my 1st house, do i rent to tenants or lodgers?

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  • jeffrey
    replied
    Originally posted by lisa belfast View Post
    can anyone help im looking to rent a house in belfast with private lanlord how do i search for them on internet
    NB: this forum is chiefly re England/Wales anyway. Law is different in Northern Ireland (and in Scotland).

    Leave a comment:


  • RichieP
    replied
    can anyone help im looking to rent a house in belfast with private lanlord how do i search for them on internet
    The first thing to do is to learn some 'netiquette', and not hijack random threads in forums.

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  • lisa belfast
    replied
    couple looking to rent a house in belfast

    can anyone help im looking to rent a house in belfast with private lanlord how do i search for them on internet

    Leave a comment:


  • lisa belfast
    replied
    couple looking to rent a house in belfast

    im looking to rent a house in belfast how do i search for lanlords in belfast

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Originally posted by patrickyuis View Post
    hmmm....so when it states TWO people would that include myself? or TWO additional ppl?

    thanks
    If you are owner and occupy it, para. 6 (not 7) would apply.
    It states that property not a HIMO if occupied only by owner, his household, and "no more than such number of other persons as is specified...in regulations...", ie in a Statutory Instrument. I don't know if there is any such SI yet. Also, para.6 does not apply to converted block of flats under s.257 but can apply to individual flats!

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  • patrickyuis
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
    Paragraph 7 in Schedule 14 to Housing Act 2004 states clearly that "Any building which is occupied only by two persons who form two households" is NOT a HMO except re Part I of Act (Housing Conditions/standards/improvement notices/etc.)
    hmmm....so when it states TWO people would that include myself? or TWO additional ppl?

    thanks

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  • jeffrey
    replied
    Paragraph 7 in Schedule 14 to Housing Act 2004 states clearly that "Any building which is occupied only by two persons who form two households" is NOT a HMO except re Part I of Act (Housing Conditions/standards/improvement notices/etc.)

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  • Bel
    replied
    Originally posted by patrickyuis View Post
    "But under the new Bill any more than 2 unrelated persons sharing a house or flat will constitute an HMO"

    i just read that from the article on landlordzone

    but im wondering whether 'anymore than 2', will that include 2....or do you think it means 3 or more people?

    thanks again guys
    Suggest you post on the HMO forum, as this may catch other members eyes.

    Its always best that you check with your Local authority as you have already done...as interpretations can vary from place to place. Doesn't mean to say that the person you spoke to is correct, or I am either....I just go on what I have researched for myself. It would be financially be worth your while to argue your case for sure with your local authority.

    Did you specifically say that you owned the home and wanted to take in 2 lodgers? Saying 'students' is a bit like a red rag to a bull.
    If he thought that you were a tenant also then 3+ is an HMO.

    There is loads of evidence on the net that 2 lodgers are acceptable, including Tessa Sheperston (residential lettings specialist lawyer) on her site.

    http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:u...gl=uk&ie=UTF-8

    http://www.landlordinfo.co.uk/whatisanhmo.php look under 'exemptions'

    Leave a comment:


  • patrickyuis
    replied
    "But under the new Bill any more than 2 unrelated persons sharing a house or flat will constitute an HMO"

    i just read that from the article on landlordzone

    but im wondering whether 'anymore than 2', will that include 2....or do you think it means 3 or more people?

    thanks again guys

    Leave a comment:


  • patrickyuis
    replied
    hey Bel thanks for the advice, im jsut about to read it over now.

    BUT one thing, i just spoke to someone at the local council and he said that it would definetly have to be classed as a HMO because i have TWO people living there, he explained that if they were related then that would count, but since im renting out to student which arent related then he said it would be classed as HMO.

    and explained that i would have to go through all the security checks and get my house inspected etc

    then i told him that i have a 3 storey house, and he said that i would have to get a specific £3,000 alarm because of the fact that its a 3 storey house, and fire doors for the tenants etc.

    he didnt sound too sure, but did seem like he was reading it off some paper.......so i dont know whether he's right?

    but if he is, then does it really cost this much AND this much hassle just to rent two rooms out? im sure there must be a way around this......im not splashing out £3000 on an alarm lol

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  • Bel
    replied
    Originally posted by Wickerman
    But does that apply to any property alterations?

    If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck there is a good chance it tastes good with hoi sin sauce.

    One for the HMO experts methinks!
    Property alterations?

    After re-reading the post; LL would have to live there for 2 other occupiers to be called "lodgers" ; which would not be HMO. see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums...hlight=lodgers

    If it is not landlords main abode then room occupiers would be tenants. 2 room occupiers + occasional guests not an HMO. 3 unrelated room occupiers is an HMO.

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  • jeffrey
    replied
    House
    in
    Multiple
    Occupation.

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  • patrickyuis
    replied
    Originally posted by Bel View Post
    I believe that you are allowed 2 lodgers without it being an HMO if you own the property. So no worries on that score.
    sorry if i sound stupid, but i dont know what HMO stands for either (newbie) lol

    when you mean own the property, do you mean in respect of freehold and leasehold?

    beacause i paid for this house in cash so there is no morgtage, and it was for a leasehold of 250 years.

    so in that instance would it be considered that i own the property?

    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Colincbayley
    replied
    Originally posted by Wickerman
    But does that apply to any property alterations?

    If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck there is a good chance it tastes good with hoi sin sauce.

    One for the HMO experts methinks!
    It could of course be a chicken with a personality complex!
    Although still good fried !!!!!!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bel
    replied
    Originally posted by Wickerman
    Hmmm this is an interesting one.



    And finally... you will be creating a HMO (although more than likely not licensable). You may need to upgrade the doors to fire doors and take other precautions. Again speak to your local council regarding this and get them round.
    I believe that you are allowed 2 lodgers without it being an HMO if you own the property. So no worries on that score.

    Leave a comment:

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