Who is responsible for removing building materials?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Who is responsible for removing building materials?

    Hi all first time poster and would appreciate some guidance regarding who is responsible for removing building materials.

    We are currently renting a property in Wales that is having some work done to it, mostly a damp proof course. I suspect that the builder is a bit of a cowboy as he decorated the property before we moved in and it was very sub standard i.e grouting left on all kitchen tiles, incorrectly fitted bath panel held in place by a screw in the bathroom floor and a host of other problems.

    The walls have been stripped in preparation for the damp proof course but all the old plaster and some concrete flooring has been bagged up (approx 15 large bags), old gas radiator and some concrete dumped in the front garden. We have not been asked to remove these materials but the landlords are very reluctant to spend any money on the property unless they have to so I am of the assumption that they expect us to remove it. I suffer with sciatica so am reluctant to lift the heavy bags unless I have to.
    I just wanted to know who's responsible for the removal of these materials? Would it be myself, the builder or the landlord?

    Thanks in advance

    #2
    Out of the 3 options it's definitely not the tenant.
    "I'm afraid I didn't do enough background checks apart from checking her identity on Facebook" - ANON

    What I say is based on my own experience and research - Please don't take as gospel without first checking the gospel yourself.

    Comment


      #3
      Thats good to know. Thank you for the response.

      We have a particularly sour relationship with the landlord at this moment in time due to complaining about a number of things that are wrong with the property. We found a live indoor electrical plug socket an outside wall in the garden where there used to be a lean to. Before the tenancy began we were told that the plug socket was disconnected and we had no reason to think otherwise. We had several builders inspect the property over the summer, one of which pointed out the plug socket and tested it as he did not feel comfortable leaving a family with small children in the garden without testing it. To our horror it was still live and we had been living with a fire hazard and death trap in the garden for over 13 months.

      We had at this point renewed our contract for 6 months so are stuck for the time being. the landlords took no responsibility and even uttered the words "if one of your kids had died we wouldnt be F@~cking liable".

      Anyway rant over, thank you for the response and I'm sure I will be back for some more advice at some point over the next few weeks.

      Comment


        #4
        Write (yes, WRITE! - keep copy) to landlord regarding stuff left & any other issues. There is a draft letter on Shelter website.

        If matters not resolved contact council environmental health ..


        However, this landlord sounds like someone you, me or anyone else shouldn;t rent from so in your shoes I'd be looking to move
        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you again for the advice. We are looking to move but are in a bit if a situation. We signed a 6 month contract before we found out about the damp issues and the electric in the garden so have to see the contract out. We are now aware the deposit isn't protected and these are just the beginning of the issues. everything seems to have reared its head at the wrong time...after we signed the extension on the contract. As we are saving to by our home and hope to be in a position to buy in the next few years we don't want to be in a position where we end up having a CCJ and not being able to get a mortgage because we have left the tenancy early.

          Thank you for the advice, I have already seen quite a few things of interest on the Shelter website. thank you for pointing it out.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by NewportTenant View Post
            Thank you again for the advice. We are looking to move but are in a bit if a situation. We signed a 6 month contract before we found out about the damp issues and the electric in the garden so have to see the contract out. We are now aware the deposit isn't protected and these are just the beginning of the issues. everything seems to have reared its head at the wrong time...after we signed the extension on the contract. As we are saving to by our home and hope to be in a position to buy in the next few years we don't want to be in a position where we end up having a CCJ and not being able to get a mortgage because we have left the tenancy early.

            Thank you for the advice, I have already seen quite a few things of interest on the Shelter website. thank you for pointing it out.
            Keep the lack of deposit protection card to yourself until the end of the tenancy. It puts you in a very strong position when you need to play it.
            "I'm afraid I didn't do enough background checks apart from checking her identity on Facebook" - ANON

            What I say is based on my own experience and research - Please don't take as gospel without first checking the gospel yourself.

            Comment


              #7
              I would place a 50p bet on the landlord not shifting the stuff (even if it's their responsibility, which it is).

              Have a look at the shelter protocol for getting a repair done and deducting the cost from the rent.
              You'll need to get a couple of quotes from a man with a van, send them to the landlord and offer to pay for the work to be done and deduct it from the rent.
              But at least the stuff will go and you won't have to haul it about.
              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

              Comment


                #8
                I would confidently put far more than 50p on it. Thanks for the advice

                Comment


                  #9
                  From a practical point of view - I would put all your effort in to finding somewhere to move to so that you can walk out the door before your current AST expires. Take lots of photos of the house when you have cleared your stuff out so that you can support your claim of how you left the property. I would take photos now as well so that you can demonstrate on going issues.

                  From what you have said, the LL sounds happy to keep their assests in poor condition.

                  You don't have to provide any notice that you will be leaving before expiry of the AST. It would be polite to, but nothing more.
                  There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                  If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                  Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Buildings that are to be demolished must be assessed a process known as dangerous waste designation to determine if they contain or are themselves a dangerous waste. Older buildings are often painted with lead paint and paints containing mercury-based biocides, use leaded pipes, have asbestos insulation, use mercury-containing fluorescent lamps and PCB ballasts and contain many other hazardous materials.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Well thank you Rupert, for pointlessly reviving a 3 month old thread.
                      To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        If your really desperate to get out then I would play the deposit penalty card NOW to negotiate an early release and deed of surrender.

                        Advise the landlord that you are aware you can claim up to x3 penalty for each tenancy you signed and would therefore ask that you will forfeit your right to take action if a deed of surrender is signed and accepted

                        Comment


                          #13
                          As the customer (LL/T) I would expect my Contractor to repair, make good, remove waste within cost estimate provided.
                          Who demolished garden lean-to, LL or previous T?
                          Was LL aware/notified?

                          Comment

                          Latest Activity

                          Collapse

                          Working...
                          X