Problems with rodent infestation: mouse/mice/rats/etc.

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    Rats.

    Dear All,

    moved into a new place recently, and have just discovered, much to my delight, that we have a rat problem.

    Our new Landlord appears to be taking a backseat - I just spoke to him and could not understand him (strong accent), but he didnt seem to like my idea of us getting rentokil in immediately to deal with the problem, and deducting it from our rent later.

    Does anyone know what the score is with doing this kind of thing - urgent matters such as rats i am not prepared to hang around for and would prefer to get rentokil in asap. is it legal / acceptable for me to get them in and deduct from rent?

    Im sure there are some proper channels I should be going down but if this chap is going to stall Ill have to take some more decisive action.

    Thanks

    Mike

    Comment


      It is probably the case that the tenancy agreement makes you responsible for dealing with vermin problems which arise during your tenancy (maybe this is what the LL is hoping to claim, if he does nothing for long enough). However it sounds to be a pre-exisiting problem and it is completely unacceptable for the LL not to act.

      If you are certain you have rats (are you? how?), call the environmental health dept. of your council and tell them. Tell LL you are doing that. Also tell him in writing that unless he arranges Rentokil or similar within 3 days you will do so yourself and withold rent.

      What a schmuck.

      Has this LL protected your tenancy deposit, by the way?
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

      Comment


        above threshold of 25K so "basic occupiers" applies again...

        this serves me right for not renting a smaller place with fewer people... but i will have to put it down to slow learning.

        Comment


          The point about vermin applies anyway.
          The only difference in your position is that Deposit Protection will not apply, as the letting is outside the 1988 Act.
          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

          Comment


            Here is the answer to your problem:
            http://shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_nkw=r..._from=R18&_ipg=

            Do not use poision the rats will make the most disgusting smell as they decay.
            A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
            W.Churchill

            Comment


              [QUOTE=mind the gap;154786]It is probably the case that the tenancy agreement makes you responsible for dealing with vermin problems which arise during your tenancy (maybe this is what the LL is hoping to claim, if he does nothing for long enough). However it sounds to be a pre-exisiting problem and it is completely unacceptable for the LL not to act. QUOTE]

              How can we prove the rats were there before we were? - we have written on a number of occasions to bemoan faulty wiring and a leaking dishwasher. it now appears these may be related to the rat problem - nothing has been done about them since we moved in (we still have the inventory because the agency failed to send it to us in the first two weeks, so we can still make amendments).

              Dont see why we should be responcible for paying for vermin problems when we have only lived here a month.

              PS> I know we have a rat. He just wandered along the kitchen sideboard. This is HIGHLY unpleasant.

              Comment


                Presumably you are talking about rats in the residence rather than rats in the garden. I think rats in the residential areas are totally unacceptable and I'd take immediate action including calling the Council pest control section.
                If the problem is rats in the garden, I'd look for the reason why they are there. Rats need cover eg a pile of rubbish or space under a shed PLUS a source of food and water. Remove these and the problem should disappear.
                Inside the building could be more difficult and you probably need professional advice/help. Fortunately rats, are easier to control than mice. Use of poison coupled with cutting off their access routes and sources of food and water, should get rid of them quickly - though even the short interval will be unpleasant/intolerable.

                Comment


                  Originally posted by tenantimafraid View Post

                  How can we prove the rats were there before we were? - we have written on a number of occasions to bemoan faulty wiring and a leaking dishwasher. it now appears these may be related to the rat problem - nothing has been done about them since we moved in (we still have the inventory because the agency failed to send it to us in the first two weeks, so we can still make amendments).

                  Dont see why we should be responcible for paying for vermin problems when we have only lived here a month.

                  PS> I know we have a rat. He just wandered along the kitchen sideboard. This is HIGHLY unpleasant.
                  The fact that you have only just moved in should be enough. You haven't had the time to attract rats yet! I agree totally that it is the LL's job to sort it. He is probably wishing he did not charge the previous tenants now, but that is his problem.

                  Good luck. Let us know what happens.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                  Comment


                    A cat is the best solution. Available for free from your local rescue centre, particularly at this time of year. They often have semi-feral cats that would make a good outdoor cat.

                    I've lived in London for 12 years, and have always had rats in the garden (inevitably the odd one enters the house occasionally)... until now... as two feral cats have taken up residence in the garden. The entire area is rat free, hurrah!

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by mind the gap
                      Good grief. Who on earth could face extracting the mangled corpse of the rat from one of those contraptions first thing in a morning? Mice in mouse-traps are bad enough - this would be gross.
                      Well you could use a humane trap and catch them alive, but then you need to buy a very nice air rifle to dispatch the captured vermin, then simply tip up the cage into a bin bag and deposit in bin, or send to your LL!

                      I have serious problems with squirrels ever year in my attic - vicious little blighters - I use the above to assist. But the most efficient are these little babies :

                      http://www.kania.net/
                      A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                      W.Churchill

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        The fact that you have only just moved in should be enough. You haven't had the time to attract rats yet! I agree totally that it is the LL's job to sort it. He is probably wishing he did not charge the previous tenants now, but that is his problem.

                        Good luck. Let us know what happens.
                        I don't think rats have much time comprehension - probably doesn't have much to do with you or the landlord. They just show up when and where they want. It doesn't take them long to sniff out one rubbish bag for example. Think you and the LL should get onto the council (about £60 last time I had them - but the guy didn't charge me in the end anyway - I guess that cup of tea and biscuits was key). A good idea would be to offer to split the cost.
                        ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

                        Comment


                          Shelter at...
                          http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_ad...IGN_NAME=print

                          suggests

                          Vermin - rats and mice
                          Rats cause damage and can spread disease. If they are in or near your home, you need to take steps against them. Mice are usually harmless outdoors, but in the home can cause damage and spread disease. Put food away in sealed containers or on high shelves. If the problem gets bad, take steps against them.

                          If you are the homeowner, you can use shop-bought traps or poison, or use a pest control company. If you rent your home, report the problem to the landlord, who should deal with it. If there are rats on neighbouring land, it is your neighbours' responsibility to deal with them. If your landlord or neighbour refuses to do anything, report the situation to the council's environmental health department.
                          (Pretty bleedin' obvious...)

                          But in your shoes I think I'd contact environmental health and the local council private renting dept (eg
                          http://www.slough.gov.uk/services/18542.aspx
                          &
                          http://www.oxford.gov.uk/housing/private-renting.cfm
                          )
                          and let them know about the problem: After advising the LL that that is what you are going to do, in writing, keeping a copy.

                          Sorry to hear of your experiences. I've had rats in houses I've rented out, but they only had 2 legs...

                          Hope it gets sorted...

                          Cheers!

                          Lodger
                          I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                          Comment


                            [QUOTE=westminster;152198]Trap bait - I've heard they like Nutella.
                            QUOTE]


                            Yes, we tried that and it worked. To solve the problem we will need to relay our kitchen floorboards behind our units!

                            Comment


                              Poison is the most effective as the mice will usually take it back to any nest and die their. As its a coagalent it dehydrates them (thickens their blood)and when they die there is hardly any moisture in their body . Because mice are very small they end up like a dried crisp and there is virtually nothing to smell.

                              A can of expanding foam is usefull for filling in any gaps in the fabric of the building although mice can access thru very tiny holes.

                              Comment


                                I agree with the poster above that poison is better than traps as traps will only kill some of the mice but poison can kill all of them. Sakarat is the poison we found very effective, you can buy it online.

                                Comment

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