I was a bad tenant...

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    I was a bad tenant...

    Hey there,

    So recently I moved out of a property at only 14 days notice and had only paid up until the day I left because of money and personal issues. Since then I have been able to pay the rest of the month, forfeited my deposit and I will pay the cleaners fee once it's complete.

    The contract was for 12 months and I have left after 6.

    Obviously the landlord isn't happy and threatening to have me bothered at work, trying to intimidate me saying he knows my boss and that I'm 'deluded' if I don't think this will affect my work.

    He had said previously 'pay the rest of the month and forfeit your deposit or I'll prosecute you' - Does this constitute a new written agreement?

    His emails get quite personal at times so I try to be as polite as possible.

    I realise I am in the wrong and I could have been prosecuted but now I've met his conditions, does that free me from the scary prospect of prosecution at all?

    #2
    This site is primarily for lettings in Great Britain.

    That said, I wouldn't worry too much about being prosecuted. If Irish judges are anything like English ones, you'll get away without paying anything.

    Your thread title made me laugh though.
    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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      #3
      It may indeed constitute an conditional acceptance of your surrender. Proving it may be another matter.

      Just noticed location - don't know Eire rules

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        #4
        I'm not really looking to get away without 'paying anything'. I would like an amicable end to the contract.

        The Landlord has now said 'pay what's due or i'll prosecute you' and I've paid exactly what he's requested. I just don't know where to go from here.

        The place is in perfect condition, I've let atleast £200 of items in there as ones in the apartment were broken when I arrived and I treated it well.

        I just went about leaving a completely wrong way.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by AnonIE View Post
          Hey there,

          So recently I moved out of a property at only 14 days notice and had only paid up until the day I left because of money and personal issues. Since then I have been able to pay the rest of the month, forfeited my deposit and I will pay the cleaners fee once it's complete.

          The contract was for 12 months and I have left after 6.

          Obviously the landlord isn't happy and threatening to have me bothered at work, trying to intimidate me saying he knows my boss and that I'm 'deluded' if I don't think this will affect my work.

          He had said previously 'pay the rest of the month and forfeit your deposit or I'll prosecute you' - Does this constitute a new written agreement?

          His emails get quite personal at times so I try to be as polite as possible.

          I realise I am in the wrong and I could have been prosecuted but now I've met his conditions, does that free me from the scary prospect of prosecution at all?
          Your ex-landlord can only sue you for money that was legally owing, and it sounds as if you've paid that. Well done.

          He could have held you to the full term of the contract but it sounds as if he has accepted your surrender of the tenancy. Don't worry too much, if you get any more threats then post them here and we'll help you with the best way forward.
          I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

          Comment


            #6
            Should clarify that I'm currently living in England.

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              #7
              Originally posted by AnonIE View Post
              I'm not really looking to get away without 'paying anything'. I would like an amicable end to the contract.
              I don't think you will get an amicable outcome with such a landlord. Has he got anyone else yet? General rule in England is that taking someone else means he can't continue to come after you for rent.
              To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jta View Post
                Your ex-landlord can only sue you for money that was legally owing, and it sounds as if you've paid that. Well done.

                He could have held you to the full term of the contract but it sounds as if he has accepted your surrender of the tenancy. Don't worry too much, if you get any more threats then post them here and we'll help you with the best way forward.
                See I'm not sure to understand it as an acceptance of surrender as except for the first email which stated:

                "What happens now is that you can either agree to pay April rent, and lose your deposit for breech of contract. Or I will take matters further, and prosecute you for breech of contract."

                We've argued since then as he's tried to threaten me with work related issues etc so I've tried to calm things down a bit. I've paid what he's asked but he hasn't said "Ok that's fine now" or anything.

                He's also insisting on an exit inventory even though an entry one was never completed! The LL didn't arrive for the multiple days we had planed this for.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I think that's clear - he gave you a choice, you accepted the first option.

                  Don't worry about the inventory, though having some photos of the place would be sensible.

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                    #10
                    He's being quite aggressive I'm just afraid he'll be like 'Thanks for the £, I'm prosecuting you anyway because the contract says so'.

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                      #11
                      No promises, but I see his offering the choice as a change to the contract. You complied. We can't promise you what he will do - but if you look at my recent posts you'll find I was in court recently as a LL and the judge was not willing to award anything against the tenant if there was even the slightest doubt.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thanks for the help

                        I originally saw it as a 'surrender' option but since the original email he has said 'I want you to pay for cleaners too' and I've agreed to that as it's fair enough.

                        I'm a push over and just don't know when the point where I say 'I've given you what you've asked. Are we done?' comes :/

                        I have a meeting with the CAB on Tuesday but he's threatened to come harass me at my place of work before then.

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                          #13
                          imho now is the time to say that.

                          harassment is an offence, so drop him an email or text (if you have a way to store texts) saying you have done what he asked and if he harasses you, you will report to the police.

                          Then, follow it up in writing, getting a free certificate of posting from a post office.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            So, until he clarifies that he can turn around and say 'Ok, I'm prosecuting you anyway'?

                            One of his conditions seems to be to meet in person which, given his conduct over email, I don't want to do even with a friend in a public place. I know at the end of the day this is my fault but...I just want to throw money at this problem to make it go away.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Have you asked him why he wants to meet in person? You could say you are very busy, don't have the time and would be happy to settle any matter over e-mail or if necessary by phone. If he realizes you do want to settle perhaps he won't insist on doing it a certain way (e.g. meeting or coming to your workplace)

                              Didn't you say the tenancy was in Ireland and you now live in England. If that's the case, how would you meet anyway?

                              Comment

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