Breach of Contract

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    Breach of Contract

    I need some advice.

    We have tenants who have broken the tenancy agreement. It states that there should be no pets, but they have 3 dogs. The neighbour has complained and we have asked for the dogs to be removed from the property. The tenants are saying that if the dogs go they go, but they want their money back for the period they will not be living at the property.

    Is this correct or do they forefiet the money as they have signed a 6 month lease and have breached the contract? Also do they have to pay for the full 6 months that they are contacted to?

    #2
    Originally posted by d_etherington View Post
    I need some advice.

    We have tenants who have broken the tenancy agreement. It states that there should be no pets, but they have 3 dogs. The neighbour has complained and we have asked for the dogs to be removed from the property. The tenants are saying that if the dogs go they go, but they want their money back for the period they will not be living at the property.

    Is this correct or do they forefiet the money as they have signed a 6 month lease and have breached the contract? Also do they have to pay for the full 6 months that they are contacted to?
    Your tenants have signed a contract to say no pets and also that they will stay for 6 months. This is what they have already agreed.

    Issue a breach notice and request that the dogs are removed within 14 days.
    If they then want to surrender the tenancy, you can still charge them rent until such a time as a new tenant moves in, together with your re-letting costs.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Colincbayley View Post
      ... you can still charge them rent until such a time as a new tenant moves in, together with your re-letting costs.
      Plus professional cleaners if you see dog hairs anywhere once they leave (you may after all have targeted tenants who need a pet-free house - maybe they have an allergy). Also, it is reasonable to have a fleaman visit a couple of times if they are unable to provide evidence of ongoing anti-flea treatment.
      On some things I am very knowledgeable, on other things I am stupid. Trouble is, sometimes I discover that the former is the latter or vice versa, and I don't know this until later - maybe even much later. Because of the number of posts I have done, I am now a Senior Member. However, read anything I write with the above in mind.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Esio Trot View Post
        Plus professional cleaners if you see dog hairs anywhere once they leave (you may after all have targeted tenants who need a pet-free house - maybe they have an allergy). Also, it is reasonable to have a fleaman visit a couple of times if they are unable to provide evidence of ongoing anti-flea treatment.
        Assuming that the landlord has a dual signed inventory that details the condition of the property and can form the basis of any deductions made.

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