No room to store ex-tenant's stuff!

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  • No room to store ex-tenant's stuff!

    The bailiffs are due to turn up to evict my tenant in a couple of weeks.

    What happens if the tenant does not turn up to the eviction?

    ..................................

    I found the answer in another post.

    The bailiffs will be there and you can change the locks even if the T isn't there.
    Last edited by Berlingogirl; 28-11-2012, 14:12 PM. Reason: After looking for an hour I've finally found the answer!

  • #2
    Make sure that you can gain entry to the property, as the bailiffs aren't going to wait around for you to do so.
    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

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    • #3
      In your shoes I'd turn up with a lock-smith & maybe witness. You will have to pay locksmith. Even if T returns keys, change ALL the locks...

      Hope it goes well...
      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

      Comment


      • #4
        The bailiff is there to grant you possession. The lack of tenant is a good thing. The bailiff will invite you to open the premises - he will check the property is vacant (of people) and then hand you possession - job done, tenancy (and tenancy rights) over. If there are goods in the property, he will still grant you possession, but the goods are not yours to do as you please with.

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        • #5
          There is nothing worse than a tenant being present at an eviction. It almost always ends up messy and emotional, and can be quite distressing for the landlord by presenting a moral dilemma due to the immediacy of events.
          If the tenant is gone, you know you’ve done you preparation and homework properly. The defaulting tenant will have ‘accepted defeat’ and found themselves alternative accommodation.
          If you don’t already have keys in your hand that you know work in the lock, book a joiner/locksmith. The bailiff will not, normally, force entry on your behalf although I do have one who is already bigger than most doorways and ‘helps’ some of the sturdier locks. Normally they are present as an observer and to ensure you regain vacant possession of the property.
          On the very rare occasion that a tenant is in the property and refuses to leave, you may be lumbered with a bailiff who won’t forcibly remove them (as they’re not allowed to use more than reasonable force) and you’ll need to call for police assistance. Usually the police would remove them on grounds of ‘disturbing the peace’ or some such misdemeanour, with the aim of getting them out the property for the bailiff to sign over possession.
          In my humble experience, nine out of ten evictees have left. The other ones had no idea it was coming as partners had ‘hidden’ the problem. Those ones are messy.
          I may be a housing professional but my views, thoughts, opinions, advice, criticisms or otherwise on this board are mine and are not representative of my company, colleagues, managers. I am here as an independent human being who simply wants to learn new stuff, share ideas and interact with like minded people.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Darth Wookie View Post
            On the very rare occasion that a tenant is in the property and refuses to leave, you may be lumbered with a bailiff who won’t forcibly remove them (as they’re not allowed to use more than reasonable force) and you’ll need to call for police assistance.
            Our experience on this is that the bailiff would return the following day with appropriate support - but if the bailiff is willing to wait, I can see no harm in following Darth's route.

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            • #7
              No room to store ex-tenant's stuff!

              My tenant is due to be removed by the bailiffs soon.

              He has a dirty old settee and a huge old tv in the property.

              If he doesn't take these with him I am left with them. But I have no room to store them.

              They're not worth anything.

              I could put them in the garden and cover them with a tarp.

              Any ideas?

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              • #8
                He'll likely sue you for his priceless antiques....

                Either find somewhere to put them.. (eg storage space you hire..
                e.g.
                http://www.bigyellow.co.uk/

                ) or be V V V V V careful to take loads of photos & get witnesses of what was left...

                Chances are you'll never here from him... but he may sue and also reference those £500 notes left in sofa.. See LLZ guidance on abandoned goods...
                http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/uncollected_goods.htm
                I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                • #9
                  Two related threads have been merged.
                  I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

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                  • #10
                    I would write to T now and say that before vacating the T, all required possessions should be removed by the T. Anything remaining in the property will be presumed unwanted by T and will be treated as refuse and disposed of forthwith. Any cost for disposal & cleaning will be applied to the T.
                    The leagle's may splutter but at least T was given a deadline.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you everyone.

                      And thank you Moderator for merging. It is the same tenant but I thought it was two separate problems.

                      I will write to the T today asking him to remove all possessions on or before the big day. It's not as if he's not had months to sort it all out!

                      I have keys to the property so getting in won't be a problem. It's a HMO so the front door won't be changed and I have weekly access to the rooms for cleaning so it's unlikely, but not impossible that the room lock has been changed.

                      I've been on youtube to find out how to change the frontdoor lock and I'll pop round later to measure the barrel.

                      Eviction day is the last day of evictions before the Xmas break so if the T kicks off I'll call the police and if that doesn't work I'll be ready to murder someone!

                      It's not a nice situation and I'll be glad when it's all over.

                      Thanks for your support and I'll let you know the outcome.

                      Comment

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