Need help finding a firm with a legal aid franchise in housing work

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  • Need help finding a firm with a legal aid franchise in housing work

    Hello, as the title says, does anyone know of a Solicitor in London area who has a legal aid franchise in housing work?
    We need one to help us regarding disrepair issue's at our home.

  • #2
    Put "legal aid solicitors london housing" in google

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you checked you qualify for LSC work??

      see..
      http://eligibilitycalculator.justice.../questions.asp

      Ask CaB or Shelter if they local offices if they will take your case..

      Do you want compo or the problem fixed?? How long has it been going on & what is the problem (roughly..) ??

      Please note with Dave cuting back on legal aid budget there ain't that much £££ per case for any solicitor to spend that much time...

      Cheers!!
      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Lodger, the disrepair is serious,..... damp/mould in bedrooms, been told by EHO many years ago that the cavity in the walls needs to be foamed. Many windows unable to open due to faulty windows, asbestos boards around roof hatch crumbling away, and a few more bits.
        The LL has been made aware of all these disrepair issue's many times perviously over the last 4 yrs. We have just decided enough is enough and we want this LL to either carry out the disrepair's finally, or be made to stand up in court and answer to a Judge.

        Comment


        • #5
          Or you could leave.

          If it is that bad then Environmental Health should be dealing with taking the LL to task. I agree with artful - try Shelter and CAB.
          There is always scope for misinterpretation.

          If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

          Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

          Comment


          • #6
            why should we leave, its our home. We'll be contacting the EHO again and first word we will mention is *asbestos* hopefully this will get them to do something, but past experience with trying to get them to help us in the previously, we don't really have to much confidence in them. .
            Thanks for the tip to contact Shelter.
            Just letting you know. The LL has a very long history of always refusing to comply with tenancy laws in the past, almost o all occassion before at the very last minute before court action, finally carrying out the works. They have always behaved this way, and quite honestly we feel surely its about time they were held to boot for always causing stress and worry to us by acting this way. They clearly know they have leagl obligations to do the works, as has been proven many times in the past by them at the very last minute always caving in, and settling, or carrying out their duties.

            Comment


            • #7
              Whilst I am all for taking action against a dodgy landlord, remember that he can take action against you in return and issue you notice. You say you don't want to move, but you may have no choice if he evicts you in retaliation.

              I am not saying you have to live with his neglect, but just making you aware that these things don't always work in your favour!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks lesley, we are rent act tenants.

                Comment


                • #9
                  OK, so Rent Act: Rights & responsibilities as I'm sure you know very different: Many Solicitors & quite a few CaBs may not fully understand the differences so suggest be careful with who you go with..

                  You are probably aware of the following..

                  This... (click on link...)
                  http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_ad...ated_tenancies

                  -outlines some good background - in particular..
                  http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_ad...ed_tenancies#5
                  Getting repairs done

                  The law says your landlord has to keep the structure and exterior of the property in good repair. This includes:

                  the roof
                  guttering
                  walls (but this doesn't include internal decoration)
                  windows and doors.

                  Your landlord must also keep the equipment for the supply of gas, electricity, heating, water and sanitation in good repair. Your landlord may have extra responsibilities to repair depending on what your tenancy agreement says.

                  You are responsible for looking after the property. This might include unblocking a sink or changing a fuse when necessary. You may also have other responsibilities depending on what your tenancy agreement says.

                  Your landlord must have a valid gas safety certificate for any gas appliances in the property. Any furniture provided should be fire resistant.

                  If your accommodation needs repairs inform your landlord or agent. If the repairs are your landlord's responsibility and are not done there may be ways you can force your landlord to carry out the work.

                  Please see the section on repairs and bad conditions for more information about your rights.
                  ..

                  and this..
                  http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_ad...dvice_helpline
                  - is Shelter's helpline (**free**) which may be worth a call..
                  Shelter provides a free, national telephone advice line staffed by trained housing advisers. We have helped thousands of people, from finding them a place to sleep to suggesting how to handle mortgage arrears.
                  Ring 0808 800 4444

                  8am-8pm Monday-Friday
                  8am-5pm Saturday-Sunday

                  Calls are free from UK landlines and main
                  mobile networks (Virgin, Orange, 3, T-mobile, Vodafone and O2).

                  Typetalk calls to the helpline are welcome.*

                  We will answer your call as quickly as we can and treat it confidentially. The helpline gets very busy at times, but please keep trying. Calls are recorded for training purposes.

                  Our advisers can:

                  give you immediate, practical assistance
                  explain your rights
                  offer advice and guidance
                  suggest specialist or local support services to help you longer term.
                  - suggest you explain you are Rent Act tenants & then check whoever you speak to understands what that mean..

                  So what happened when (hopefully..) you wrote (yes WRITE!!! - keeping copies, copy EHO) to Landlord a calm letter outlining the issues, when you reported, what had or had not been done & requesting landlord's plan within, say, 7 working days??

                  Please keep posting for more info & more questions & welcome to LLZ!!

                  Best regards & Cheers!!

                  Artful
                  I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Do you know what type of asbestos it is around the loft hatch?

                    What is the cause of the damp? Structural failure? how is cavity injection likely to do anything other than make this worse?
                    [I]The opinions I give are simply my opinions and interpretations of what I have learnt, in numerous years as a property professional, I would not rely upon them without consulting with a paid advisor and providing them with all the relevant facts[I]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MrJohnnyB View Post

                      What is the cause of the damp? Structural failure? how is cavity injection likely to do anything other than make this worse?
                      Cavity insulation would help if the problem was condensation - though may not cure it

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        But if its penetrative damp it would make it significantly worse. Furthermore, filling the cavity with foam may have a detrimental impact and make penetrative damp appear if it wasn't there before. The purpose of a cavity is to allow water to run down the interior face of the external brickwork. If you fill it with foam this cannot happen. Both bricks and blocks are semi permeable.

                        When a house is built the only contact between the external wall leafs are wall ties. These are designed to prevent the connection of water between the external wall and the internal wall with bends to create drips which will then vent at the bottom of the cavity or at a cavity closer.
                        [I]The opinions I give are simply my opinions and interpretations of what I have learnt, in numerous years as a property professional, I would not rely upon them without consulting with a paid advisor and providing them with all the relevant facts[I]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree - but just pointing out it may not be structural, only condensation - I'm also aware that EHO should know that cavity fill may make structural defects worse - but may improve condensation - and they are the ones that have seen it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by palmer11 View Post
                            why should we leave,
                            I note your Rent Act tenants which changes things but.......

                            Ultimately, if you are that concerned about the dangerous state of the property and the LL refuses to act, then why stay in occupation? Stubborness? There are many, many more good landlords with good properties in the market than bad ones.

                            The regularity that a tenant posts on here about how terrible, dangerous horrible their rented property is and how it's making them ill or ruining their possessions and yet they flatly refuse to move.

                            One of the reasons why bad landlords get away with being bad landlords is that tenants stay in these poor properties thinking they can 'change the LLs ways'.

                            You state that the property has been the in disrepair for many years and yes, your LL should be fixing it but they aren't.

                            If your only option is to remain in the property (which I don't think is the case) then you have only a few limited options;
                            1. to be badgering EH continuously to act against the LL.
                            2. to carryout works yourself.
                            3. to accept it and live with it.

                            Asbestos is a nasty product but actually very easy and straight forward to deal with. Wear a dustmask and a paper all-in-one romper suit. Wetting the asbestos down and keeping it wet during removeal will stop it crumbling into dust (which is the danger bit). Double bag it (with the dust masks and romper suits) and clearly mark it asbestos and take it to your local tip. Your council will have a tip that will take domestic asbestos waste.

                            You could apply and get the cavities filled for £100 by your energy supplier. You may even get this waived if you're on benefits. You may have to be a bit economical with the truth regarding ownership but the whole reason for the subsidised scheme is to help people like you out so no harm no foul as far as I'm concerned.

                            I know that you shouldn't have to do these things but if you're determined to stay put and no one else is helping and if you can find them, maybe you can hire the, no wait I've gone off track there.

                            All I'm saying is that you should take a step back and look at things less personally. Is your idea of home really a damp, mouldy, asbestos ridden building?
                            There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                            If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                            Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There is a procedure, established by case law (Lee-Parker v- Izzet [1971] 1 WLR 1688) whereby a T may carry out repairs and deduct the cost from the rent.

                              The procedure must be strictly followed, and copies of all correspondence etc carefully kept, otherwise you may face eviction for unpaid rent.

                              You should also be 100% certain that the repairs are the LL's liability (I dimly recall a thread on here about a Rent Act T who initially had, I think, a longer lease, and it made him liable for repairs).

                              For further details of the procedure, see http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_ad..._doing_repairs

                              Comment

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