who pays for callout for faulty cooker

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    #16
    Originally posted by tatemono View Post
    Don't really see the logic behind the equation that a "good" landlord is one who picks up the costs his tenants are liable for.
    In general, you may need to pay for repair (to meet legal obligations, e.g.front door smashed in) and then attempt to recover from the tenant.
    Ultimately you may be unable to recover the money from the tenant (for one of several reasons) and so end up picking up the cost the tenant is liable for. But you are stil a good landlord because you have met your legal obligations.

    In this case, it appears that you arranged for a gas engineer to attend without ascertaining if the appliance belonged to you or the tenant. If it does belong to the tenant, then the tenant may argue that you should have got their permission to employ that person at that cost before going ahead. However, a counter argument is that the noise may have been form a problem with the gas supply (which you could not know before the engineer attended) and it is your duty to keep the supply safe.

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      #17
      Originally posted by tatemono View Post
      Just asking so I can learn as much as I can to be a better landlord. Don't really see the logic behind the equation that a "good" landlord is one who picks up the costs his tenants are liable for. In this case the amount is, as you say, negligible. But if it wasn't....
      My American boss would describe the learning part of an experience as the "take".

      The "take" here is that the tenancy agreement should clearly outline who's responsible for what.
      There are a number of things that the law requires the landlord to maintain (which you can't contract out of), but clarity is always helpful.

      There are always going to be grey areas - you are responsible for the gas safety, to the point on the wall where the cooker "takes over" and, if neither of you know where the problem is coming from, a call out is inevitable to find out.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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        #18
        I think we often get it the wrong way.

        Unless it is clear that the issue is the landlord's responsibility it is for the tenant to call for someone, and pay for it, if he wants something repaired. If it then turns out that the issue was the landlord's responsibility then he should present the bill to the landlord.

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          #19
          On a practical level, I'd want the tenant to talk to me (or my agent) first - assuming the place wasn't ablaze.
          I can get stuff done much more cheaply than a tenant with Google, with people I trust.

          At the end of the day, the tenant is only interested in the quality of work for now, while I care about it long into the future.
          I'd rather the tradesman was working for me and asked me what should be done.
          I'm sure I pick up the odd invoice I might not have otherwise.
          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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            #20
            The tenant initiated and the letting agent got someone round before notifying me (overseas) because he thought it might be a gas leak. It wasn't but I was grateful that everyone acted fast to make sure it wasn't.

            Yes I'd have a clear understanding of every item in the place if it was mine but when you inherit a property you inherit the history and not everyone remembers whose was what. It doesn't help that there's no inventory and very spotty paperwork either.

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