Compensation for lack of communal area lighting

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    Compensation for lack of communal area lighting

    Our tenant is asking for us to remedy or compensate her for two lights being out in the communal area corridor next to her flat.

    We pay a property management company to deal with the communal area lights but their response for the last month has been that 'electricians are appointed to deal with the lighting issue'. I have chased this up twice but with no success.

    What do I do?

    Do I compensate? If so, how much is reasonable for what is effectively a light bulb in a communal area, not the actual flat itself?

    #2
    No compensation is due

    Buy them a couple of £5 motion lights

    If they make more than one such request in anything other than an informing manner ("I want compensation") I would terminate their tenancy when possible - you are asking for trouble.

    Comment


      #3
      I would not be compensating.

      Is the area particularly dark - ie an underground car park?

      Comment


        #4
        [QUOTE=mattpenn;638077]Our tenant is asking for us to remedy or compensate her for two lights being out in the communal area corridor next to her flat.

        We pay a property management company to deal with the communal area lights but their response for the last month has been that 'electricians are appointed to deal with the lighting issue'. I have chased this up twice but with no success.

        What do I do?QUOTE]

        How much difference does it make to the tenant - can she still see the lock on her front door, can she still see the way to the stairs or the lift, or to take out her rubbish with the two lights missing?

        If no to any of these, push agents to push the electricians, stressing health and safety issue. Do this in writing so you have a record. I understand you'd be liable to the tenant if there were to be an accident, and although you could sue the freeholder's management company it's best to avoid an accident if poss.

        Comment


          #5
          The tenant probably doesn't actually want compensation, but more likely doesn't have any other way of pressurising the landlord into actually getting it fixed.
          I don't think two calls in a month is exactly bending over backwards to sort it out, if someone gets hurt then it could get messy.

          Comment


            #6
            I agree that two calls a month is woefully inadequate.

            Electricians are plentiful. Call and write to the Managing Agent giving them a deadline in which to ressolve the matter. I can't believe that the repair of two lights is going to exceed the £250 'S20' barrier so the delay in, at the very least, investigating what the fault is, is inexcusable.

            Give them 14-days to either inspect and provide details of the required repairs or to actually repair. If they fail to do so then you'll employ someone directly and send them the bill for settlement. NOTE: the communal lighting falls under 'commercial' liabilities so the electrical work needs to be certified by a commercial qualified electrician - not just domestic - and you'll need to provide copies of the certs.
            There is always scope for misinterpretation.

            If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

            Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by mk1fan View Post
              Give them 14-days to either inspect and provide details of the required repairs or to actually repair. If they fail to do so then you'll employ someone directly and send them the bill for settlement. NOTE: the communal lighting falls under 'commercial' liabilities so the electrical work needs to be certified by a commercial qualified electrician - not just domestic - and you'll need to provide copies of the certs.
              Nice in theory, but in practice not so much. The lessee has no right whatever to carry out these works. The lessee may not have the key to the electrical boxes. The lessee is unlikely to get his money refunded, and there is no obligation on the freeholder to refund. The lessee will be responsible for any damage caused. And if the freeholder does not pay up, then the FTT has no remit to assess such a matter (of works carried out by a lessee).

              So no. The freeholder needs to be held to account via the normal routes (insofar as those routes are feasible - which they often are not).

              Do you really think I can say - Freeholder has failed to repair the ho0ldes in the roof - I am just going to do the work and bill him after waiting 2 weeks?

              Comment


                #8
                It hasn't been two-weeks though has it? It has been over a month already and nothing has been done.

                As I said, the cost of repair is unlikely to breach the £250 threshold so there is no excuse for not undertaking investigations and repairs within that time. Blatant incompetence and (if they were a Professional) negligent. Unless there is zero money in the client account - which should have been reported to the lessees instantly - then a month is a very generous 'reasonable' timescale.

                I wouldn't like a court case where I'd have to explain why I had failled to undertake a simple and minor repair within 44+ days of being informed even if I did win. It would be an embarrasment to have such a thing as a matter of public record. Then again such views / attitudes don't tend to be held by 'Managing Agents'.
                There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                Comment

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