Question RE condemned cooker

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    Question RE condemned cooker

    Hi All.
    We have been renting our property for 16 months now. The house came with a 100cm gas range cooker. Last year when the gas appliances were checked one of the ovens on tha ranged cooker was deemed unsafe to use. The estate agents sent someone to repair the cooker however it could not be repaired as it is no longer being manufactured and the part needed could not be sourced.
    The agents said that we could either continue to use the cooker as is (using the 2nd oven i the range cooker) or they could replace it with a small cooker. We decided that a small 60cm cooker would look stupid in the space as the kitchen was built to house a 100cm.
    Yesterday the gas check was conducted again and the cooker has been condemned and switched off. I was just wondering is the landlord liable to replace like for like? I am concerned as there will be a 50cm gap with exposed pipes if a small cooker is put in its place.

    Thanks in advance

    #2
    The same thing has happened to mine

    What does it say in your tenancy agreement? It could be that you are responsible for a replacement cooker at the end of the original cooker's life, or it might be up to the LL to replace it.

    Comment


      #3
      Do you actually need a 1 metre wide cooker? I replaced a 50cm cooker a few weeks ago that cost me about £260, the excess space can easily be filled by an extra unit giving more storage space.
      I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

      Comment


        #4
        As far as I know, the LL will probably need to replace, but is not bound to replace like for like.

        My landlord replaced an induction hob (glass and had a cracked sharp edge) with a cheap and nasty ceramic one. I was not happy, but I have to live with it.

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          #5
          Originally posted by curlysue View Post
          Yesterday the gas check was conducted again and the cooker has been condemned and switched off. I was just wondering is the landlord liable to replace like for like? I am concerned as there will be a 50cm gap with exposed pipes if a small cooker is put in its place.
          Yes, he should replace like for like.

          Comment


            #6
            What does your tenancy agreement state about the appliances/cooker.

            He has no statutory obligation to replace the cooker at all, never mind like-for-like.
            Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

            Comment


              #7
              Have had a look at the tenancy agreement and the only reference is

              "The landlord agrees to fulfil his repairing obligations contained within Section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985."

              Comment


                #8
                Sorry meant to say that there is no meantion of any of the appliances....we have a fridge freezer (integrated), dishwasher (integrated) and gas range cooker...

                In relation to the space that the 50cm gap that would leave....to build or provide a unit would cost just as much as replacing with a similar size (90cm or 100cm) gas range cooker.I have had a look and there are some ranging from £400 - £600. So not much more than the £260 mentioned by jta!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by curlysue View Post
                  Have had a look at the tenancy agreement and the only reference is

                  "The landlord agrees to fulfil his repairing obligations contained within Section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985."
                  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1985/70

                  Repairing obligations

                  11 Repairing obligations in short leases.
                  (1)In a lease to which this section applies (as to which, see sections 13 and 14) there is implied a covenant by the lessor—

                  (a)to keep in repair the structure and exterior of the dwelling-house (including drains, gutters and external pipes),

                  (b)to keep in repair and proper working order the installations in the dwelling-house for the supply of water, gas and electricity and for sanitation (including basins, sinks, baths and sanitary conveniences, but not other fixtures, fittings and appliances for making use of the supply of water, gas or electricity), and

                  (c)to keep in repair and proper working order the installations in the dwelling-house for space heating and heating water.
                  Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I would say that you have a right to a replacement with the same level of utility,

                    but that doesn't include the same level of prettiness

                    tim

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thank you for your responses. I don't really care what it looks like, I just don't want a big gap with exposed pipes and bit of raised florr!

                      Comment

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