Key Line Notice?

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    Key Line Notice?

    Firstly thank you for all the advice so far, this is a great forum.

    We went to one of our properties today, after a year or so. (The tenant was very ill with cancer, so we decided to give them some space.)

    After several attempts to make contact, we went to the property with a notice to enter letter.

    We found a notice stuck to the door, which said the following:

    Important Warning Notice
    The locks have been changed and the existing keys will not fit, if you attempt to use the wrong keys you may cause damage to the lock.

    A letter has been posted through your letter box explaining the circumstances of the lock change.

    You will need to provide proof of occupancy/ownership of the property before keys may be handed over to you.

    In case of doubt the police may be required to attend.

    Please call Key Line on 07xxxxxxxxx to get information/obtain your keys.
    Any ideas?

    #2
    The only reference I can find to Key Line on the net is the builders merchants of same name.

    Why not call and find out? I bet it is a premium rate line.

    Sounds like the tenant is not in habitation - could they be in hospital or worse?



    Freedom at the point of zero............

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      #3
      Originally posted by Interlaken View Post
      The only reference I can find to Key Line on the net is the builders merchants of same name.

      Why not call and find out? I bet it is a premium rate line.

      Sounds like the tenant is not in habitation - could they be in hospital or worse?
      I just get a voice mail when I call that line, do these kind of people/notices have any kind of legal standing?

      or can i just go in?

      Comment


        #4
        I doubt if they have had any authority unless it was from the tenant.
        The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

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          #5
          Many on this site would tell you not to enter but I would test my key to see if it fitted........the rest is up to you.



          Freedom at the point of zero............

          Comment


            #6
            Keyline sound like Locksmiths to me. Is it possible the tenant was taken ill, and relatives got emergency locksmith out to gain access, then changed the lock to secure the property?

            Are you aware of tenant's current situation? Are they in residence or could they be in hospital or gone into care? Is rent still being paid etc?

            Comment


              #7
              I would call the police and see if there was an incident at the address.
              Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by LesleyAnne View Post
                Keyline sound like Locksmiths to me. Is it possible the tenant was taken ill, and relatives got emergency locksmith out to gain access, then changed the lock to secure the property?

                Are you aware of tenant's current situation? Are they in residence or could they be in hospital or gone into care? Is rent still being paid etc?
                Well we cant get hold of them,

                We received a council tax letter recently saying the property was empty - hence the investigation, however we rang the council (was a DSS tenant) and they just said they need our bank details to release all the back dated rent to us.

                If the locks where changed for security, why would the lock smith now be holding the house?

                Comment


                  #9
                  The locksmith is not "holding" the house. The notice advises you not to put your keys in the lock - could jam and not come out again, hence costing you another call out to put it right. The notice advises that the locks are changed and you need to ring someone to get the keys.

                  Sounds like something untoward has happened to the tenant - long term care or worse, the house has been secured and for whatever reason, they have been unable to contact you to pass on the keys. It is possible the emergency services were called to force entry, and took tenant away. The notice is equally relevant to the tenant, so if they have not returned, you are the first to see it.

                  Keep trying the number, or google Keyline to see if there are any other contacts available. You asked earlier if you can just go in - if you don't have current keys, how do you plan to do this?

                  Was there a date on the notice? Have you contacted the police on 101 to see if there were any incidents at the address - I believe the Ambulance service can ask police permission to break-in if concern for welfare of the occupant.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by LesleyAnne View Post
                    The locksmith is not "holding" the house. The notice advises you not to put your keys in the lock - could jam and not come out again, hence costing you another call out to put it right. The notice advises that the locks are changed and you need to ring someone to get the keys.

                    Sounds like something untoward has happened to the tenant - long term care or worse, the house has been secured and for whatever reason, they have been unable to contact you to pass on the keys. It is possible the emergency services were called to force entry, and took tenant away. The notice is equally relevant to the tenant, so if they have not returned, you are the first to see it.

                    Keep trying the number, or google Keyline to see if there are any other contacts available. You asked earlier if you can just go in - if you don't have current keys, how do you plan to do this?

                    Was there a date on the notice? Have you contacted the police on 101 to see if there were any incidents at the address - I believe the Ambulance service can ask police permission to break-in if concern for welfare of the occupant.
                    Contacted the local control room, no records of emergency access etc, the "KeyLine" number is not responding, have rang about 10 times today.

                    I am thinking Bailiffs may of forced entry for some reason, and then secured the premises after?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Have you left a message on the Keyline voicemail? It may not be a permanently manned number, and if you leave your contract details, they will check and ring back.

                      Are there any neighbours near the property who may have seen something going on?

                      Is there any sign of life in the property - furniture, possessions etc?

                      Did you have references for the tenant when they moved in who might be able to give you any info?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Is this perhaps some company's (eg locksmith...) "Key Line" number - is there perhaps some other name or address on the notice??

                        Do the neighbours know anything??
                        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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