Condensation to window frames...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Condensation to window frames...

    Hi,

    could somebody advise on whether as a tenant I would be liable for mould and the repainting of the windows. It is a metal frame of a conversion factory and not much in the way of ventilation. I have been charged £400 pounds to rectify the windows - I was under the impression that mould was a living organism and would continue to return even after superficial painting.

    Any advice?

    Thanks

    #2
    Originally posted by MWKNOWLES View Post
    could somebody advise on whether as a tenant I would be liable for mould and the repainting of the windows.
    Depends whether it's your fault. When you say there isn't much ventilation, what does that mean? Do the windows open?

    I have been charged £400 pounds to rectify the windows - I was under the impression that mould was a living organism and would continue to return even after superficial painting.
    Superficial painting obviously won't help, but you can get rid of mould. It's a living organism so it can be killed.

    Peter

    Comment


      #3
      Condensation

      Well yes the windows open - but that's not much good when it is -1.

      these windows are 12 by 6 metal frames with many glass windows.....

      Yes mould can be killed but this was clearly a problem logged before i moved in and only appeared during a cold snap. My feeling is that it would be a large job for me to undertake especially when paying £23,000 per annum for a 1 bedroom appartment.

      regards

      Mark

      Comment


        #4
        So when you say that there is "not much in the way of ventilation", is this because it is too cold to open the windows?

        When you say you have been charged £400, who charged you and what exactly was the charge for?

        Peter

        Comment


          #5
          You may wish to check your tenancy agreement, I have it written in to all of mine that it is down to the tenant to make sure that the property is aired.

          As the LL doesn't live at the property, how could it be down to them?

          Comment


            #6
            The problem is this occurred in a 2 week slot. yes it would be cold to open the windows and I also was only at the flat 2-3 days a week due to business travel and girlfriends. I agree the LL is not present but this was not down to long term neglect - the rest of the flat is immaculate. The charge is for scraping the sills (with special tools?) and repainting the windows.

            Mark

            Comment


              #7
              To be honest we have most of our windows open, at least during the day, no matter what the temperature outside is, because we know that once you get mould it can be hard to get rid of it.

              Having said that, it is possible that it might be a problem with the property rather than you. Have you got neighbours? If so, ask them if they also have damp problems.

              Originally posted by Colincbayley View Post
              As the LL doesn't live at the property, how could it be down to them?
              Not sure if OP was suggesting it could be LL's "fault" --- but some properties are vulnerable to damp just because of how they're built. Someone I know of had all the windows open, was running a dehumidifier which was extracting huge amounts of water per day, and was still suffering from damp problems. In the end it turned out to a be a problem with the property which the LL had to get sorted.

              Peter

              Comment


                #8
                We've just been contacted by two of our tenants (in different houses) to complain about mould due to condensation problems that only appeared during the recent cold snap. We've only owned the houses since April and were not aware of any such problems over the Spring and Summer.

                Both rooms are occupied by girls who have been drying wet towels in the rooms and keeping the windows closed because of the cold.

                We have killed the mould by using a proprietory mould killer and cleaner and will repaint using a special mould inhibiting paint. BUT, the tenant must do their part and follow the instructions which are written in the AST. They must keep the windows open a little (both rooms have small top windows that can be used for ventilation) and not use the radiators to dry wet towels and clothes.

                We also intend to fit extractor fans with a humidifier element (they switch on automatically when the humidity gets to a pre-set level) which I hope will address the problem long term and without having to rely on the tenant opening the windows when it is cold which it is doubtful that they will do!

                Just for good measure we intend to paint the outside walls of the two rooms with Thompson's exterior seal (dries clear and can be used on any exterior wall material such as brick, concrete etc whilst still damp) to ensure that the condensation problem is not being added to by penatrating damp. (We have excluded rising damp, leaks etc)

                Condensation problems are a real pain.
                Last edited by bagpuss; 27-11-2007, 22:32 PM. Reason: added a paragraph

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by bagpuss View Post
                  They must [...] not use the radiators to dry wet towels and clothes.
                  Is there provision for them to dry clothes /towels by any other means, eg properly-vented tumble drier etc

                  Just for good measure we intend to paint the outside walls of the two rooms with Thompson's exterior seal (dries clear and can be used on any exterior wall material such as brick, concrete etc whilst still damp) to ensure that the condensation problem is not being added to by penatrating damp.
                  Beware that in some circumstances that stuff can be a bad thing, as it effectively seals the outer face and prevents the building 'breathing' - you can end up trapping moisture within the brickwork and severely damaging it

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                    Is there provision for them to dry clothes /towels by any other means, eg properly-vented tumble drier etc
                    Even if not ...direct them to nearest luanderette!

                    Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                    Beware that in some circumstances that stuff can be a bad thing, as it effectively seals the outer face and prevents the building 'breathing' - you can end up trapping moisture within the brickwork and severely damaging it
                    Also will have no effect on condensation ...thermal lined plaster board can help immensely if used in conjunction with sensible ventilation !
                    A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                    W.Churchill

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks for the feedback on our proposed solutions.

                      We take your point about the sealer possibly locking dampness in, although the sealer manufacturers say it does allow the brick to 'breathe'. The problem seems to be confined to one room which has 3 outside walls. I think the extractor fan which is contolled by humidity levels + anti mould treatment and decorating with anti mould paint seems to be the best bet in the first instance.

                      Re drying laundry in the rooms. The tenants do have other facilities within the house plus they can take items to the Uni laundry which has large driers and which is only 50 yds away from the property. Not drying laundry in the rooms is written into the AST too.

                      Comment

                      Latest Activity

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X