me stay in home and lengthen out moving costs).

          Has meant on several occasions staying in over 9 months after property on market - but then again meant having to find somewhere at less than 4 weeks!! Not easy in some places.

          Have written to my local MP on this matter 5 times - never got a reply. Guess his son/daughter was in charge - so not surprised.

          Good luck.

          Comment


          • #6
            The new purchaser may be delighted to buy it with a T in situ. So you may not lose your home. You're going to lose in in 4 months anyway; if you play ball you may be in luck with the new owner.
            The contents of this note are neither advice nor a definitive answer. If you plan to rely on this, you should pay somebody for proper advice.

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