Repairs

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    Repairs

    Am I correct in saying a landlord is obligated to repair/maintain the structure and exterior of the property?

    Who is responsible for repairs to internal doors (furniture - handles etc)?

    #2
    The landlord. However, if my tenant had broken them, I might tell him to pay for it.
    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

    Comment


      #3
      I understand you are a landlord.

      If you don't know that you own the property, and that you are letting the property, therefore a tenant is renting the door handles, the door, the boiler, the carpet, the front driveway, and inclusive furniture etc, off you, then you need to step back and evaluate your possition as a landlord, and get up to speed in exactly what the tenant is renting off you.

      everything in that house / flat belongs to you, you purchased it all, and the tenant rents everything from you.

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        #4
        Please see this link from RLA website, in particular Section D, Statutory Repairing Obligations, in particular section 4.4 - 4.6.

        http://www.rla.org.uk/landlord/guide.../repairs.shtml

        If this information is correct, I would like to know the source of the information - ie, statute

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          #5
          S11, 1985 LL& T Act

          Repairs are usually covered by Section 11, 1985 LL & T Act ...

          http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1985/70/section/11
          Fed up with nitpickers and rivet counters...

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            #6
            It looks like the link on the RLA website, is laymans for the repairs under the Section 11, 1985 LL & T Act. Does anyone agree with me or am I totally misinterpreting this?

            Many times on this forum I have seen it posted that a landlords repairing obligations are to the structure and the exterior of the dwelling. All other repairs undertaken are either common law (which isn't enforceable) or contractual law (perhaps as set out in an AST agreement).

            As a landlord, I do all repairs in a timely manner which have included repairs to internal doors and the furniture (handles). I am quite happy to continue to do this, but, I would if it is true, like to point out to my tenant, that although I am doing these repairs, I am not obliged to do them.

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              #7
              Another link I have found - a Government body website actually states

              The tenant is responsible for:
              hinges, locks and handles to internal doors
              kitchen and bedroom unit doors, door hinges, handles and catches on drawers
              draught proofing of doors and windows
              replacement of broken glass

              See link here:

              http://www.nidirect.gov.uk/landlord-...sponsibilities

              Albeit, I think this could be referring to Landlord and Tenants in Housing Association Properties, however, I can't see any reason why this should be different to regular landlords.

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                #8
                That link is for Northern Ireland. Is your property in Northern Ireland?

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                  #9
                  LOL - I wondered what the NI stood for. No not Northern Ireland.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Smudgie View Post

                    The tenant is responsible for:
                    hinges, locks and handles to internal doors
                    kitchen and bedroom unit doors, door hinges, handles and catches on drawers
                    draught proofing of doors and windows
                    replacement of broken glass
                    Remind me to never rent off you.

                    I will not replace worn out hinges, worn out locks, faulty locks, seized locks, worn out handles, lose doors, worn out / damaged draught proofing on standard or double glazed windows, replacing cracked glass that was there prior to renting.
                    All that is all fair wear and tear.

                    sounds like you want to get out of repair / replacement of items that belong to you, for which the tenant is renting off you.

                    Am no longer watching this thread, as you put landlords to shame.

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                      #11
                      Really laughing now RAM. I am not a bad landlord at all. I simply want to know if I am obliged by law to repair internal door furniture or am I doing it because I am a decent landlord?

                      I have no intentions of not repairing internal door furniture. Obviously RaM, like myself you are unclear on the law otherwise you would have clarified it for me :-)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        As RaM thinks I am such a bad landlord, I will explain my situation a little.

                        I consider myself a decent landlord, beautiful properties all maintained to a high standard. All properties have a 'full' quality renovation before letting and are desirable to most tenants. I have always kept my rents very low in order to keep my tenants in place and happy.

                        I have one tenant who has been extremely bad at giving me 'reasonable access' to do some repairs. Previously, my tenant smashed a door open because the lock had failed. The cost to me was in excess of £150 when you added together the price of a new door, a carpenter and then painting of the door. Tenant informed me three months ago of another handle which has started to fail. I have desperately tried to get access to replace the handle but tenant went very quiet and has not replied to telephone calls or letters. During this time, I have been quite worried due to the previous damage caused. Roll forward, out of the blue I get a phone call saying when am I coming to repair handle as one of their guests got stuck in the downstairs cloakroom? Obviously, I don't want another door smashed open. I would expect my tenant to give me reasonable access to do the repair and not expect me to 'jump' to demands after failing to give me access for the past three months.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          It is generally accepted with ASTs, that LL has repair/maintenance resp for 'fabric' of property both internal & external. Things break, LL fixes, but can charge cost to T if evident damage due to T, or excluded by AST eg repairing 'white' goods. Most LLs will repair, rather than letting T repair. If demands too frequent, then valid s21 at ealiest opp.
                          Rent is not just profit and most LL resps can be offset by tax allowance for rental repairs.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I've yet to hear a landlord say other than they are a good landlord.

                            Or any other man say he is a bad driver.

                            The assessment of others (eg tenants....) is more informative
                            I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Smudgie - I don't think the issue here is the legal position... you freely state you'll do the repairs as a matter of course anyway. Like me, I prefer to not worry about things like the legal position, I just go about getting things repaired - it is, after all my asset, and I want it to be in good nick all the time. If things start to degrade then I'm pretty sure the Tenants wouldn't look after it as well. If they see me caring about it, I think that passes on (with normal people) to their approach.

                              However, you appear to be searching for a legal position on this because you've somehow ended up in a fit of pique (or something like that) with your Tenant due to their lack of communication while you've been trying your best and their sudden demand arrives out of nowhere. There's no room for this in our lives, really. Yes, it's not great of them to behave like this, of course, but it doesn't materially change the fact regarding the repair at the end of the day. So just get on and do it and everyone will be happy... if you are able to be there in present when the repair is being done, and the Tenant is too, maybe there's time to have a polite, calm, measured verbal 'reset' regarding what you expect in terms of communication in the future... and see how it goes. At the same time, you can try to conduct an informal (or even formal) inspection. If you're not happy with the way things are... move to eviction and start again (as it appears the relationship may be breaking down anyway).

                              I have a Tenant in property where the fence came down in the really bad weather recently. The fencing materials were delivered on a Friday for fitting the entire new fence on the Monday. On Sunday the Tenant cancelled the fitting with a reason that really didn't make sense to me. Leaving all the fencing in the back garden, unsecured. It's now coming into the second week it's been sat there and I've not had a reschedule for the fitting and, of course, the guys doing it are busy with other things, so we need to liaise properly - it's all about communication. I could throttle this Tenant, but I won't. If all the stuff is nicked from the garden before it's put into the ground, then I find myself wondering if I'll be liable for its replacement... I'm hoping not. I asked if it was secured and obscured from prying eyes - I did get a response, it's not. Is this relationship breaking down too? I don't know, but I know I expect more, I'll not get snotty with them, but I'm filing this experience away too.

                              I find that, sometimes, people don't think beyond the immediate. You tried to get in touch with your Tenant to fix something and they didn't return your contact. Now it really matters to them, it's urgent. I bet when their guest got stuck in the cloakroom the air was blue with comments about you... "I've been asking my Landlord for weeks to look at this, I'm so sorry, this is so embarrassing, I'll be onto Smudgie first thing in the morning, this isn't acceptable at all - Smudgie has repairing obligations, after all" ...and blame cast elsewhere willy-nilly. Were your ears burning at around the time this incident happened?

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