Problems with rodent infestation: mouse/mice/rats/etc.

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    Mouse/mice/rodent infestation- use wooden flooring?

    I am looking for a good wooden look with easy maintenance. I have a few options and I am not sure what to go for. So I would like your view and what do you use. We have had a few mice in the house.

    1. Sanded floor boards - hard wearing and easy to sort out if tenant damages with furniture and water. As flooring is exposed then easy to get to pipes under floorboards if pipes are leaking. Down side - cost to create, possible draft & mouse can go through the gaps in the floorboards.

    2. Lino that looks like wooden floor- good quality Not damages by water/wine spills. Cheap to put in and replace. Easy to lift up if you need access to under the floor boards say if there is a leak with the radiator pipes. MIce cannot crawl through the lino as floor is compelely covered Down side - does not look completely like wooden floor - can have ripples in the floor over time - can ripe with furniture movement.

    3. Laminate floor - good quatlity recommended for bathroom&kitchens from trade shop. Looks great. Mice cannot crawl through the flooring as it is completely covered. Down side Expensive to buy & install. If leave under floor boards then need to remove all the flooring to get to it.


    I would like to use Lino as it is cheap & prevent mouse access; but feel that when layed it will not look good and in time will easily tear with furniture movement. I want to be able to charge good higher rent but if the lino looks bad or low quality flooring then I will have to drop the rent...

    What do you think and what do you use???

    Comment


      Originally posted by BusyLandlord View Post
      I am looking for a good wooden look with easy maintenance. I have a few options and I am not sure what to go for. So I would like your view and what do you use. We have had a few mice in the house.

      1. Sanded floor boards - hard wearing and easy to sort out if tenant damages with furniture and water. As flooring is exposed then easy to get to pipes under floorboards if pipes are leaking. Down side - cost to create, possible draft & mouse can go through the gaps in the floorboards.

      2. Lino that looks like wooden floor- good quality Not damages by water/wine spills. Cheap to put in and replace. Easy to lift up if you need access to under the floor boards say if there is a leak with the radiator pipes. MIce cannot crawl through the lino as floor is compelely covered Down side - does not look completely like wooden floor - can have ripples in the floor over time - can ripe with furniture movement.

      3. Laminate floor - good quatlity recommended for bathroom&kitchens from trade shop. Looks great. Mice cannot crawl through the flooring as it is completely covered. Down side Expensive to buy & install. If leave under floor boards then need to remove all the flooring to get to it.


      I would like to use Lino as it is cheap & prevent mouse access; but feel that when layed it will not look good and in time will easily tear with furniture movement. I want to be able to charge good higher rent but if the lino looks bad or low quality flooring then I will have to drop the rent...

      What do you think and what do you use???
      Well, personally, I wouldn't even contemplate 1 or 3. The cost would be much higher and I would be amazed if you were able to increase the rent sufficiently to compensate. Perhaps more importantly, 1 and 3 have much higher long term maintenance costs and will be alot more hassle.

      Good luck!

      Preston

      Comment


        Originally posted by Preston View Post
        Well, personally, I wouldn't even contemplate 1 or 3. The cost would be much higher and I would be amazed if you were able to increase the rent sufficiently to compensate. Perhaps more importantly, 1 and 3 have much higher long term maintenance costs and will be alot more hassle.

        Good luck!

        Preston
        Thanks for your valued advice Preston it is very much appreciated. We are looking at putting Lino now. Just need to ensure the flooring is flat enough for the flooring to go down OK.

        Thanks.

        Comment


          HI,

          I have to disagree with Preston about laminate flooring and sanded boards, although to some extent, it depends how much you are willing to spend.

          We have had 'aqualoc' laminate in the ground floor and the bathroom of a 6 bed. student house for 3 years now. It has been subjected to the usual range of appalling things that students can do to floors, but it still looks very good. It costs about twice as much as the bog-standard non-waterproof stuff, but it is lots tougher and if laid correctly can be used in kitchens and bathrooms, as ours is. You need a sub-layer of foam or felt to go with the product you buy - you can't just whack them down on the floor. To be waterproof, the joints need gluing, not just clicking together. This means that if you need to get under the floorboards, it's hell's own job.

          Sanded floors can also look good and be very practical, as long as they are well-prepared (boards checked for faults/cracks and all nails sunk before sanding), and coated with at least 3 coasts of yacht varnish. Don't use anything else especially not the water based ones which claim you can walk on it in 3 hours. They are rubbish and flake off in weeks. Semi-matt yacht varnish gives an aesthetically pleasing and durable finish.

          Wood effect lino ? Looks a bit naff and as you say, tends to ripple up unless glued down onto a special screed, which costs a lot. You cannot just lay it on top of a wooden floor. It will look awful and it will crack.

          If I were you, I would go for the best value option (assuming floorboards are decent) : well-sanded floorboards + yacht varnish + rugs.

          Mouse problem : I honestly don't think the type of flooring you choose will make any difference. Best solutions:

          1. A cat
          2. One of those plug in emitter of high-pitched noise audible only to mice - they hate them
          3. Humane mouse trap - catch and release the blighter at least one mile away.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

          Comment


            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
            HI,

            I have to disagree with Preston about laminate flooring and sanded boards, although to some extent, it depends how much you are willing to spend.

            We have had 'aqualoc' laminate in the ground floor and the bathroom of a 6 bed. student house for 3 years now. It has been subjected to the usual range of appalling things that students can do to floors, but it still looks very good. It costs about twice as much as the bog-standard non-waterproof stuff, but it is lots tougher and if laid correctly can be used in kitchens and bathrooms, as ours is. You need a sub-layer of foam or felt to go with the product you buy - you can't just whack them down on the floor. To be waterproof, the joints need gluing, not just clicking together. This means that if you need to get under the floorboards, it's hell's own job.

            Sanded floors can also look good and be very practical, as long as they are well-prepared (boards checked for faults/cracks and all nails sunk before sanding), and coated with at least 3 coasts of yacht varnish. Don't use anything else especially not the water based ones which claim you can walk on it in 3 hours. They are rubbish and flake off in weeks. Semi-matt yacht varnish gives an aesthetically pleasing and durable finish.

            Wood effect lino ? Looks a bit naff and as you say, tends to ripple up unless glued down onto a special screed, which costs a lot. You cannot just lay it on top of a wooden floor. It will look awful and it will crack.

            If I were you, I would go for the best value option (assuming floorboards are decent) : well-sanded floorboards + yacht varnish + rugs.

            Mouse problem : I honestly don't think the type of flooring you choose will make any difference. Best solutions:

            1. A cat
            2. One of those plug in emitter of high-pitched noise audible only to mice - they hate them
            3. Humane mouse trap - catch and release the blighter at least one mile away.
            Thanks you Mind the Gap.

            We do have one room in the house with wooden flooring and we are happy with it. We currently have a casual mouse (3 sightings in 6months in whole house) problem and the mouse catcher from pest control said that we need to put wire wood along all boards that have a slightly narrow than a pen gap. This is the reason I am considering covering the whole lot.

            The room is very big & sanded look I refer but what about having to push all that wire wool between the boards...

            Comment


              Originally posted by BusyLandlord View Post
              Thanks you Mind the Gap.

              We do have one room in the house with wooden flooring and we are happy with it. We currently have a casual mouse (3 sightings in 6months in whole house) problem and the mouse catcher from pest control said that we need to put wire wood along all boards that have a slightly narrow than a pen gap. This is the reason I am considering covering the whole lot.

              The room is very big & sanded look I refer but what about having to push all that wire wool between the boards...
              .

              If the cracks in the floor boards are big enough for a mouse to get though then they really need taking up and re-laying so there are no big cracks! Apart from the mouse, draughts will get up through the gaps and send your energy bills sky-high. You may have to employ a joiner to do that, but it will give you a much better finish. The wire wood might work, but unless you can get it to blend in with the floorboards, it will look odd. And does it allow you to take up the floorboards afterwards?

              If there are gaps where the floorboards meet the skirting boards,these can be filled with various things or covered by quarter beading (ie beading which is 90 degrees in cross section).
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


                Thanks again Mind the Gap. Finding it hard to decide what to do. Builder is currently about to quote me on laminate and also sanded. Tenant has completely moved out this month but says I can start work on the room next week so it would be good to get it done and be able to rent it out with little rent lost with a vacant room

                I think I just need to see what the floor looks like then decide what floor covering to do. It the boards are close enough for most of it then sanded. If not then decide between Lino/Vinyl and laminate.

                I Have used Lino/Vinyl in smaller shower room & small kitchen and they look fine. I impress myself on how good they look. However I feel that for such a very large double room I think that the lino/vinyl will go bumpy, ride up and look cheaper over time.

                ...

                Comment


                  Originally posted by BusyLandlord View Post
                  Thanks again Mind the Gap. Finding it hard to decide what to do. Builder is currently about to quote me on laminate and also sanded. Tenant has completely moved out this month but says I can start work on the room next week so it would be good to get it done and be able to rent it out with little rent lost with a vacant room

                  I think I just need to see what the floor looks like then decide what floor covering to do. It the boards are close enough for most of it then sanded. If not then decide between Lino/Vinyl and laminate.

                  I Have used Lino/Vinyl in smaller shower room & small kitchen and they look fine. I impress myself on how good they look. However I feel that for such a very large double room I think that the lino/vinyl will go bumpy, ride up and look cheaper over time.

                  ...
                  I think so, too. And for the cost of laying the right subscreed/underfelt/ whatever plus the cost of the vinyl itself, you could get the whole floor sanded and varnished. It will last years and is easily beautified by a quick sand and re-varnish in a few years' time using a hand-held sander (you don't have to hire a big monster one again, like you do the first time). Odd scratches can be sanded out and re-varnished - and the whole thing will look a lot nicer for a lot longer.

                  Plus, it is more environmentally friendly... and you will be able to get at pipework, wiring, etc., if you need to, much more easily.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                  Comment


                    Well you have had opinions on the floor.

                    For what it's worth, I do use vinyl for small areas but it doesn't wear well at all. It does stain, if a tenant puts a box or plastic bag on a damp floor the dye comes out and will not come out, it's really easy to rip moving applicances in and out, high heels cause dents etc etc. It has its uses and is a cheap and cheerful solution but not a high spec, long term solution.

                    However, I really feel you should try and sort the mouse issue. I have dealt with, successfully I might add, some major mice infestations and some lesser ones. The properties with the mice are prone to them but the key is to block up ALL holes - inside and out.

                    I went round the outside perimeters of two large victorian houses converted into flats with a terrible mouse problem and had every single tiny hole filled. The same was carried out internally. Apparently, small holes are best stuffed with tin foil as mice can't chew that (never tried it myself, that was a recent discovery) but otherwise the holes were filled with caulk, filler, expandable foam, cement, mortar - whatever was suitable for the surface with the hole/gap! It was painstaking but it has worked.

                    Since then, the mouse problem has virtually disappeared. Out of 8 flats, all of whom had mice issues, I've had one tenant who heard a mouse but never saw it and then never heard it again, another who saw one and never saw it again and that's in over twelve months - these were attic flats so mice do run in the loft spaces so not much I can do there. A ground floor flat that was the most disgusting place you could ever wish to see and was teaming with the blighters literally having a party in there but the new tenant has never had one since and she's been in there for 12 months now. I know for a fact she hasn't as another tenant told her about the infestation problem and she was totally freaked out so she would definitely tell me if she's had one!

                    Don't be fooled into thinking they can't get under vinyl etc. Another flat, on lifting the carpet there was mouse poo everywhere underneath it and there were almost little tunnels under the carpet. Mice can shrink themselves to the size of a pen top.

                    Don't base your flooring decisions on mice, deal with the mouse issue.

                    Good luck and hope that helps over and above your flooring decision.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by bunny View Post
                      Well you have had opinions on the floor.

                      For what it's worth, I do use vinyl for small areas but it doesn't wear well at all. It does stain, if a tenant puts a box or plastic bag on a damp floor the dye comes out and will not come out, it's really easy to rip moving applicances in and out, high heels cause dents etc etc. It has its uses and is a cheap and cheerful solution but not a high spec, long term solution.

                      However, I really feel you should try and sort the mouse issue. I have dealt with, successfully I might add, some major mice infestations and some lesser ones. The properties with the mice are prone to them but the key is to block up ALL holes - inside and out.

                      I went round the outside perimeters of two large victorian houses converted into flats with a terrible mouse problem and had every single tiny hole filled. The same was carried out internally. Apparently, small holes are best stuffed with tin foil as mice can't chew that (never tried it myself, that was a recent discovery) but otherwise the holes were filled with caulk, filler, expandable foam, cement, mortar - whatever was suitable for the surface with the hole/gap! It was painstaking but it has worked.

                      Since then, the mouse problem has virtually disappeared. Out of 8 flats, all of whom had mice issues, I've had one tenant who heard a mouse but never saw it and then never heard it again, another who saw one and never saw it again and that's in over twelve months - these were attic flats so mice do run in the loft spaces so not much I can do there. A ground floor flat that was the most disgusting place you could ever wish to see and was teaming with the blighters literally having a party in there but the new tenant has never had one since and she's been in there for 12 months now. I know for a fact she hasn't as another tenant told her about the infestation problem and she was totally freaked out so she would definitely tell me if she's had one!

                      Don't be fooled into thinking they can't get under vinyl etc. Another flat, on lifting the carpet there was mouse poo everywhere underneath it and there were almost little tunnels under the carpet. Mice can shrink themselves to the size of a pen top.

                      Don't base your flooring decisions on mice, deal with the mouse issue.

                      Good luck and hope that helps over and above your flooring decision.

                      So from what you are saying even though I have laminate, vinyl or sanded wooded they can still come through so I would still be left with filling the gaps between the floorboards anyway. So I might as well go for sanded as this has a better quality look??? Did you say that the mouse would go through laminate flooring?

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by BusyLandlord View Post
                        So from what you are saying even though I have laminate, vinyl or sanded wooded they can still come through so I would still be left with filling the gaps between the floorboards anyway. So I might as well go for sanded as this has a better quality look??? Did you say that the mouse would go through laminate flooring?
                        In my opinion, whatever floor you have, if you don't eliminate how they are getting into the property then whatever flooring you have the problem will persist.

                        Mice come in from the outside. They don't have a long life span so if you eliminate their means of getting into the property then those already inside will eventually die or be trapped by you.

                        Of course, big gaps between floorboards will exaserbate a problem that already exists because there will be lots of easy routes for them to run in and out of whereas laminate or carpet restricts that, laminate moreso, but carpet, they can still make channels underneath because I've seen it.

                        If you laid carpet or laminate, mice in the property will find a way up anyway through gaps in skirting boards for example. Skirting board gaps can easily be filled. I caulked the gap from the bottom of the skirting boards to the floor in some flats. Every single gap and hole was filled. The flats do have floorboards with carpets but I believe I stopped them getting in. (I did not fill every floorboard underneath the carpet)

                        So, how are the mice getting into the property in the first place. I solved that and solved the problem bar the odd minor exception in the attics.

                        Treat the cause not the effect Hope that helps.

                        Comment


                          [QUOTE=mind the gap;129976]
                          1. A cat
                          [QUOTE]

                          Not that good. We have 2 of them, and yet seem to have a mouse at the moment. Said cats are in dog house and on a performance related feeding program!

                          To me sanding seems like the best option.

                          Comment


                            [QUOTE=davidjpowell;130018][QUOTE=mind the gap;129976]
                            1. A cat

                            Not that good. We have 2 of them, and yet seem to have a mouse at the moment. Said cats are in dog house and on a performance related feeding program!

                            To me sanding seems like the best option.
                            Ha! I love the 'performance related feeding programme'! (Thinks : wonder if it will work for teenagers?)

                            I must admit, the suggestion sprang more from optimism than personal experience, since the two cats we have at present are equally gormless when it comes to their half of the 'you want to live in this house?' bargain. They will scour the fields around us for wild mice, rabbits, slow birds - they even brought a dead rat in once (just showing off, I suspect - it had probably died of old age or something!)...but if a mouse rears its whiskers inside the house, they are interested, in a half-hearted sort of way, but not in the least savage and cleanly murderous, as you would want them to be.

                            Other people do tell me though, that their cats keep their houses rodent-free! Wonder if there is a test for this gene?
                            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                            Comment


                              We have all three solutions in different places. Certainly the wood effect lino in the bathroom looks great and is hygenic for the tenants and easy to keep clean. Lay plywood over the original wooden boards first.

                              Sanding boards are fantastic for lounge and reception. Strips of wood in the gaps, if large, helps. Mix the sawdust with wallpaper paste for the narrow gaps. However, it may only last a few years depending on the flexibility of the boards when walking on them.

                              Laminate flooring is ok in entrance hall, if you use a pattern as against just straight boards.
                              ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Paragon View Post
                                Mix the sawdust with wallpaper paste for the narrow gaps. However, it may only last a few years depending on the flexibility of the boards when walking on them.
                                No no no no! Mix sawdust with wood glue, then paste it in the gaps and smooth over with water before it sets. that will last a long time.
                                Or you could use a commercial plastic filler.
                                Mice love to eat wallpaper paste.
                                I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

                                Comment

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