Condensation between window panes - tenant or Landlord responsibility?

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    Condensation between window panes - tenant or Landlord responsibility?

    Hi 3 of my double glazed windows have got condensation in between the panes. I have contacted my landlord about this who has said condensation is the responsibility of the tenant and I will have to get them sorted or he will deduct money from my bond after I leave to cover the cost. I have had a quick look online and it will probably cost me around £100-£150 to replace the 3 windows. It started with only 1 window in the conservatory but a month later both the bedroom windows have gone the same way.

    There are a few people talking about a repair but most say they are unreliable and the window will mist up again shortly after. From what I have read online the main reason this seems to happen is due to damaged seals, something about the seals blowing? If this is the case should I be responsible for paying for it?

    I have a standard shorthold tenancy with the following clause; "The tenant must ensure the property is properly ventilated and heated to ensure the prevention of dampness caused by excessive condensation. Any repairs or arising as a result will be the responsibility of the tenant."

    The house is well ventilated and the heating is on a timer so I can't see it being something I have done wrong, is this a separate issue?

    Thank you.

    #2
    I think your landlord has misunderstood. He probably thought you meant condensation on the inside of the window, which 99% of the time is due to tenants drying clothes indoors, and not ventilating. I suggest you call back & explain.

    Comment


      #3
      Thought from the thread title you were going to be a silly landlord trying to get your tenant to pay for a blown double glazing unit.

      Unless you've soecifically damaged the window to allow this to happen I'd say it's part of the fabric of the building and most definately the LL's problem.
      "I'm afraid I didn't do enough background checks apart from checking her identity on Facebook" - ANON

      What I say is based on my own experience and research - Please don't take as gospel without first checking the gospel yourself.

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        #4
        Agreed. I don't think a Tenant can be responsible for blown double-glazing. I have a couple of windows that do this in my own home... I did nothing for this to happen, sometimes it just does. I'm steeling myself to get them sorted but, for now, I'll live with it.

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          #5
          Thanks guys, I will give him a call tomorrow and double check he knows the situation first. It might be that I didn't explain well, or maybe he heard condensation and tuned out. Will come back to you once I speak with him.

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            #6
            It certainly isn't your responsibility to fix. But at the same time L is not responsible for replacing every double glazed pane as it blows.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
              But at the same time L is not responsible for replacing every double glazed pane as it blows.

              I don't agree, surely this would come under L&T repairing obligation to keep the fabric of the building in repair.

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                #8
                Ok, I have phoned the landlord and he knows what the situation is. He has said the only way the windows would go like that is if there was condensation inside the house in the first place for it to get into the windows. If there was no condensation inside then there would be nothing to get inside the windows regardless on the condition of the seals. I have noticed the seals on the outside of the conservatory curl in at the corners so I think that might be where the water got in, the others in the house don't do this though. They are all cut at 45% in the corners.

                I do dry my clothes indoors once a week on the radiators. I don't have any washing line or tumble dryer so it's my only option really. There are trickle vents on all the windows and the heating is set to come on once every 4 hours for 1/2 an hour each time so the house is kept at a good temperature. I haven't seen any condensation on the windows or window sills since I have been here so if there is some it's not a lot.

                Regarding the urgency in fixing; The bedroom ones don't really bother me as I rarely spend any time in there, except to sleep, and the curtains are closed unless I'm cleaning so I rarely see them. The conservatory one is a bit worse as it's right in the centre of the room so your eye gets drawn to it when you go in, with no blinds etc it's not great to look at I have to say.

                Anyway, my main concern is the money will be taken from my bond at the end. It is protected, although I can't remember who with. So do I have anything to worry about in this regard? Thank you.

                Comment


                  #9
                  The seals on his windows have broken down, it is nothing to do with any condensation caused by you. However, don't dry your clothes inside the property as this will cause other problems in the house.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks Claymore. I don't have a washing line or a dryer (or the space to put either) so have to dry them indoors really. I guess the compromise would be to only do it in the bathroom on an airer but without the direct heat of the radiators it would take much longer so the moisture would hang around for longer. Would there be any benefit from doing it that way? Trickle vents are always open whether I'm drying clothes or not.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by yorkshire_rose View Post
                      He has said the only way the windows would go like that is if there was condensation inside the house in the first place for it to get into the windows.
                      Complete and utter hogwash. Not even slightly up for debate. You could have double glazing on the windows of a Turkish bath and they wouldn't steam up internally. As anyone who has double glazing will know, the sealed units do fail sometimes, and in practice there's nothing that the resident can have done to cause it. The space between the panes is usually under a partial vacuum; the seals fail with time and air then gets sucked in to the gap. This air, whether from inside or outside the house, will contain some moisture, and that will tend to condense on the cool glass, misting it up or even pooling at the bottom of the gap.

                      It's definitely down to the landlord to replace them; whether you consider it worth pressing the matter with him is another question.

                      If he attempts to make a deduction from the deposit, assuming it's properly protected you simply challenge it and I can't imagine anybody (court or arbitration scheme) will agree with the landlord on this. It's such a complete no-brainer though, it would be nicer if he could be made to see the error of his thinking before it comes to that. I'm sure some googling will turn up some decent links to send him.

                      I do agree with Claymore though; especially as it sounds like this clown will inevitably be looking for excuses to take money from your deposit.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think the only thing for the OP to do is to wait a while (just to take the heat out of things) and then write to the landlord and ask him to repair the windows.
                        I would mention that you have "taken advice" which has confirmed that there is no possible way that the double glazing seal could be damaged by any internal condensation and that therefore the units have failed.

                        At least it might encourage the landlord to substantiate/google their odd ideas.
                        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                        Comment


                          #13
                          3 d/g seals have failed, not T damage. Neither is LL under any obligation to replace the units as the glass is not broken and they are still functional as windows, however unsightly as 'misting' may be.
                          Buy yourself an outdoor clothes line to use.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I know a landlord who has the most disgustingly misted units you have ever seen. I was asked to find tenants for him and I was truly embarrassed by the windows. I tried very very hard to get the landlord to change them, saying it wasn't fair on the tenant - they couldn't see out of the window. The landlord was adamant he would not change them. I even explained how cheap it is to have it done, how I couldn't see anyone wanting to stay long term etc etc. The landlord is a multimillionaire and his home is like a plush palace!

                            It surprises me how people can have such high standards for themselves and expect others to live in such horrible conditions without batting an eyelid.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I agree with Claymore , blown double glazing can be a perennial problem and is a No Fault situation from the standpoint of the Tenant: if the units were FENSA installed there is normally a guarantee in place and the original installers can be called back (assuming they are still in business) , if not then the Landlord has to unenviable task of having the units replaced at some point and without recourse to the tenant. The windows are part of the basic fabric of the building and the responsibility of the owner , whether they are remedied is down to the Landlord , no-one can force him/her to do the works but it doesn't look good if at some point the same tenant is being asked to pay more rent.

                              Comment

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