Wear-and-tear / safety glass door

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    Wear-and-tear / safety glass door

    Hi,

    I'm a tenant and have been living in my house for 4.5 years. It's rented direct from the landlord and we have a fairly decent relationship. Last night my son managed to fall through a glass interior door, we ended up at the hospital but its not serious just a little glue to a cut on his forehead. I think my house was built in the 70's and I'm sure this door will have been there from new (no-one would put a door like that in in more recent times. My question is, should it have been left there when rented out to me? and now that its completely smashed, it was definitely not safety glass, who's responsibility is it to replace it? I haven't told my landlord yet as he doesn't tend to answer his phone at weekends.

    I have another question about decoration but I'll post that separately.

    Thanks

    Saffron

    #2
    More advice needed.

    Hi,

    I'm a tenant who has lived in my house for 4.5 years, it's privately rented direct from my landlord. I have 4 kids and have had since we moved in. The walls are all cream and the carpets all beige. No decoration has been done by me and none has been done in that time by my landlord. Who's responsibility is it as the cream walls are now pretty grubby. It's general wear of 5 people living in a house for this length of time, no writing on the walls by the kids or anything, I can't afford to redecorate the house so what do I do?

    Thanks

    Saffron

    Comment


      #3
      Maybe the landlord can provide the paint and you do the painting?

      Comment


        #4
        Yes maybe, what I'm more after though is, is there a definitive 'who is responsible'? What do other landlords' agreements say regarding this?

        Comment


          #5
          The formal answer is that it is your landlord's responsibility but he has no obligation.

          So you can ask him to do it but he is perfectly entitled to say no.

          Assuming that you have an OK relationship with your LL the best route is to talk to him about it and reach an agreement. Any reasonable landlord would be open to a discussion about keeping the property in good condition.

          If he is reluctant ideas you could put forward include: doing some/all the work yourself to keep costs down, only having one or 2 rooms done, splitting the cost etc. etc.

          Comment


            #6
            Thank you, I'll get in touch with him.

            Comment


              #7
              Someone please help me??

              Comment


                #8
                you mean you broke something in the house and you are asking who is responsible to repair it?
                All views posted reflect my personal opinion only and do not constitute professional advice which I am not qualified or knowledgeable enough to provide.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by MSaxp View Post
                  you mean you broke something in the house and you are asking who is responsible to repair it?
                  Since the damage was the result of an accident, the question is not unreasonable. The damage should be covered by the landlord's insurance.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    In that sense, isnt all damage either accidental or malicious? Would the tenant be liable to pay the excess?
                    All views posted reflect my personal opinion only and do not constitute professional advice which I am not qualified or knowledgeable enough to provide.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Two related threads have been merged.
                      I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I've put safety film on glass doors where tenants have young children. I wouldn't for adults or older children. From a risk assessment point of view a control method could be supervision of children so I don't think the landlord can really be at fault. Get the pane replaced with safety glass. It'll probably be cheaper than any excess.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          It is unreasonable to expect parents to supervise a child in its own home 24 hours a day to make sure it doesn't fall through a low pane of glass which is not toughened.

                          Whatever the legal position, common sense says that the glass door should have had safety glass installed in it by the LL before he let the property to a family with children, or been replaced by a wooden door.

                          Now that the pane has been broken, it is the LL's legal responsibility to replace it with toughened/safety glass and not with ordinary glass. Whether or not he charges you for that repair will depend on how decent he is. If he has any sense, he won't.
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Decorating : if it hasn't been done for 4-5 years then it would be decent if the LL offered, especially if you have been good tenants and he wants to keep you. Even if he offered to carry out a rolling programme of two or three rooms each year, that would be something.

                            I would not advocate offering to do it yourself unless you are a good decorator - he might object to the standard of the work and charge you to have it remedied by a professional.

                            Grubby emulsioned walls can usually be cleaned up pretty effectively with warm water and a little sugar soap, if all else fails.
                            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                              It is unreasonable to expect parents to supervise a child in its own home 24 hours a day to make sure it doesn't fall through a low pane of glass which is not toughened
                              I'm not sure I agree with this. I was born in the 70's and there were glass doors everywhere but I never fell through any. Would you say you think it's fairly likely a child will fall through it of it's there? I'm not a dad yet so I bow to your experience on this one

                              Perhaps this is a real problem with risk assessments. I always carry out a risk assessment based of HHSRS's 29 hazards but you have to make a judgement on likelihood. If a landlord has shown this process they may discharge their liability but 2 landlords may have different outcomes.

                              There are plenty of hazards in any house but supervision of children will protect them from many of them. Stairs are a hazard that will be gated until the child is 3/4 but supervision after this age is the only real control method.

                              Of course a glass door is a hazard and i personally get nervous about them and put safety film in where children are involved but I think a landlord could argue that a child should be supervised as a control method.

                              I used to work with children and did plenty of risk assessment training with the local authority. Often there are so many hazards present that the only realistic control method available was supervision with the the limit budget available.

                              I know the glass could be changed, rcd's could be fitted, linked smoke alarms fitted etc. But that's in an ideal world where budget's don't come into it.

                              Comment

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