New kitchen to replace a drawer knob?

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    New kitchen to replace a drawer knob?

    Hi all,

    So last week we had our house inspection. It was noted by the letting agent that one of the drawer knobs is not present in the kitchen (fixed unmoveable drawer under the sink). After reporting to the landlord, the landlord has said that if we can't find it he will have to pay for a new kitchen and it will come out of our deposit.

    So we remember it falling off within a week of living there, we put it somewhere to keep it safe and now we can't find it . It's a relatively new build (90's) and we've keep it almost immaculate throughout.

    Surely we can't be threatened to pay for a whole kitchen!?

    This wasn't noted on the previous inspections interestingly.

    James and Nina

    #2
    You can be threatened -- but you'd be daft to pay.

    Are you planning on leaving or has landlord given notice?? If not, do nothing or, if you have to, thank the landlord kindly for his suggestion.

    As & when you leave then if landlord doesn't agree to a sensible deduction from deposit (say £5 max..) then simple raise a dispute with the deposit scheme. See
    https://england.shelter.org.uk/housi...y_deposit_back
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

    Comment


      #3
      The landlord is quite clearly being ridiculous. Best case scenario is you find the missing knob. Next best case scenario is that you find a replacement which is the same or very close to the missing one. Worst case scenario is that you buy a new set of replacement knobs for all the cupboards and drawers.

      I'm assuming the deposit is properly protected? The scheme administrators would fall about laughing if this claim was presented. No question that you would win it.

      I would do a "yeah, yeah, whatever" and just ignore the threat.

      Comment


        #4
        They are having a giraffe!! Surely!!!

        Are you sure this is what the LL is saying or is it the agent just talking Sh*t!
        Any advice I give is my opinion and experience, I am as you also learning.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jungleuk View Post
          Hi all,

          So last week we had our house inspection. It was noted by the letting agent that one of the drawer knobs is not present in the kitchen (fixed unmoveable drawer under the sink). After reporting to the landlord, the landlord has said that if we can't find it he will have to pay for a new kitchen and it will come out of our deposit.

          So we remember it falling off within a week of living there, we put it somewhere to keep it safe and now we can't find it . It's a relatively new build (90's) and we've keep it almost immaculate throughout.

          Surely we can't be threatened to pay for a whole kitchen!?

          This wasn't noted on the previous inspections interestingly.

          James and Nina


          They can threaten all they want, but you wont be paying for a new kitchen.

          Ask landlord where kitchen is from/details and see if there is something the same/close available, if not then take some photos of your knob (lol!!) with a ruler for scale and find a close match, buy and fit. If they dont like it then they can try and claim it back but if it goes to dispute with deposit scheme they will lose.
          Or as per theartfullodger do nothing and dont stress, max deduction with be the cost of a knob.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jungleuk View Post
            Surely we can't be threatened to pay for a whole kitchen!?
            Your landlord is an imbecile.

            When you leave the property the landlord is entitled to claim for two things.
            Anything specifically agreed in the tenancy agreement (which sometimes include a need for a carpet clean or something specific like that) and compensation for any loss in value of their property beyond fair wear and tear that occurred during the lease.

            The loss of a cosmetic, non-functional item as described would probably be less than a pound.
            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
              The loss of a cosmetic, non-functional item as described would probably be less than a pound.
              £1 is a little too low. The tenants admit having had a knob which belonged to L. They lost it.

              Having replaced some knobs recently, I can confirm that some knobs can cost around £20 each. I would suggest that loss of an item requires replacement of that item.

              If a reasonably matching item cannot be sourced, it may well be reasonable (depending on the standard of the property) for all knobs to be replaced (tenant can retain existing knobs). In the alterative, the cost of a new mismatching knob (£20) plus some compensation for loss of value due to the mismatch (depends on the type of property).

              That fact that "This wasn't noted on the previous inspections interestingly" is probably not relevant. T is not being charged for a broken knob but a lost knob. Inventories do not usually list every item that is present when it is obvious that such items will be present unless specifically noted as a defect (door with door handle on inside, door handle on outside, window handle present, bathroom tap present, toilet seat present).

              Comment


                #8
                While I accept my figure may have been a tad low (I haven't had much to do with knobs recently - it's my age)...

                The compensation would have to take into account the useful life of the knob to date, which wasn't a loss attributable to the tenant.
                And, while I have some personal sympathy about the desirability of matching fittings, getting a replacement of all of the knobs for cosmetic reasons past the dispute process is unlikely.

                How they would handle a non-functional knob makes it much harder.

                /giggles uncontrollably.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Sorry in advance..... flippant response.....

                  "non-functional knob" sounds like my current tenants!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                    The compensation would have to take into account the useful life of the knob to date, which wasn't a loss attributable to the tenant.
                    Actually I disagree with this little part JP.
                    There are certain things that are amenable to "useful life" adjustment, and others that are not. I think this is in the latter category. The test is whether L is better off if the item is replaced with new.

                    a) T urinates on a mattress. Mattress was 5 years old. L buys a new mattress. L is better off than before T urinated.

                    b) T loses a knob. L gets new knob. L is no better off with new knob than with his lost knob.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Buy a replacement [matching] knob. Then remove one of the existing knobs from another drawer/door and fix this in place of the missing knob. Fit new knob the missing spot. Agent will look for the missing one and note it is now present. Can't argue it is different as it is original. They are unlikely to notice where the new one has been fitted as long as the match is pretty good.
                      There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                      If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                      Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Whatever solution you choose, tread sensitively as it sounds like the landlord was particularly attached to this knob.
                        Assume I know nothing.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
                          You can be threatened -- but you'd be daft to pay.

                          Are you planning on leaving or has landlord given notice?? If not, do nothing or, if you have to, thank the landlord kindly for his suggestion.

                          As & when you leave then if landlord doesn't agree to a sensible deduction from deposit (say £5 max..) then simple raise a dispute with the deposit scheme. See
                          https://england.shelter.org.uk/housi...y_deposit_back
                          We intend on leaving soon, as we're about to buy a house. Activating a break-clause, no doubt he'll have something to say about that too, based on this experience!

                          But thankfully it is in DPS

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Johnta7 View Post
                            The landlord is quite clearly being ridiculous. Best case scenario is you find the missing knob. Next best case scenario is that you find a replacement which is the same or very close to the missing one. Worst case scenario is that you buy a new set of replacement knobs for all the cupboards and drawers.

                            I'm assuming the deposit is properly protected? The scheme administrators would fall about laughing if this claim was presented. No question that you would win it.

                            I would do a "yeah, yeah, whatever" and just ignore the threat.
                            Three obvious scenarios there, which I would have hoped that the letting agent would have mentioned to the LL before forwarding on his response to me! It is a cheap MDF kitchen and plain white knobs - not hard to replace.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The letting agent works for the landlord, and if the landlord told them to tell you something, they may not have had much choice.
                              However stupid.
                              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                              Comment

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