Responsibility when Tenant is just plain thick (heating issue)

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    #16
    Originally posted by GrumpyGit View Post
    [LIST]
    . The 'balancing' valve is normally under a brass cap that's impossible to access without a spanner. Are you sure your tenant adjusted the 'balance' valve? This would take a lot of determination on his part? Are you sure it wasn't just the manual valve that he adjusted? A lot of manual valves lose their plastic cap and leave a little square shaft that must be turned with a pair of mole grips.
    The balance valve is normally under a plastic cap and is very accessible. Just a small adjustable spanner is needed to turn it!

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      #17
      Originally posted by GrumpyGit View Post
      The thermostat in the hallway of traditional central heating systems simply controls when the boiler switches on and off.
      That's not really true. The programmer determines whether the boiler is operating, or not. The room thermostat 'calls for heat' when the ambient temperature falls below the temperature set on the themostat (and it does that 24x7), and if the programmer is set to allow the boiler to fire up, it does so, heating the water in the heating circuit for as long as the room thermostat calls for heat, or until the temperature of the water in the circuit reaches the temperature of the boiler's own thermostat.

      If the water in the heating circuit ever gets anywhere near boiling point, there is a serious and dangerous fault in the boiler.

      A modern combi-boiler, for example, has a heat output sufficient to run a hot bath with cold water from the rising main in January - which is probably 4-6 times the heat output of every radiator in the house combined. If the boiler came on at 6am to heat a cold house, it could boil the water in the heating circuit in about five minutes from cold if the room thermostat could just continue to 'call for heat' because the hall was chilly.

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        #18
        Originally posted by JK0 View Post
        Even if there is one 'exception' radiator, this could still happen with a conventional heating system. (The exception rad will not dissipate enough heat to stop the water in the heating circuit boiling, if the boiler and wall thermostats are set high enough.)
        I believe that in this case there was no return path for the heating circuit so the only route for the heated water to go was into the header tank, while on the cold side of the system water would have been taken from the header tank. the differential in those rates caused the header tank to fill and overflow, the hot water was a secondary and exasperating problem. If a return path was provided then there should not be an overheating issue, certainly not 'boiling' as the heating system should not reach that temperature.

        Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
        Yes, I agree this must have been badly wired plumbing.
        It's not necessarily bad plumbing, but if you take my house as an example where all but one radiator has a thermo-valve, I would suggest that the likelihood of the occupant turning off all radiators plus the one which has no TRV (which would require a tool to turn off) is lower.

        The odd thing about this situation is that if this person wanted all radiators to be off at the same time, then the simplest solution is to turn off the heating system?
        I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

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          #19
          The return path would presumably be via the hot water tank, wouldn't it?

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            #20
            None of us know the actual system, age or plumbing layout, prob. just referring to our own c/h system?

            LL should engage plumber to fit TRVs, if applicable to layout.

            T prob closed all valves to save heating energy costs (misguided IMO).
            TRVs can adjust temp for each rad. In Summer, I just reduce main controlling thermostat to 10 C, so boiler does not 'kick in' until temp falls below 10 C.
            With modern wireless thermostats most LLs & Ts prob cannot understand them, nothing to do with IQ.

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              #21
              Originally posted by mariner View Post
              LL should engage plumber to fit TRVs, if applicable to layout.
              If a new boiler is fitted, Building Regulations require that the controls for the whole system are brought up to current standards, anyway, but fitting TRVs could not have prevented this issue, because they will still close off circulation if the room temperature is above the temperature set. If every value to every radiator is shut (or can be shut), and there is no other route for the water circulated by the pump to take, something regrettable is going to happen. Perhaps LLs should do a 'risk assessment' of their properties to consider what provision there is, system by system, for this eventuality.

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                #22
                Originally posted by JK0 View Post
                The return path would presumably be via the hot water tank, wouldn't it?
                The hot water tank may have a central heating coil inside where the central heating water is directed by a two way valve for heating / hot water, but if that valve is in the heating only position the central heating water will end up in the central heating header tank.
                I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

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