Who's responsible for changing flooring?

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  • thesaint
    replied
    Originally posted by carolines100 View Post
    When does it become a problem? 1 year old, 2, 5 etc?
    It's 2 years 3 months and 11 days.
    The legislation(or lack of) makes my own timelines moot though.

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  • carolines100
    replied
    Originally posted by thesaint View Post
    There's a myriad of things I am not happy about as a landlord.
    I can't say a tenant replacing 7 year old carpet and lino at their own expense ranks in the top 10.
    When does it become a problem? 1 year old, 2, 5 etc?

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  • thesaint
    replied
    Originally posted by carolines100 View Post
    so if it's the T's responsibility, does that mean you have no problem with the T changing the floor covering? Ie replacing the carpet, lino etc?
    Originally posted by carolines100 View Post
    No to the people earlier in the post who were saying it is the Ts sort out problem flooring.
    There's a myriad of things I am not happy about as a landlord.
    I can't say a tenant replacing 7 year old carpet and lino at their own expense ranks in the top 10.

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  • carolines100
    replied
    Originally posted by dotchas View Post
    Not sure if this reply was for me
    No to the people earlier in the post who were saying it is the Ts sort out problem flooring.

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  • dotchas
    replied
    Originally posted by carolines100 View Post
    so if it's the T's responsibility, does that mean you have no problem with the T changing the floor covering? Ie replacing the carpet, lino etc?
    Not sure if this reply was for me, but i would happily replace worn flooring, carpet lino etc for my tenants. I would not exoect them to do so unless they had damaged the item themselves

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  • carolines100
    replied
    so if it's the T's responsibility, does that mean you have no problem with the T changing the floor covering? Ie replacing the carpet, lino etc?

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  • dotchas
    replied
    Certainly, when we have had long term tenants, we have replaced carpets and lino when required. There is no point upsetting good long term tenants over the cost of a carpet.

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  • mind the gap
    replied
    Retailers selling 'flooring' tend to mean any floor covering other than carpets, I.e., lino, cushionfloor/Amtico style vinyl sheet or tiles, laminate planks or tiles, solid or engineered wood,, or ceramic tiles - anything which is laid on top of the original floor structure.

    They do not usually mean the floor itself ( ie the base concrete or floorboards).

    Either way, if something underfoot is disintegrating, it is surely in the LL 's interests to replace/,repair it whether or not it falls within his statutory responsibility.

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  • mariner
    replied
    Were carpets included in move-in Inventory?
    I suspect T & OP means 'floor covering'.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    I think we need to know what the tenant means by "flooring" and what state it's in.

    A bathroom needs a floor.
    I don't think it's necessary for it to be any particular kind of floor, although it probably has to be fit for purpose and safe.

    But to me, "flooring" is what's underneath carpet or tiles, not the carpet or tiles themselves.

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  • thesaint
    replied
    Originally posted by Kay Powell View Post
    I think that you'll find that the landlord is responsible for replacing the flooring in the kitchen and bathroom because they must be easy to keep clean, but not responsible for other floor coverings.
    I would be grateful if you could provide a link to the relevant legislation.

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  • Kay Powell
    replied
    I think that you'll find that the landlord is responsible for replacing the flooring in the kitchen and bathroom because they must be easy to keep clean, but not responsible for other floor coverings.

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  • jjlandlord
    replied
    I don't think that there can be any claim of disrepair in relation to something that the landlord has no obligation to repair in the first place.

    If the carpets become a trip hazard then the tenant would have to remedy it.

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  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by thesaint View Post
    To answer your question.
    You are not responsible(no one is)for changing the floor coverings unless your contract(highly doubtful)says you are.
    I think you may be mistaken. If the flooring deteriorates to a point where it is a trip hazard and the T goes flying and knocks himself out on the door frame (as happened in a student house I know of) then I think you'll find that the LL was definitely in the wrong especially if the disrepair had been reported and he chose to ignore it.

    Even if it isnt as bad as a hazard, it is in the LL 's interests to replace deteriorating flooring - it is poor business practice to allow your rental properties to become scruffy through wear and tear.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    What type of flooring is it - carpet might need replacing after 7 years, but actual "flooring" seems a bit odd.

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