Tenant History Database

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  • Tenant History Database

    Evening guys,

    Just wondering if anyone is now using a tenant history database service such as what is being advertised in this months Landlord and BTL magazine?

    Seems like a good idea if everyone bothered to do it...

    Sorry if this has already been asked, did a quick search but didn't show any other recent threads.

    Thanks

  • #2
    This is a bit of a perennial one on many sites but I think it maybe against data protection and/or human rights laws to put a person's name on such a list.
    I am not aware that anyone has started one - have a go Dan.



    Freedom at the point of zero............

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Interlaken View Post
      I am not aware that anyone has started one
      Actually I've come across quite a few of these over the past few months; no idea whether anyone's using them or if they work. Presumably any effectiveness is greatly weakened if there are lots in circulation, as opposed to one 'central' one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, there is one called Landlord Referencing.co.uk which sends updated as soon as a new tenant is registered in your area.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kerbut View Post
          Yes, there is one called --- which sends updated as soon as a new tenant is registered in your area.
          I don't see the point at all apart from indeed bringing trouble onto themselves.

          Comment


          • #6
            Experian are integrating tenancy performance into their credit referencing system.

            see:

            http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2012...s-credit-files

            Just to be clear, I don't agree with databases such as Experian's that unilaterally share personal data and dish out extra judicial punishment.

            Surely they violate the human right to a fair trial (article 6) if your ability to access credit can be ruined by a credit referencing agency without any hearing in a recognised court?

            However, with so much stacked against landlords, and so little incentive for tenants to keep to their obligations, it would encourage some tenants to pay on time if their credit rating was at risk. The upside for the tenant is that they could grow a better credit score by being a good tenant.

            Whilst there are baddies out there, it is a testament to tenants that most do actually keep to their side of the bargain out of good will, even without much legal deterrent. Most are honest and that should be encouraged ethically.

            Comment


            • #7
              That only works of course for tenants who have rented previously. For most students and other first time renters, it's meaningless.

              Plus, I wouldn't trust the organisers of such databases to keep the info confidential or even accurate.
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bureaucrazy View Post
                Experian are integrating tenancy performance into their credit referencing system.
                see:
                http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2012...s-credit-files
                In principle I like the idea that I can report a non-paying tenant somewhere "official" and that I can benefit from this reciprocally. It does annoy me that a tenant debtor can run up serial debts on tenancies without affecting his credit record.

                However I'm not seeing how the system is going to function, especially with no central registration of tenancies/landlords etc? Do I, as a member of the public and landlord, contact Experian and just tell them that XYZ tenant has just absconded without paying the rent? (even if actually he hasn't, and I just bear a grudge?) "If there is a genuine dispute over a missed rent payment Experian said the information would not appear on a tenant's record until it was resolved." How does the tenant (who's vanished and is uncontactable anyway) get the right of reply before he gets the black mark on his record and finds himself being rejected for tenancies? To fulfil this properly, Experian would need to seek verification from every tenant on whom they receive a bad report, before they can add it to their records.

                "Experian will have its work cut out to access data on every tenant in the country because of the sheer number of lettings agencies and amateur landlords across the country. "It's going to keep us busy," an agency spokesman said" - well they said it... the amount of work this could generate (and should generate, if it's going to work) is absolutely massive, with all the millions of ongoing tenancies, of which apparently 10.7% are in arrears. Probably why, almost a year on from the above press release, we've yet to hear any more about this?

                Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                That only works of course for tenants who have rented previously. For most students and other first time renters, it's meaningless.
                But the purpose is evidently to flag up people who've defaulted on their rent, which as first-timers these people won't have had the opportunity to do.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                  It does annoy me that a tenant debtor can run up serial debts on tenancies without affecting his credit record.
                  CCJs do affect credit score.


                  Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                  Do I, as a member of the public and landlord, contact Experian and just tell them that XYZ tenant has just absconded without paying the rent? (even if actually he hasn't, and I just bear a grudge?)
                  This was discussed on MoneySavingExpert, including with an Experian representative: Letting agent and landlords who sign up will share the info with Experian.
                  Which raises so many red flags that as a tenant I would be extremely worried.

                  Now, Experian claims that credit score won't be directly affected as rent-related data will be kept separate.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hope the Experian one takes off the ground, but a year on, and there's not much sign of it happening anytime soon.


                    At present, only CCJ's show on a credit report for tenants debts. This is not the same as other debts which show as current/late etc.

                    http://www.experian.co.uk/rental-exchange/index.html
                    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Question is, if you did have a Tenant who you wished others to know more of, does your tenancy agreement with said tenant permit you to share such personal & private info regarding that esteemed & upstanding individual?? Suggest you check...

                      Clauses like, from a well respected national body...
                      23. DATA PROTECTION, CONFIDENTIALITY AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAUSES
                      23.1 landlord and letting agents may share details about the performance of obligations under this agreement by the landlord and tenant; past, present and future known addresses of the parties, with each other, with credit and reference providers for referencing purposes and rental decisions; with utility and water companies, local authority council tax and housing benefit departments, mortgage lenders, to help prevent dishonesty, for administrative and accounting purposes, or for occasional debt tracing and fraud prevention. Under the Data Protection Act 1998 you are entitled, on payment of a fee which will be no greater than that set by statute, to see a copy of personal information held about you and to have it amended if it is shown to be incorrect.
                      -NB The way I read that means Agent can share info regarding landlord (??!!)

                      Me, I'd not trust the mickey-mouse operations run by perhaps (perhaps not..) bitter & twisted persons with weird axes to grind, albeit Experian should be slightly better...

                      Cheers!
                      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
                        albeit Experian should be slightly better...
                        Of course they have a procedure to correct erroneous data, but I'm guessing it takes time and obviously has to be initiated by tenant once he finds out.

                        When does a tenant is likely to find out? When he fails a check after applying for a new tenancy or credit (depending on how data is shared). Ie. too late.

                        But of course Experian has the answer since for a fee tenants can check data as they can for their credit score, which is what they advise tenants to do.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jjlandlord View Post
                          When does a tenant is likely to find out? When he fails a check after applying for a new tenancy or credit (depending on how data is shared). Ie. too late.
                          So, the same as any other erroneus entry.
                          Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by thesaint View Post
                            So, the same as any other erroneus entry.
                            Yes, but for some reason on average I trust that my bank or utility company will make less of such 'mistakes' that a letting agent or landlord... I'm so cynical.

                            And this is even without taking into account common or legitimate rent payment issues that do not usually exist in relation to bank and utility debts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jjlandlord View Post
                              Yes, but for some reason on average I trust that my bank or utility company will make less of such 'mistakes' that a letting agent or landlord... I'm so cynical.

                              And this is even without taking into account common or legitimate rent payment issues that do not usually exist in relation to bank and utility debts.
                              Without seeing the systems and checks put in place, I would rather think optimistically about a much needed resource.
                              Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                              Comment

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