nasty , mean landlord

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  • nasty , mean landlord

    hi'a .. any help will be gratefully received ! cut a long story short...im from lpool and moved to another city for 18 months found out brother was abusing my parents , moved them to safe house and moved myself , partner and 10 yr old daughter back to look after parents..rented a house 2 mins from mum landlord verbally told us he may consider selling in 3-4yrs...i have spent thousands updating this house as landlord also said he would give me discount in 3-4yrs should i consider buying...which i had full intentions of doing ! my 12 month written shorthold assured agreement runs out 1st march and he has decided to sell this house to enable him to invest in a buisness venture in usa ....This is so unfair...anything i can do ?

  • #2
    help !!

    i know this is a site in favour of landlords but im hoping there are some decent people ,who are landlords ,who may feel i have been dealt with unfairly , who may offer me some advice to enable me to stay in the home my private landlord promised a bit longer..to be near my mum and dad

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    • #3
      Nothing you can do I'm afraid! He is perfectly entitled to do this, as far as I can see there is not a thing you can do.
      Any posts by myself are my opinion ONLY. They should never be taken as correct or factual without confirmation from a legal professional. All information is given without prejudice or liability.

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      • #4
        You have my sympathies - a sad story. However legally-speaking I'm afraid you need to look at the situation objectively; the family history and situation makes no difference.

        So the fact is that you've taken on a 12-month tenancy agreement, and the LL is exercising his right to regain possession after the end of it. He may have led you on, and with hindsight it perhaps wasn't wise of you to invest all that money in the place when you have no security of tenure. See what others here think; however I don't think you have a chance of any comeback here.

        If the LL is a reasonable person, and recognises that you've added value to the property and/or made it more sellable, maybe he'd be willing to pay you something towards what you've done to the place? But he would have no obligation to do so, therefore it would be in your interests to grit your teeth and stay in good terms with him.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
          If the LL is a reasonable person, and recognises that you've added value to the property and/or made it more sellable, maybe he'd be willing to pay you something towards what you've done to the place? But he would have no obligation to do so, therefore it would be in your interests to grit your teeth and stay in good terms with him.
          A nice thought, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
          Now signature free.

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          • #6
            LL sounds like a (*&^%$ , but remember he isn't likely to be selling just to take advantage of the improvements you made to the place. If that was the intention, he could easily remortgage to release some tax-free equity.

            I think he is taking advantage of a business opportunity, selling a profitable no-risk (OK, relatively no-risk) property and putting his promise to you lower down the list of priorities.

            I'd be upset on a personal level, but legally it doesn't look good.
            He would probably be willing to rent you another property, maybe with some concessions thrown in. He can't be too happy about breaking his promise to you.

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            • #7
              If what you say can be proved in some way, such as, spending money on the land with the landlords consent and or agreement express or implied. Then you might be able rise a defense in promissory estoppel The basic rule is as follows:

              The defendant has done or said something to induce an expectation
              The plaintiff relied (reasonably) on the expectation...
              ...and would suffer detriment if that expectation were false.

              Note, this a defense in the course of legal proceedings and can be complex to argue, so you will need to seek legal advice pronto!

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              • #8
                Very good Bill! Difficult, but not impossible. Might force a settlement. I like it.
                ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

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                • #9
                  Oh dear!

                  Originally posted by podster
                  landlord verbally told us he may consider selling in 3-4yrs...i have spent thousands updating this house as landlord also said he would give me discount in 3-4yrs should i consider buying
                  Sorry but there's a lesson learned. The landlord is neither mean nor nasty. You should be glad that the landlord hasn't asked you to reinstate his property as it was before you moved in or issued you with a bill for damage to his property.

                  ... Or is that the next thing you will have to face on 1 March? ...

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