Landlord visits

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    Landlord visits

    I share a rented flat with two other people, the landlord is the parent of one of the other tenants and he visits once or twice a week sometimes letting himself in when his daughter isn't there. Should he be giving us 24 hours notice of visits like a normal landlord or is it sufficient for his daughter to invite him over, even if she isn't there? It makes me uncomfortable as I don't always know when he is coming and he has occasionally let himself in when I have been there on my own. It is a 12 month AST would this be sufficient reason to end the tenancy if he doesn't agree to stop. I have emailed with my concerns earlier in the tenancy as sometimes he was there until the early hours of the morning and was noisy so I couldn't sleep. He isn't there in the night anymore but seems to think it is ok to pop in during the day. Can I tell him not to come round even though he is my flatmates Dad?

    #2
    Are these individual tenancy (Mr A Tenant, room 3...) or one single signed by all joint tenancy?
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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      #3
      Individual tenancies.

      Comment


        #4
        Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe with three tenants unrelated to each other the property will be an HMO. The landlord is the HMO Manager and has the right to let himself into the common areas at any time.

        E.g.: http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums...222#post228222

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          #5
          You can tell him not to come into your room. His access to common areas is OK as long as it is reasonable (twice a week for a small HMO is fair IMHO).

          Tink you need to decide if you want to stay or find a new home.

          Does he have a mortgage on the place? If so probably breaking mortgage conditions. £5 says he's up to some fiddle (post Xmas cynicism..)
          I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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            #6
            It is a self contained, three bedroom flat with shared kitchen, sitting room and bathroom. We are all students, two sisters and me, their parents own the flat. I have an individual tenancy agreement but I don't know what the situation of the others is. I have tried to change some details just in case they frequent these forums but as a young woman it is a bit weird to find your landlord in the house without any notice. Do you think he can do this because the flat is legally an hmo? It doesn't mention this in the tenancy agreement anywhere

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              #7
              I would leave but it is a 12 month AST and it doesn't end until summer and I can't afford to lose the rent. Will I just have to put up with it or can I insist on knowing when he will visit - just to give you context I have been in the flat on my own, come out of the shower in a towel to find him sat there. I don't feel like I can relax despite paying a lot of rent

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                #8
                People are entitled to wear different hats.

                Presuming this is a joint tenancy and ignoring the HMO issue, the tenant did not invite the landlord, then the landlord cannot do this.

                A tenant can however invite her father over, and can do this without the consent of other inhabitants, and this has nothing at all to do with the landlord. It is rude and inappropriate, but if it were not for the landlord aspect you would be asking a different question. "My flatmate has allowed her boyfriend to live with us".

                I suggest that what is happening is the latter.

                Basically the joint tenant has invited a guest over -- who happens to be the landlord.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Kevin Smith View Post
                  I would leave but it is a 12 month AST and it doesn't end until summer and I can't afford to lose the rent. Will I just have to put up with it or can I insist on knowing when he will visit - just to give you context I have been in the flat on my own, come out of the shower in a towel to find him sat there. I don't feel like I can relax despite paying a lot of rent
                  Ah, if the other two are sisters then I guess it's not an HMO as they form one household...

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                    #10
                    What about letting himself in when she isn't there, is that ok as he is her father as well as the landlord?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Kevin Smith View Post
                      What about letting himself in when she isn't there, is that ok as he is her father as well as the landlord?
                      Well the tenant has given permission for a guest to enter. Not much you can do about it (or what you can do is the same as if your joint-tenancy flatmate gave a key and permission of random entry to her boyfriend).

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                        #12
                        I think if I was considering a situation where I would be living with two siblings in a flat owned by their parents who lived nearby, I would ask myself "Do I really adore this family and kind of wish I was part of it?" or "Do I just want a normal flatshare setup?"

                        If the latter then I wouldn't live there / I'd move out.

                        Because it certainly won't change.

                        And, yes, with the power dynamic being so stacked in their favour, the ever-present boyfriend/s are round the corner, too.

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                          #13
                          Good advice Vincent! I think I will just ask them if they could let me know when they intend to turn up and if they could stop letting themselves in when their daughters are out. They may agree, but lesson learned anyway....

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                            #14
                            As it is individual tenancies you can't refuse access to the common areas (kitchen, bathroom, sitting room, corridors, stairs) for the landlord: End of.

                            I would enquire, calmly & politely, if he would agree to an early surrender. Before you do this speak to your uni accomodation office (or similar name) they may "know" him or have other suggestions (including how easy it is to find another place & if there are others looking for a room).

                            Good luck.
                            I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Does the AST state the whole property is rented to 3 tenants who are 'jointly & severally liable' for property or you each have AST for 'room only' + common areas?
                              LL ability to enter has nothing to do with any HMO, he cannot enter a joint Tenancy without min 24hr Notice, in writing, of intended inspection even if the parent of 1 tenant.

                              In my student days (pre Internet), flatmates resolved issues between themselves at an agreed meeting for all.

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