Electricity report fail, can Tenant still move in?

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    Electricity report fail, can Tenant still move in?

    I have just had an Electricity report and PAT testing done on a rental property, it has come back as a fail due to the fuse box, not quite sure why as I have lived there myself and never had any problems with it.

    Anyway I have a new tenant about to move in, do I need to get a new fuse box in order to get a pass on the report, I know the electricity certificate is not a mandatory anyway although the letting agency insisted on it.

    Thank you for the advice.

    #2
    The tenant can move in, but I am not sure of what your actual question is?
    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

    Comment


      #3
      If the fuse box has failed you should get a new one. How would feel if the T got elecrocuted?

      Although I'm not an electrical expert (that's what electricians are for) I think the old fuse boxes don't have enough fuses on them for the modern home. The fuses might not be the correct 'strength' for the items such as a shower or cooker. It might not be earthed properly. Ask some local electricians for quotes to replace it. They're called consumer units these days.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Matthew_1000 View Post
        do I need to get a new fuse box in order to get a pass on the report.
        I would (and have). You are legally required to ensure that the property is safe, so in the event of any future incident involving electrics you would be liable to get sued. Although a certificate is not a legal requirement, it is a defence which most seem to agree would probably stand up in court.
        There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

        Comment


          #5
          At a guess you have an old unit with cartridge fuses rather than little circuit switches?

          Building Regs are quite onerous for an old-to-current consumer unit swap as they require all circuits to be tested again after the swap and usually upgrades to earth bonding for gas, water & central heating pipes will be needed too (this might require some shenanigans to get the earth wires around the building that increases labour costs).

          As a result, even though a populated unit can be had for £85-ish, you are probably looking at £5-600 or so, including the required notification and certificate.

          Has to either be performed by a full Part P sparky (the one who did your inspection should be) who will sort out the notification and certificate or can be done by a "competent person" and then inspected by Building Control who will issue the certificate. The former is best to avoid to and fro.

          Definitely an item to add to the checklist when viewing a property (very old fuse boxes were often mounted on an asbestos back panel too....).

          Comment


            #6
            Matthew_1000,

            Oh, let me guess, did they quote for the new fuse box?

            If you have a tenant due to move in, I would let him move in.
            To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Matthew_1000 View Post
              although the letting agency insisted on it.
              I wonder why? Maybe (just a wild guess) they also suggested which electrician you could employ for finding out?

              In the end it depends on your attitude to risk - if something does go wrong it is certainly better to have a certificate stating that the systems were okay - but not having one does not state that you were negligent.

              Comment


                #8
                "it has come back as a fail" you say - what exactly did the EICR have written on it?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Get your own sparky to check it out - 2nd opinion
                  I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mattl View Post
                    but not having one does not state that you were negligent.
                    Having received one with the word "unsafe" on it and taking no action would though.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Refurb to Rent View Post
                      Building Regs are quite onerous for an old-to-current consumer unit swap as they require all circuits to be tested again after the swap
                      It's not so much that; more because a new consumer unit with an RCD is so much more sensitive to faults than a wired fusebox. If you were to swap in a new consumer unit, chances are that it would instantly trip on at least one circuit (caused by eg very slight and hitherto undetected earth leakage). There then follows a lengthy period of fault diagnosis tracking down the problem, which could be anywhere in the property, before the new unit can even be used.

                      Because of this, it's common for electricians to give hefty quotes for this job, to cover themselves in the event of lengthy problems like this. A good one would provide a quote with a wide range and then charge according to actual time spent, but I suspect that most find it easier to charge the fixed price.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Back to the core question - we can't advise until we know what exactly was said on the report....

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Whatever risk you choose to take with your own fusebox is up to you. But when you start letting, you need to take into account the welfare of your tenants. If anything did happen like a tenant getting electrocuted or a fire caused by an electrical fault, you WOULD be found negligent - especially when it came to light that you had an electrical inspection which failed the consumer unit.

                          Let the tenant move in, but get some quotes and get an updated consumer unit installed pronto.
                          IANAL (I am not a lawyer). Anything I say here is just an opinion, so should not be relied upon! Always check your facts with a professional who really knows their onions.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Grrr View Post
                            you WOULD be found negligent - especially when it came to light that you had an electrical inspection which failed the consumer unit.
                            So you're saying that it is better to not have an inspection in the first place than to have one which failed and to not act upon it?

                            Good to know

                            I don't think this would stand in court though.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by mattl View Post

                              I don't think this would stand in court though.
                              Not a risk I would want to take. Faulty, out of date electrics can and do kill.
                              IANAL (I am not a lawyer). Anything I say here is just an opinion, so should not be relied upon! Always check your facts with a professional who really knows their onions.

                              Comment

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