Tenant responsibility for houseplants?

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    Tenant responsibility for houseplants?

    Personally, as a landlord, I think it would be nuts to leave posh houseplants in a tenanted property, but that's what my daughter's landlord did. (A so-called "accidental" landlord who left her personal stuff behind in the flat on moving out.)

    Two years into the tenancy, the landlord is asking for the several plants back. Leaving aside the argument that she shouldn't be doing that before the end of the tenancy anyway, what would the panel say are my daughter's responsibility for the plants, which needless to say are all long-since dead? No doubt they have been under- or over-watered. It's not clear at the moment whether they were listed on the inventory, by the way.

    At the very least I would be advising her not to pay anything until the end of the tenancy (but in fact, she's moving anyway within the next 6 months), but should she be expected to be responsible anyway?

    They were large plants, so I fully expect the landlord to be unhappy and demanding reparations...

    #2
    What does the tenancy agreement say about the plants?
    Was anything said verbally about the care of the plants?
    Are the (dead) plants still in situ?
    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

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      #3
      Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
      should she be expected to be responsible anyway?
      I would class it as "fair wear and tear". Most houseplants don't last forever.

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        #4
        It's unrealistic to expect a tenant to be responsible for keeping something alive.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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          #5
          Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
          It's unrealistic to expect a tenant to be responsible for keeping something alive.
          Exactly. Was your daughter supposed not to go on holiday etc.

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            #6
            Utterly unreasonable and laughable request. The landlord has a tenancy agreement, not a contract of employment for a gardener.
            Give them back the plant pots and a packet of seeds. Say it with flowers, give them a triffid !!
            I may be a housing professional but my views, thoughts, opinions, advice, criticisms or otherwise on this board are mine and are not representative of my company, colleagues, managers. I am here as an independent human being who simply wants to learn new stuff, share ideas and interact with like minded people.

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              #7
              Assuming there is nothing in the tenancy agreement about the plants, nor in the inventory ( but agents may have included everything in the house ) Give landlord an invoice for looking after their personal property for 2 years.

              But, plants and trees in the garden are also the personal property of the landlord, are they not ?

              But I would just say, they expired, and are not available.

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                #8
                Take the pots out in the garden, and pot up a few weeds, and give them back to the landlord.
                To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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                  #9
                  Agree with everyone else. Unless the tenancy contract specifically makes T liable for caring for houseplants (which can actually last years, if properly tended), then LL doesn't have a leg to stand on if T lets them die.

                  If they were that important to the LL she should have taken them with her.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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