Tenancy Guarantees

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    #46
    I think you need to say to the solicitor: The agreement is for six months. I am right that I can't be responsible for any rent payable after the initial term expired, aren't I?

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      #47
      Hi,
      I’m new to all this, but have registered for some advice on guarantors.
      I have a tenant who signed a 12 month tenancy and their guarantor signed the form to be his guarantor,but the initial tenancy has expired now and the tenant has now signed a new tenancy agreement but what I want to know is...does the guarantor automatically roll over or do they need to resign a new form? The tenancy agreement hasn’t changed in any way.

      Thsnks

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        #48
        If the guarantee is drafted to refer only to the first tenancy then that is all it covers. Some guarantees purport to include future tenancies, but their vaildity is doubtful. If you let us know the wording of the guarantee we can offer an opinion.

        If the second tenancy has already been granted you cannot insist on a guarantee if the old guarantee has indeed expired.

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          #49
          It depends on what the guarantor form says.
          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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            #50
            Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
            The drafting is very amateurish. The agreement does not actually say as such that a tenancy is agreed, though that obviously has to be implied.

            Anyway, the key point is surely that the agreement is for six months and that the guarantor's liability (if there ever was any) does not extent to cover the statutory periodic tenancy.
            My solicitor is of the same opinion

            1) There never was a guarantee
            2) If there was it only covered the initial 6 months
            3) It is time barred

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              #51
              Originally posted by Little Swimmer View Post

              My solicitor is of the same opinion

              1) There never was a guarantee
              2) If there was it only covered the initial 6 months
              3) It is time barred
              I like your solicitor!

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                #52
                Time barred!
                I like that idea.

                Great to know, thanks for letting us know.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #53
                  Originally posted by Little Swimmer View Post

                  My solicitor is of the same opinion

                  1) There never was a guarantee
                  2) If there was it only covered the initial 6 months
                  3) It is time barred
                  Also added to this are implied terms, unfair terms and failing to mitigate loss
                  The total cost to go to trial is more than £17,000 per side and £2,000 court costs. The total costs are £10,000 more than the original debt.

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                    #54
                    Very puzzled about the wording in a recently received Tenancy Guarantor form I need to sign. It suggests that by defaulting, the tenant is made bankrupt !
                    I appreciate the liability to the guarantor, but defaulting does not IMHO represent a bankruptcy, and have queried this wording with the agency. Just posting here as the agency is well known, and surprised at this form of words.

                    2. "If the Tenant defaults during the initial Term or an extension, renewal or continuation of the Agreement whether fixed term or periodic the Tenant is declared bankrupt and the Tenant's Trustee in Bankruptcy elects to disclaim the Agreement then on written demand the Guarantor will pay cover and compensate the Landlord for all losses, claims, liabilities, costs legal fees and expenses arising out of or due to that default or disclaimer or incurred by the Landlord due to the default or disclaimer."

                    The last bit also looks like repeated text.

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                      #55
                      I think it's missing an ", or" in there so it becomes:

                      ... whether fixed term or periodic, or the Tenant is declared bankrupt and the Tenant's Trustee in Bankruptcy elects to disclaim ...
                      I am not a lawyer, nor am I licensed to provide any regulated advice. None of my posts should be treated as legal or financial advice.

                      I do not answer questions through private messages which should be posted publicly on the forum.

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                        #56
                        Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post

                        I like your solicitor!
                        Hi Lawcruncher,

                        We have settled out of court and all payments have been paid and legal fees settled. I have received a letter from the court saying that the judge has refused discontinuation. Why would that be? What are the next steps? The letter of discontinuation was done on their solicitors letterhead and not on form N279. Could this be a factor?

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                          #57
                          Little Swimmer,

                          Sorry but I cannot answer that as I was never a litigator. I suggest you post your question here: http://swarblaw.co.uk/viewforum.php?...afccafda42bbfd

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