No bond protection

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    No bond protection

    I have recently moved out of my house to move in with my partner. so decided to let my house out. I had only lived there for 20 months and expected to be there a lot longer so i renovated it to a very high standard. When I decided to let it out I was paranoid about all the work i had done being ruined so as my friend was looking for a place I decided to let him have it at a discounted rate (stupidly thinking this was a good idea as i thought it was a guarantee he would look after the place) after 2 months and a week of living there he has sent me a photo of the oak worktop which is warped beyond repair and now has a large crack through it from water damage. his argument is that he has used it as it should be used but I never had a problem once in all the time I lived there.

    Thanks for reading and i would really appreciate anybody advice as to where I stand and what I can do about it.

    15934009_10211945826105986_1558349700_o.jpg
    15934152_10211945825905981_1347837390_o.jpg

    #2
    Granite seems to be fairly tenant proof. (Frankly I wouldn't supply oak for a tenant, as it is bound to be abused.)

    I guess your friend may be getting a S21 notice after the 4 month point?

    Comment


      #3
      It looks like he's put a very hot tray on a very wet top. I'd write it off as a learning experience and replace it with the cheapest worktop for tenants as they just don't seem to care.

      I have a piece of solid wood worktop, bamboo I think, (a skip rescue item ) and it's taken a load of abuse off me - hot items placed on it etc and it's stood up really well so that might be another option but it's expensive.

      Comment


        #4
        To be fair had it been sealed and fitted correctly?. That doesn't look like damage caused on purpose and surely it should take a flood to split the wood like that?

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          #5
          Wright76,

          yes i fitted and sealed it myself, I'm a carpenter by trade (5 coats of tung oil a year ago and another 3 coats when the tenant moved in in October - didn't really need it but did it as a precaution) thats why I cant work out how this has happened I can only put it down to poor treatment of the worktop. My other issue is why has it only been brought to my attention now its beyond repair? It hasn't got in that state over night.

          Do I have to pay for repairs? or can I make my tenant pay?

          Comment


            #6
            It's cracked along the join line. I'd say it got wet, absorbed the water, then when the T put the hot tray on it the water boiled up and split the join. I'd guess you were just unlucky with the wood.

            It's very annoying when tenants leave things until they are beyond repair, but if it's any consolation, your tenant does not have a monopoly on this trait.

            You don't have to pay for the repairs but if you don't the problem will get even worse. You could possibly get your tenant to pay either voluntarily, through the courts or deduct it from his deposit.

            Did you get a check in inventory done?

            Comment


              #7
              You can't do much right now.
              It's the tenant's home not yours (which is hard to get your head round - but it's not your home anymore).

              The tenant has to return the property in the condition they received it less fair wear and tear.
              But that's in the future.

              On the other hand, the tenant says they haven't done anything weird and that looks seriously damaged.
              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

              Comment


                #8
                jpkeates,

                So I'm not wrong in thinking that's more that fair wear and tear? I always get paranoid I'm being too harsh but I don't believe I should have to pay for that damage. so at the end of his tenancy he can either rectify it or I can take it out of his bond?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Is his deposit held or insured in a scheme?

                  You can't automatically take it but can apply and the the deposit scheme will advise.

                  If it's not held in a scheme then I wouldn't pursue it as he can pursue you for a penalty which will likely cost more than the bench

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Increase the rent to market value.
                    Any advice I give is my opinion and experience, I am as you also learning.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by liamaaa View Post
                      So I'm not wrong in thinking that's more that fair wear and tear?
                      Far beyond fair wear and tear.

                      Fair wear and tear in this instance would maybe be the odd mark from someone not using a chopping board, or a ring mark from a pan being put down.. That looks to have got far wetter than is normal, and something hot put on it.
                      Were instructions given/provided on caring for a wooden worktop?

                      Too late now, damage is done.. Make sure they are aware of their obligation to return the place in same condition minus fair wear and tear..
                      Or if the friendship is more important, replace worktop with something far more forgiving (corian/engineered stone or maybe just a nice looking basic laminate) and write it off as a learning experience (never rent to friends)

                      Sam

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                        #12
                        I've drafted a letter giving him 2 options, 1- leave it but when his tenancy is up he has to return the property in the original state or it comes out of his deposit. 2- ill replace it myself but his rent goes up to market value. I think both are fair options. and believe me I will not be renting to friends in the future. I have another property that I have been letting out for over 8 years and my friend is the first person to give me a problem like this

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Looking at it again, what others were labelling as 'scorch marks' from something hot being put down I dont believe is.. It looks more like the wood is starting to rot hence turning black. Tenant was using the draining board area as a draining board, it got wet (for some time) and didnt get a chance to dry out.. Hence their comment about using the kitchen as a kitchen is intended to be used. Benefit of the doubt here but it may not be their fault.

                          As another solution, how extensive in distance/area is the damage? Would removing the butlers sink and fitting a wider more standard sink (maybe full size bowl+1/2 bowl+decent size draining board) cover the removal of the damaged area? Might be a cheaper/simpler option, and gives you a butlers sink to sell/reuse to recover some of the cost.
                          Then figure out how to seal the worktop such that tenant doesnt have to worry about splashes of water... Varnish maybe? Wont look quite as nice as a well oiled wooden worktop but for this purpose giving it a longer life with minimal maintenance is probably more important.

                          Either way they need to be on market rent.. as a landlord our view (initially) of renting to friends is that they will take better care of the place.. and having spoken to some friends who were interested in being tenants their view was that I would cut them more slack than normal landlords... Different sides of the coin.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            As others have suggested - don't let to friends and don't let properties you're still emotionally attached to.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              No bond protection

                              Back in October, me and my girlfriend decided to move into her house and rent mine out for some extra money. At the same time my friend and his partner were looking for a place to rent while they look for somewhere to buy. I thought it would be perfect to rent to him as I would be guaranteed he would look after the house I've worked so hard on.

                              In January he notified me that there was some damage to the oak worktops in the kitchen. It was completely warped and had a big crack down the middle which I deemed as excessive damage not your general wear and tear. I sent him an email giving him 2 options, 1- I will fix it but will increase his rent to market value (£125 more than what he is paying) or 2- he fixes it himself before the end of his tenancy. he opted for number 2.

                              Now he has handed in his notice that he would like to move out at the end of the month I went round for a final inspection and the worktop hasn't been replaced, So I got some quotes and issued him with a bill. Now he is trying to say it wasn't his fault that the worktop was damaged and doesn't want to pay for it. the only issue is that when they moved in, as he was my friend and it was only a 6 month agreement I never had a tenancy agreement drawn up and I didn't protect the security bond. I know Ive made a lot of mistakes and done things in the wrong way but I just want advice on what to do now and where I stand on making him pay for the damage he has caused.

                              Thanks for reading and I appreciate anyone's input

                              Liam

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