Tennant changing light bulb issues

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    I'd foot the bill and change the transformer type lightfitting to an ordinary single bulb pendant type. Then you don't ever have to think about it again.

    If there are other 'posh' lightfittings I'd also change them for something plain and simple.

    Comment


      #17
      Thanks for the replies, seems a bit of a 'grey' area as I'd suspected. The only issue is that this is the first time in over 23 years of letting the property that this occurred.
      Guess put it down to ignorance by the T.

      Comment


        #18
        When things like this happen, I always tell a tenant that is insistent that there is a problem that they will pay for the contractor if there is nothing found.
        If there is a problem, I will obviously pay for the contractor, and any further costs required.
        Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

        Comment


          #19
          Ditto. Strangely this usually makes the 'problem' go away by itself.

          Comment


            #20
            A blanket requirement for a tenant to pay a "wasted" call out charge is likely to be held to be an unfair term. A very rough and ready test of reasonableness is whether a landlord, not having specialist knowledge, would, if he were living in the property, have called the specialist in. Including me, there are three contributors to this thread who did not know that "if there is a transformer that is expecting the load from 4 bulbs, but only one is fitted, it is possible that the rise in voltage causes the one remaining one to burn out quicker."

            Comment


              #21
              Lawcruncher,

              When I read the OP, that was the first thing on my mind. Others had already questioned it.
              If the landlord had not conveyed this to the tenant, then I agree that he should pay for the contractor.

              I have a friend whom has about 12 of these downlighters in her kitchen, and only has 2 or 3 working at any one time. I have told her for about 4 years why they continue to blow, but she chooses not to fit a full set. You just can't help some people.

              In regards to a blanket requirement, I don't have one. I always troubleshoot on the phone first. If they then want a contractor, I then tell them they will be charged.

              The last time this happened to me was when a tenants kettle was throwing the miniature circuit breaker. I told them over the phone that it was their kettle, but they insisted that because it was brand new, it couldn't be, and an electrician needed to check the circuit.
              Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by thesaint View Post
                If they then want a contractor, I then tell them they will be charged.
                The point is I think that if a landlord calls in a contractor that is his decision. He has to take the risk if there is a problem which is not down to the tenant. It is not entirely unreasonable to tell a tenant he will have to pay if the problem is down to him, but I think what you need is probably for the tenant to agree he will pay if that is the case. Whatever the tenancy agreement says, the specific agreement of the tenant should be obtained after the problem has arisen.

                Comment


                  #23
                  So take this one on the chin, and spell it out next time.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                    The point is I think that if a landlord calls in a contractor that is his decision. He has to take the risk if there is a problem which is not down to the tenant. It is not entirely unreasonable to tell a tenant he will have to pay if the problem is down to him, but I think what you need is probably for the tenant to agree he will pay if that is the case. Whatever the tenancy agreement says, the specific agreement of the tenant should be obtained after the problem has arisen.
                    The bolded is exactly my position.
                    If I am certain there is no problem, then I say I am not sending anyone.

                    If they are adamant, then they can pay for the contractor that I send, or get their own.
                    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                    Comment

                    Latest Activity

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X